Geography and Plays, by Gertrude Stein

Please Do Not Suffer
A Play

Genevieve, Mrs. Marchand and Count Daisy Wrangel.

(Mrs. Marchand.) Where was she born and with whom did she go to school. Did she know the Marquise of Bowers then or did she not. Did she come to know her in Italy. Did she learn English in Morocco. She has never been to England nor did she go to school in Florence. She lived in the house with the friends of the count Berny and as such she knew them and she knew him. She went to eat an Arab dinner.

How did she come to know the people she has known. I do not understand it.

With whom did she go to school. We are not sure. When did she first know about Morocco. Where did she hear English.

She heard English spoken to children.

(Count Daisy Wrangel.) He speaks English very well. He has an impediment in his speech. He likes cauliflower and green peas. He does not find an old woman satisfactory as a cook. He wishes for his Italian. It is too expensive to bring her down. He does like dogs. He once had eight. They were black poodles. They were living in a garden on a duchess' estate. He trained them to be very willing and he has pictures of them all. He has often written a book. He writes about art sometimes. He also paints a little. He has a friend who paints a picture every morning and paints a picture every afternoon. He is not disagreeable. He did not come with him. He asked to see the dog he thought he had grown.

(Genevieve.) She believes in Fraconville. What is a thunder storm. This is my history. I worked at a cafe in Rennes. Before that I was instructed by a woman who knew knitting and everything. My mother and father worked at gardening. I was ruined by a butcher. I am not particularly fond of children. My child is a girl and is still a little one. She is living in an invaded district but is now in Avignon. I had a coat made for her but it did not fit her very well and now I am sending the money so that it will be made at Verdun. I am not necessarily a very happy woman. Every one is willing. I like knitting and I like to buy provision. Yes I enjoy the capital. There is plenty of meat here. I do not care for the variety. I prefer veal to chicken. I prefer mutton. I understand that it is difficult to have anything.

(Mrs. Marchand.) I do not write often. I say I will mention it if a man pays attention to a woman and so I can and I can say that I have not written. I will do as I like. I find that my baby is very healthy. I hope he will not talk the language spoken here but I can not say this to him. He is too young. He is not walking. If the Dardenelles are not taken perhaps they will open. I hear myself speaking. I have an orange tree that is open. The sun comes in. For ten days during ten days it rains and then until December we will have good weather. There is no fire in the house. I do not like to look at that map. Will you excuse me while I give my baby his luncheon.

(Count Daisy Wrangel.) It is the same name as an island. We were from Courland and some are Russians and some are Prussians and some are Swedes. None are Lithuanians. Mr. Berenson is a Lithuanian. I have a Danish friend who has been married four times. His last wife is a singer. She is a married woman. His first wife has been married to four different men. She has been a good friend to each one of them. They do say this. I have no pleasure in my stay on the Island because I do not eat anything. I would like to have something.

(Genevieve.) The count was here. He wanted to see the dog and he said he would like to see him. He was not very well. He had been suffering. He did not say that his friend would come with him. He said he thought not. I am often told that the french are everything. I ask do you believe that the french are winning. I believe that the french are winning. Do you need butter for cooking.

(Mrs. Marchand.) Let me give you a peach that is softer. Do you like this one. We will come again for an evening. This is the shortest way. Yes I like walking. We say very little when we are worrying. Let us go away. We cannot because my husband cannot go away.

Nellie Mildred and Carrie.

(Nellie.) Handwriting is not curving. It is not a disappointment or a service it is frequently prepossessing.

(Mildred.) It is copied. Six handkerchiefs. Two of one kind four of another.

(Carrie.) She backhands that means she takes good care of herself.

(Mrs. Marchand.) She does not know any of them. She knows Mr. Rothschild.

(Genevieve.) What is the use of being tranquil when this house is built for the winter. The winter here is warm.

(Count Daisy Wrangel.) He will not stay longer than November.

William and Mary.

(William.) He is fond of reading and drinking. He drinks wine. He also drinks siphon. This is water with sterilised water in it. He drinks it with and also without lemon. He is very fond of walking. He does not prefer resting. He is a painter by profession.

(Mary.) Mary is winning. She has a brother who is fighting. He has made a ring for her. She has a mother and another brother. We were asked does she like swimming. She has not a knowledge of swimming.

(Mrs Marchand.) She is a large woman and rather walking. She walks along. We met her and Mr. Marchand who were walking. We said it was too cold for walking.

(The English consul.) All right. The dog is too closely muzzled. He can't breathe properly.

(Count Daisy Wrangel.) Why do you all speak to me. Let me tell about it. In coming into the first office I first saw one young lady. I told her she was looking very well. I then went out and came back and went up to the other lady. I said how do you do I was sorry not to see you the other day. You were out when I called. My friend is a bear. I thought he would have come with me to call. I will come soon again.

(Mrs. Marchand.) I don't know him very well that is to say my husband has pointed him out to me and I knew he was here. It will not be a disappointment to us.

(Genevieve.) I prefer a basket to a mesh. It is the one souvenir that I will have. I do not wish to say that I am not pleased. I do not like to spend 35 dollars over again all over again. It is exact enough.

(Count Daisy Wrangel.) There is a great deal to write in a newspaper.

(Michael.) Michael was the son of Daniel. He moved into a house. He had been living at a hotel a whole winter. He has steam heat and light. We have not seen photographs of the place.

(Jane.) I have five children the youngest is three years old. Many of them died.

(Felix.) What kind of wool do you prefer black or in color, heavy or thin and for what use do you desire it. Do you also wish knitting needles and what thickness.

(Alice.) What did we have to eat today. We had very young pork. It is very delicious. I have never eaten it better.

(Genevieve.) I like to choose my meat.

(Mrs. Marchand.) I understand everything better. I like to have to think and look at maps. I hate to see so much black. I do not mean by that that I am sullen. I am not that. I am delighted with surroundings.

(Genevieve.) I wish to spend a little money on some things. I am waiting for the boat. I have nothing to do except sleep. Really not.

(Mrs. Marchand.) I understand Spanish.

(Count Daisy Wrangel.) To please him and to please me I do not dine at home.

(Harry Francis.) It hangs out in the rain and it is not dry what shall I put on underneath.

Anything you like.

(Roger Henry.) Why do you prefer a picture of a boat.

Because it is useful.

(Mrs. Marchand.) I am so disappointed in the morning.

We are all of us disappointed.

(Mrs. Marchand.) I did not meet you to-day.

Yes you did.

Every man swallowing. What.

(Mrs. Marchand.) I told you that you had every reason to expect warm weather and now it's cold.

It won't be cold long I hope. These are equinoxial storms. They last from seven to ten days.

(The English Consul.) He has had some trying experiences but he has a pleasant home. He has a view of the sea and also of the woods. It is natural that he has chosen that house.

(Mrs. Marchand.) I have met her. She is very pleasant. I did not think she was his wife. I thought she was his daughter.

So did we all.

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Last updated Wednesday, March 5, 2014 at 22:30