A Modern Theory of Ethics, by Olaf Stapledon

Table of Contents

Preface

  1. The Need for Ethics
  2. Self-Fulfilment as the Ground of Ethics
    1. Pleasure and the Enduring Self
    2. The Social Self
    3. The Actual Will and the Real Will
    4. My Station and its Duties
    5. Summary
  3. Criticism of the Self-Fulfilment Theory
    1. Emotive Aspects of the Theory
    2. The Individual and Society
    3. The Ambiguity of ‘Self’
    4. Implicates of the Actual Will
    5. Implicates of the Nature of Selfhood
    6. Summary
  4. Pleasure as Constitutive of Good
    1. Feeling Reinstated in Ethics
    2. Rationality of the Ideal
    3. Moral Obligation
    4. Illustrations
  5. Good as an Unique Quality
    1. Ethical Differences of Professor Moore and Professor Field
    2. Essentials of Professor Moore’s Theory
    3. Essentials of Professor Field’s Theory
    4. Ethical Compromise Between Moore and Field
  6. Teleology in Ethics
    1. Two Theories Contrasted
    2. Teleological Activity
    3. Teleology and Conation
    4. Ethical Implications of Teleology
    5. Summary
  7. Tendency in Physics and Biology
    1. The Meaning of Tendency
    2. Biological Tendencies
    3. Reducible and Emergent Tendencies
    4. Organisms and Societies
  8. Tendency in Psychology
    1. Bodily and Personal Needs
    2. Conation of Psychical Activities
    3. Inter-Relation of Organisms
    4. Objections to Instinct Psychology
  9. Psychical Conflict
    1. The Objective Sources of Conation
    2. The Problem of Irrational Choice
    3. Automatism and Free Choice
    4. Repression
    5. Summary of Discussion of Tendency in Psychology
  10. Objective Activity as the Ground of Ethics
    1. The Meaning of Good
    2. The Meaning of Better and Best
    3. The Meaning of Ought
    4. Logical Basis of Obligation
    5. Epistemological Considerations
    6. Summary
  11. Determinism and Free Will
    1. The Relation of Freedom to Ethics
    2. Introspection of Volition
    3. The Determinants of Free Will
    4. Responsibility
  12. Essentials of the Concrete Ideal
    1. Ideals and the Ideal
    2. The Abstract Form of the Ideal
    3. Comparative Evaluation
    4. The Social Aspect of the Ideal
    5. The Cosmical Ideal
  13. Reality and Admiration
    1. Activity and Reality
    2. Implications of Being Admired
    3. Organisms, Nature, and Aesthetic Objects
    4. Summary
  14. Moral Zeal, Disillusion, and Ecstasy
    1. Moral Zeal and Disillusion
    2. The Rise to Ecstasy
    3. Emancipation From Teleology
    4. Summary
  15. Ecstasy and Ethical Theory
    1. Destructive Arguments
    2. Hypothesis of Hyper-Biological Perfection
    3. Theoretical Difficulties
    4. Conclusions as to Ecstasy and the Ideal

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Last updated Wednesday, March 5, 2014 at 22:30