The Complete Poetical Works, by Percy Bysshe Shelley

Translations.

[Of the Translations that follow a few were published by Shelley himself, others by Mrs. Shelley in the “Posthumous Poems”, 1824, or the “Poetical Works”, 1839, and the remainder by Medwin (1834, 1847), Garnett (1862), Rossetti (1870), Forman (1876) and Locock (1903) from the manuscript originals. Shelley’s “Translations” fall between the years 1818 and 1822.]

Table of Contents

  1. Hymn to Mercury.
  2. Translated From the Greek of Homer.
  3. Homer’s Hymn to Castor and Pollux.
  4. Homer’s Hymn to the Moon.
  5. Homer’s Hymn to the Sun.
  6. Homer’s Hymn to the Earth: Mother of All.
  7. Homer’s Hymn to Minerva.
  8. Homer’s Hymn to Venus.
  9. The Cyclops.
  10. A Satyric Drama Translated From the Greek of Euripides.
  11. Epigrams.
  12. Fragment of the Elegy on the Death of Adonis.
  13. Fragment of the Elegy on the Death of Bion.
  14. From the Greek of Moschus.
  15. Pan, Echo, and the Satyr.
  16. From Vergil’s Tenth Eclogue.
  17. The Same.
  18. From Vergil’s Fourth Georgic.
  19. Sonnet. From the Italian of Dante.
  20. The First Canzone of the Convito. From the Italian of Dante.
  21. Matilda Gathering Flowers. From the Purgatorio of Dante, Canto 28, Lines 1-51.
  22. Fragment. Adapted From the Vita Nuova of Dante.
  23. Ugolino. Inferno 33, 22-75.
  24. Sonnet. From the Italian of Cavalcanti.
  25. Scenes From the Magico Prodigioso. From the Spanish of Calderon.
  26. Stanzas From Calderon’s Cisma De Inglaterra.
  27. Scenes From the Faust of Goethe.

Hymn to Mercury.

Translated From the Greek of Homer.

1.

Sing, Muse, the son of Maia and of Jove,

The Herald-child, king of Arcadia

And all its pastoral hills, whom in sweet love

Having been interwoven, modest May

5

Bore Heaven’s dread Supreme. An antique grove

Shadowed the cavern where the lovers lay

In the deep night, unseen by Gods or Men,

And white-armed Juno slumbered sweetly then.

2.

Now, when the joy of Jove had its fulfilling,

10

And Heaven’s tenth moon chronicled her relief,

She gave to light a babe all babes excelling,

A schemer subtle beyond all belief;

A shepherd of thin dreams, a cow-stealing,

A night-watching, and door-waylaying thief,

15

Who ‘mongst the Gods was soon about to thieve,

And other glorious actions to achieve.

3.

The babe was born at the first peep of day;

He began playing on the lyre at noon,

And the same evening did he steal away

20

Apollo’s herds; — the fourth day of the moon

On which him bore the venerable May,

From her immortal limbs he leaped full soon,

Nor long could in the sacred cradle keep,

But out to seek Apollo’s herds would creep.

4.
25

Out of the lofty cavern wandering

He found a tortoise, and cried out —‘A treasure!’

(For Mercury first made the tortoise sing)

The beast before the portal at his leisure

The flowery herbage was depasturing,

30

Moving his feet in a deliberate measure

Over the turf. Jove’s profitable son

Eying him laughed, and laughing thus begun:—

5.

‘A useful godsend are you to me now,

King of the dance, companion of the feast,

35

Lovely in all your nature! Welcome, you

Excellent plaything! Where, sweet mountain-beast,

Got you that speckled shell? Thus much I know,

You must come home with me and be my guest;

You will give joy to me, and I will do

40

All that is in my power to honour you.

6.

‘Better to be at home than out of door,

So come with me; and though it has been said

That you alive defend from magic power,

I know you will sing sweetly when you’re dead.’

45

Thus having spoken, the quaint infant bore,

Lifting it from the grass on which it fed

And grasping it in his delighted hold,

His treasured prize into the cavern old.

7.

Then scooping with a chisel of gray steel,

50

He bored the life and soul out of the beast. —

Not swifter a swift thought of woe or weal

Darts through the tumult of a human breast

Which thronging cares annoy — not swifter wheel

The flashes of its torture and unrest

55

Out of the dizzy eyes — than Maia’s son

All that he did devise hath featly done.

8.

. . .

And through the tortoise’s hard stony skin

At proper distances small holes he made,

And fastened the cut stems of reeds within,

60

And with a piece of leather overlaid

The open space and fixed the cubits in,

Fitting the bridge to both, and stretched o’er all

Symphonious cords of sheep-gut rhythmical.

9.

When he had wrought the lovely instrument,

65

He tried the chords, and made division meet,

Preluding with the plectrum, and there went

Up from beneath his hand a tumult sweet

Of mighty sounds, and from his lips he sent

A strain of unpremeditated wit

70

Joyous and wild and wanton — such you may

Hear among revellers on a holiday.

10.

He sung how Jove and May of the bright sandal

Dallied in love not quite legitimate;

And his own birth, still scoffing at the scandal,

75

And naming his own name, did celebrate;

His mother’s cave and servant maids he planned all

In plastic verse, her household stuff and state,

Perennial pot, trippet, and brazen pan —

But singing, he conceived another plan.

11.

. . .

80

Seized with a sudden fancy for fresh meat,

He in his sacred crib deposited

The hollow lyre, and from the cavern sweet

Rushed with great leaps up to the mountain’s head,

Revolving in his mind some subtle feat

85

Of thievish craft, such as a swindler might

Devise in the lone season of dun night.

12.

Lo! the great Sun under the ocean’s bed has

Driven steeds and chariot — the child meanwhile strode

O’er the Pierian mountains clothed in shadows,

90

Where the immortal oxen of the God

Are pastured in the flowering unmown meadows,

And safely stalled in a remote abode. —

The archer Argicide, elate and proud,

Drove fifty from the herd, lowing aloud.

13.
95

He drove them wandering o’er the sandy way,

But, being ever mindful of his craft,

Backward and forward drove he them astray,

So that the tracks which seemed before, were aft;

His sandals then he threw to the ocean spray,

100

And for each foot he wrought a kind of raft

Of tamarisk, and tamarisk-like sprigs,

And bound them in a lump with withy twigs.

14.

And on his feet he tied these sandals light,

The trail of whose wide leaves might not betray

105

His track; and then, a self-sufficing wight,

Like a man hastening on some distant way,

He from Pieria’s mountain bent his flight;

But an old man perceived the infant pass

Down green Onchestus heaped like beds with grass.

15.
110

The old man stood dressing his sunny vine:

‘Halloo! old fellow with the crooked shoulder!

You grub those stumps? before they will bear wine

Methinks even you must grow a little older:

Attend, I pray, to this advice of mine,

115

As you would ‘scape what might appal a bolder —

Seeing, see not — and hearing, hear not — and —

If you have understanding — understand.’

16.

So saying, Hermes roused the oxen vast;

O’er shadowy mountain and resounding dell,

120

And flower-paven plains, great Hermes passed;

Till the black night divine, which favouring fell

Around his steps, grew gray, and morning fast

Wakened the world to work, and from her cell

Sea-strewn, the Pallantean Moon sublime

125

Into her watch-tower just began to climb.

17.

Now to Alpheus he had driven all

The broad-foreheaded oxen of the Sun;

They came unwearied to the lofty stall

And to the water-troughs which ever run

130

Through the fresh fields — and when with rushgrass tall,

Lotus and all sweet herbage, every one

Had pastured been, the great God made them move

Towards the stall in a collected drove.

18.

A mighty pile of wood the God then heaped,

135

And having soon conceived the mystery

Of fire, from two smooth laurel branches stripped

The bark, and rubbed them in his palms; — on high

Suddenly forth the burning vapour leaped

And the divine child saw delightedly. —

140

Mercury first found out for human weal

Tinder-box, matches, fire-irons, flint and steel.

19.

And fine dry logs and roots innumerous

He gathered in a delve upon the ground —

And kindled them — and instantaneous

145

The strength of the fierce flame was breathed around:

And whilst the might of glorious Vulcan thus

Wrapped the great pile with glare and roaring sound,

Hermes dragged forth two heifers, lowing loud,

Close to the fire — such might was in the God.

20.
150

And on the earth upon their backs he threw

The panting beasts, and rolled them o’er and o’er,

And bored their lives out. Without more ado

He cut up fat and flesh, and down before

The fire, on spits of wood he placed the two,

155

Toasting their flesh and ribs, and all the gore

Pursed in the bowels; and while this was done

He stretched their hides over a craggy stone.

21.

We mortals let an ox grow old, and then

Cut it up after long consideration —

160

But joyous-minded Hermes from the glen

Drew the fat spoils to the more open station

Of a flat smooth space, and portioned them; and when

He had by lot assigned to each a ration

Of the twelve Gods, his mind became aware

165

Of all the joys which in religion are.

22.

For the sweet savour of the roasted meat

Tempted him though immortal. Natheless

He checked his haughty will and did not eat,

Though what it cost him words can scarce express,

170

And every wish to put such morsels sweet

Down his most sacred throat, he did repress;

But soon within the lofty portalled stall

He placed the fat and flesh and bones and all.

23.

And every trace of the fresh butchery

175

And cooking, the God soon made disappear,

As if it all had vanished through the sky;

He burned the hoofs and horns and head and hair —

The insatiate fire devoured them hungrily; —

And when he saw that everything was clear,

180

He quenched the coal, and trampled the black dust,

And in the stream his bloody sandals tossed.

24.

All night he worked in the serene moonshine —

But when the light of day was spread abroad

He sought his natal mountain-peaks divine.

185

On his long wandering, neither Man nor God

Had met him, since he killed Apollo’s kine,

Nor house-dog had barked at him on his road;

Now he obliquely through the keyhole passed,

Like a thin mist, or an autumnal blast.

25.
190

Right through the temple of the spacious cave

He went with soft light feet — as if his tread

Fell not on earth; no sound their falling gave;

Then to his cradle he crept quick, and spread

The swaddling-clothes about him; and the knave

195

Lay playing with the covering of the bed

With his left hand about his knees — the right

Held his beloved tortoise-lyre tight.

26.

There he lay innocent as a new-born child,

As gossips say; but though he was a God,

200

The Goddess, his fair mother, unbeguiled,

Knew all that he had done being abroad:

‘Whence come you, and from what adventure wild,

You cunning rogue, and where have you abode

All the long night, clothed in your impudence?

205

What have you done since you departed hence?

27.

‘Apollo soon will pass within this gate

And bind your tender body in a chain

Inextricably tight, and fast as fate,

Unless you can delude the God again,

210

Even when within his arms — ah, runagate!

A pretty torment both for Gods and Men

Your father made when he made you!’—‘Dear mother,’

Replied sly Hermes, ‘wherefore scold and bother?

28.

‘As if I were like other babes as old,

215

And understood nothing of what is what;

And cared at all to hear my mother scold.

I in my subtle brain a scheme have got,

Which whilst the sacred stars round Heaven are rolled

Will profit you and me — nor shall our lot

220

Be as you counsel, without gifts or food,

To spend our lives in this obscure abode.

29.

‘But we will leave this shadow-peopled cave

And live among the Gods, and pass each day

In high communion, sharing what they have

225

Of profuse wealth and unexhausted prey;

And from the portion which my father gave

To Phoebus, I will snatch my share away,

Which if my father will not — natheless I,

Who am the king of robbers, can but try.

30.
230

‘And, if Latona’s son should find me out,

I’ll countermine him by a deeper plan;

I’ll pierce the Pythian temple-walls, though stout,

And sack the fane of everything I can —

Caldrons and tripods of great worth no doubt,

235

Each golden cup and polished brazen pan,

All the wrought tapestries and garments gay.’—

So they together talked; — meanwhile the Day

31.

Aethereal born arose out of the flood

Of flowing Ocean, bearing light to men.

240

Apollo passed toward the sacred wood,

Which from the inmost depths of its green glen

Echoes the voice of Neptune — and there stood

On the same spot in green Onchestus then

That same old animal, the vine-dresser,

245

Who was employed hedging his vineyard there.

32.

Latona’s glorious Son began:—‘I pray

Tell, ancient hedger of Onchestus green,

Whether a drove of kine has passed this way,

All heifers with crooked horns? for they have been

250

Stolen from the herd in high Pieria,

Where a black bull was fed apart, between

Two woody mountains in a neighbouring glen,

And four fierce dogs watched there, unanimous as men.

33.

‘And what is strange, the author of this theft

255

Has stolen the fatted heifers every one,

But the four dogs and the black bull are left:—

Stolen they were last night at set of sun,

Of their soft beds and their sweet food bereft. —

Now tell me, man born ere the world begun,

260

Have you seen any one pass with the cows?’—

To whom the man of overhanging brows:

34.

‘My friend, it would require no common skill

Justly to speak of everything I see:

On various purposes of good or ill

265

Many pass by my vineyard — and to me

’Tis difficult to know the invisible

Thoughts, which in all those many minds may be:—

Thus much alone I certainly can say,

I tilled these vines till the decline of day,

35.
270

‘And then I thought I saw, but dare not speak

With certainty of such a wondrous thing,

A child, who could not have been born a week,

Those fair-horned cattle closely following,

And in his hand he held a polished stick:

275

And, as on purpose, he walked wavering

From one side to the other of the road,

And with his face opposed the steps he trod.’

36.

Apollo hearing this, passed quickly on —

No winged omen could have shown more clear

280

That the deceiver was his father’s son.

So the God wraps a purple atmosphere

Around his shoulders, and like fire is gone

To famous Pylos, seeking his kine there,

And found their track and his, yet hardly cold,

285

And cried —‘What wonder do mine eyes behold!

37.

‘Here are the footsteps of the horned herd

Turned back towards their fields of asphodel; —

But THESE are not the tracks of beast or bird,

Gray wolf, or bear, or lion of the dell,

290

Or maned Centaur — sand was never stirred

By man or woman thus! Inexplicable!

Who with unwearied feet could e’er impress

The sand with such enormous vestiges?

38.

‘That was most strange — but this is stranger still!’

295

Thus having said, Phoebus impetuously

Sought high Cyllene’s forest-cinctured hill,

And the deep cavern where dark shadows lie,

And where the ambrosial nymph with happy will

Bore the Saturnian’s love-child, Mercury —

300

And a delightful odour from the dew

Of the hill pastures, at his coming, flew.

39.

And Phoebus stooped under the craggy roof

Arched over the dark cavern:— Maia’s child

Perceived that he came angry, far aloof,

305

About the cows of which he had been beguiled;

And over him the fine and fragrant woof

Of his ambrosial swaddling-clothes he piled —

As among fire-brands lies a burning spark

Covered, beneath the ashes cold and dark.

40.
310

There, like an infant who had sucked his fill

And now was newly washed and put to bed,

Awake, but courting sleep with weary will,

And gathered in a lump, hands, feet, and head,

He lay, and his beloved tortoise still

315

He grasped and held under his shoulder-blade.

Phoebus the lovely mountain-goddess knew,

Not less her subtle, swindling baby, who

41.

Lay swathed in his sly wiles. Round every crook

Of the ample cavern, for his kine, Apollo

320

Looked sharp; and when he saw them not, he took

The glittering key, and opened three great hollow

Recesses in the rock — where many a nook

Was filled with the sweet food immortals swallow,

And mighty heaps of silver and of gold

325

Were piled within — a wonder to behold!

42.

And white and silver robes, all overwrought

With cunning workmanship of tracery sweet —

Except among the Gods there can be nought

In the wide world to be compared with it.

330

Latona’s offspring, after having sought

His herds in every corner, thus did greet

Great Hermes:—‘Little cradled rogue, declare

Of my illustrious heifers, where they are!

43.

‘Speak quickly! or a quarrel between us

335

Must rise, and the event will be, that I

Shall hurl you into dismal Tartarus,

In fiery gloom to dwell eternally;

Nor shall your father nor your mother loose

The bars of that black dungeon — utterly

340

You shall be cast out from the light of day,

To rule the ghosts of men, unblessed as they.

44.

To whom thus Hermes slily answered:—‘Son

Of great Latona, what a speech is this!

Why come you here to ask me what is done

345

With the wild oxen which it seems you miss?

I have not seen them, nor from any one

Have heard a word of the whole business;

If you should promise an immense reward,

I could not tell more than you now have heard.

45.
350

‘An ox-stealer should be both tall and strong,

And I am but a little new-born thing,

Who, yet at least, can think of nothing wrong:—

My business is to suck, and sleep, and fling

The cradle-clothes about me all day long —

355

Or half asleep, hear my sweet mother sing,

And to be washed in water clean and warm,

And hushed and kissed and kept secure from harm.

46.

‘O, let not e’er this quarrel be averred!

The astounded Gods would laugh at you, if e’er

360

You should allege a story so absurd

As that a new-born infant forth could fare

Out of his home after a savage herd.

I was born yesterday — my small feet are

Too tender for the roads so hard and rough:—

365

And if you think that this is not enough,

47.

I swear a great oath, by my father’s head,

That I stole not your cows, and that I know

Of no one else, who might, or could, or did. —

Whatever things cows are, I do not know,

370

For I have only heard the name.’— This said

He winked as fast as could be, and his brow

Was wrinkled, and a whistle loud gave he,

Like one who hears some strange absurdity.

48.

Apollo gently smiled and said:—‘Ay, ay —

375

You cunning little rascal, you will bore

Many a rich man’s house, and your array

Of thieves will lay their siege before his door,

Silent as night, in night; and many a day

In the wild glens rough shepherds will deplore

380

That you or yours, having an appetite,

Met with their cattle, comrade of the night!

49.

‘And this among the Gods shall be your gift,

To be considered as the lord of those

Who swindle, house-break, sheep-steal, and shop-lift; —

385

But now if you would not your last sleep doze;

Crawl out!’— Thus saying, Phoebus did uplift

The subtle infant in his swaddling clothes,

And in his arms, according to his wont,

A scheme devised the illustrious Argiphont.

50.

. . .

. . .

390

And sneezed and shuddered — Phoebus on the grass

Him threw, and whilst all that he had designed

He did perform — eager although to pass,

Apollo darted from his mighty mind

Towards the subtle babe the following scoff:—

395

‘Do not imagine this will get you off,

51.

‘You little swaddled child of Jove and May!

And seized him:—‘By this omen I shall trace

My noble herds, and you shall lead the way.’—

Cyllenian Hermes from the grassy place,

400

Like one in earnest haste to get away,

Rose, and with hands lifted towards his face

Round both his ears up from his shoulders drew

His swaddling clothes, and —‘What mean you to do

52.

‘With me, you unkind God?’— said Mercury:

405

‘Is it about these cows you tease me so?

I wish the race of cows were perished! — I

Stole not your cows — I do not even know

What things cows are. Alas! I well may sigh

That since I came into this world of woe,

410

I should have ever heard the name of one —

But I appeal to the Saturnian’s throne.’

53.

Thus Phoebus and the vagrant Mercury

Talked without coming to an explanation,

With adverse purpose. As for Phoebus, he

415

Sought not revenge, but only information,

And Hermes tried with lies and roguery

To cheat Apollo. — But when no evasion

Served — for the cunning one his match had found —

He paced on first over the sandy ground.

54.

. . .

420

He of the Silver Bow the child of Jove

Followed behind, till to their heavenly Sire

Came both his children, beautiful as Love,

And from his equal balance did require

A judgement in the cause wherein they strove.

425

O’er odorous Olympus and its snows

A murmuring tumult as they came arose —

55.

And from the folded depths of the great Hill,

While Hermes and Apollo reverent stood

Before Jove’s throne, the indestructible

430

Immortals rushed in mighty multitude;

And whilst their seats in order due they fill,

The lofty Thunderer in a careless mood

To Phoebus said:—‘Whence drive you this sweet prey,

This herald-baby, born but yesterday? —

56.
435

‘A most important subject, trifler, this

To lay before the Gods!’—‘Nay, Father, nay,

When you have understood the business,

Say not that I alone am fond of prey.

I found this little boy in a recess

440

Under Cyllene’s mountains far away —

A manifest and most apparent thief,

A scandalmonger beyond all belief.

57.

‘I never saw his like either in Heaven

Or upon earth for knavery or craft:—

445

Out of the field my cattle yester-even,

By the low shore on which the loud sea laughed,

He right down to the river-ford had driven;

And mere astonishment would make you daft

To see the double kind of footsteps strange

450

He has impressed wherever he did range.

58.

‘The cattle’s track on the black dust, full well

Is evident, as if they went towards

The place from which they came — that asphodel

Meadow, in which I feed my many herds —

455

HIS steps were most incomprehensible —

I know not how I can describe in words

Those tracks — he could have gone along the sands

Neither upon his feet nor on his hands; —

59.

‘He must have had some other stranger mode

460

Of moving on: those vestiges immense,

Far as I traced them on the sandy road,

Seemed like the trail of oak-toppings:— but thence

No mark nor track denoting where they trod

The hard ground gave:— but, working at his fence,

465

A mortal hedger saw him as he passed

To Pylos, with the cows, in fiery haste.

60.

‘I found that in the dark he quietly

Had sacrificed some cows, and before light

Had thrown the ashes all dispersedly

470

About the road — then, still as gloomy night,

Had crept into his cradle, either eye

Rubbing, and cogitating some new sleight.

No eagle could have seen him as he lay

Hid in his cavern from the peering day.

61.
475

‘I taxed him with the fact, when he averred

Most solemnly that he did neither see

Nor even had in any manner heard

Of my lost cows, whatever things cows be;

Nor could he tell, though offered a reward,

480

Not even who could tell of them to me.’

So speaking, Phoebus sate; and Hermes then

Addressed the Supreme Lord of Gods and Men:—

62.

‘Great Father, you know clearly beforehand

That all which I shall say to you is sooth;

485

I am a most veracious person, and

Totally unacquainted with untruth.

At sunrise Phoebus came, but with no band

Of Gods to bear him witness, in great wrath,

To my abode, seeking his heifers there,

490

And saying that I must show him where they are,

63.

‘Or he would hurl me down the dark abyss.

I know that every Apollonian limb

Is clothed with speed and might and manliness,

As a green bank with flowers — but unlike him

495

I was born yesterday, and you may guess

He well knew this when he indulged the whim

Of bullying a poor little new-born thing

That slept, and never thought of cow-driving.

64.

‘Am I like a strong fellow who steals kine?

500

Believe me, dearest Father — such you are —

This driving of the herds is none of mine;

Across my threshold did I wander ne’er,

So may I thrive! I reverence the divine

Sun and the Gods, and I love you, and care

505

Even for this hard accuser — who must know

I am as innocent as they or you.

65.

‘I swear by these most gloriously-wrought portals

(It is, you will allow, an oath of might)

Through which the multitude of the Immortals

510

Pass and repass forever, day and night,

Devising schemes for the affairs of mortals —

I am guiltless; and I will requite,

Although mine enemy be great and strong,

His cruel threat — do thou defend the young!’

66.
515

So speaking, the Cyllenian Argiphont

Winked, as if now his adversary was fitted:—

And Jupiter, according to his wont,

Laughed heartily to hear the subtle-witted

Infant give such a plausible account,

520

And every word a lie. But he remitted

Judgement at present — and his exhortation

Was, to compose the affair by arbitration.

67.

And they by mighty Jupiter were bidden

To go forth with a single purpose both,

525

Neither the other chiding nor yet chidden:

And Mercury with innocence and truth

To lead the way, and show where he had hidden

The mighty heifers. — Hermes, nothing loth,

Obeyed the Aegis-bearer’s will — for he

530

Is able to persuade all easily.

68.

These lovely children of Heaven’s highest Lord

Hastened to Pylos and the pastures wide

And lofty stalls by the Alphean ford,

Where wealth in the mute night is multiplied

535

With silent growth. Whilst Hermes drove the herd

Out of the stony cavern, Phoebus spied

The hides of those the little babe had slain,

Stretched on the precipice above the plain.

69.

‘How was it possible,’ then Phoebus said,

540

‘That you, a little child, born yesterday,

A thing on mother’s milk and kisses fed,

Could two prodigious heifers ever flay?

Even I myself may well hereafter dread

Your prowess, offspring of Cyllenian May,

545

When you grow strong and tall.’— He spoke, and bound

Stiff withy bands the infant’s wrists around.

70.

He might as well have bound the oxen wild;

The withy bands, though starkly interknit,

Fell at the feet of the immortal child,

550

Loosened by some device of his quick wit.

Phoebus perceived himself again beguiled,

And stared — while Hermes sought some hole or pit,

Looking askance and winking fast as thought,

Where he might hide himself and not be caught.

71.
555

Sudden he changed his plan, and with strange skill

Subdued the strong Latonian, by the might

Of winning music, to his mightier will;

His left hand held the lyre, and in his right

The plectrum struck the chords — unconquerable

560

Up from beneath his hand in circling flight

The gathering music rose — and sweet as Love

The penetrating notes did live and move

72.

Within the heart of great Apollo — he

Listened with all his soul, and laughed for pleasure.

565

Close to his side stood harping fearlessly

The unabashed boy; and to the measure

Of the sweet lyre, there followed loud and free

His joyous voice; for he unlocked the treasure

Of his deep song, illustrating the birth

570

Of the bright Gods, and the dark desert Earth:

73.

And how to the Immortals every one

A portion was assigned of all that is;

But chief Mnemosyne did Maia’s son

Clothe in the light of his loud melodies; —

575

And, as each God was born or had begun,

He in their order due and fit degrees

Sung of his birth and being — and did move

Apollo to unutterable love.

74.

These words were winged with his swift delight:

580

‘You heifer-stealing schemer, well do you

Deserve that fifty oxen should requite

Such minstrelsies as I have heard even now.

Comrade of feasts, little contriving wight,

One of your secrets I would gladly know,

585

Whether the glorious power you now show forth

Was folded up within you at your birth,

75.

‘Or whether mortal taught or God inspired

The power of unpremeditated song?

Many divinest sounds have I admired,

590

The Olympian Gods and mortal men among;

But such a strain of wondrous, strange, untired,

And soul-awakening music, sweet and strong,

Yet did I never hear except from thee,

Offspring of May, impostor Mercury!

76.
595

‘What Muse, what skill, what unimagined use,

What exercise of subtlest art, has given

Thy songs such power? — for those who hear may choose

From three, the choicest of the gifts of Heaven,

Delight, and love, and sleep — sweet sleep, whose dews

600

Are sweeter than the balmy tears of even:—

And I, who speak this praise, am that Apollo

Whom the Olympian Muses ever follow:

77.

‘And their delight is dance, and the blithe noise

Of song and overflowing poesy;

605

And sweet, even as desire, the liquid voice

Of pipes, that fills the clear air thrillingly;

But never did my inmost soul rejoice

In this dear work of youthful revelry

As now. I wonder at thee, son of Jove;

610

Thy harpings and thy song are soft as love.

78.

‘Now since thou hast, although so very small,

Science of arts so glorious, thus I swear —

And let this cornel javelin, keen and tall,

Witness between us what I promise here —

615

That I will lead thee to the Olympian Hall,

Honoured and mighty, with thy mother dear,

And many glorious gifts in joy will give thee,

And even at the end will ne’er deceive thee.’

79.

To whom thus Mercury with prudent speech:—

620

‘Wisely hast thou inquired of my skill:

I envy thee no thing I know to teach

Even this day:— for both in word and will

I would be gentle with thee; thou canst reach

All things in thy wise spirit, and thy sill

625

Is highest in Heaven among the sons of Jove,

Who loves thee in the fulness of his love.

80.

‘The Counsellor Supreme has given to thee

Divinest gifts, out of the amplitude

Of his profuse exhaustless treasury;

630

By thee, ’tis said, the depths are understood

Of his far voice; by thee the mystery

Of all oracular fates — and the dread mood

Of the diviner is breathed up; even I—

A child — perceive thy might and majesty.

81.
635

‘Thou canst seek out and compass all that wit

Can find or teach; — yet since thou wilt, come take

The lyre — be mine the glory giving it —

Strike the sweet chords, and sing aloud, and wake

Thy joyous pleasure out of many a fit

640

Of tranced sound — and with fleet fingers make

Thy liquid-voiced comrade talk with thee —

It can talk measured music eloquently.

82.

‘Then bear it boldly to the revel loud,

Love-wakening dance, or feast of solemn state,

645

A joy by night or day — for those endowed

With art and wisdom who interrogate

It teaches, babbling in delightful mood

All things which make the spirit most elate,

Soothing the mind with sweet familiar play,

650

Chasing the heavy shadows of dismay.

83.

‘To those who are unskilled in its sweet tongue,

Though they should question most impetuously

Its hidden soul, it gossips something wrong —

Some senseless and impertinent reply.

655

But thou who art as wise as thou art strong

Canst compass all that thou desirest. I

Present thee with this music-flowing shell,

Knowing thou canst interrogate it well.

84.

‘And let us two henceforth together feed,

660

On this green mountain-slope and pastoral plain,

The herds in litigation — they will breed

Quickly enough to recompense our pain,

If to the bulls and cows we take good heed; —

And thou, though somewhat over fond of gain,

665

Grudge me not half the profit.’— Having spoke,

The shell he proffered, and Apollo took;

85.

And gave him in return the glittering lash,

Installing him as herdsman; — from the look

Of Mercury then laughed a joyous flash.

670

And then Apollo with the plectrum strook

The chords, and from beneath his hands a crash

Of mighty sounds rushed up, whose music shook

The soul with sweetness, and like an adept

His sweeter voice a just accordance kept.

86.
675

The herd went wandering o’er the divine mead,

Whilst these most beautiful Sons of Jupiter

Won their swift way up to the snowy head

Of white Olympus, with the joyous lyre

Soothing their journey; and their father dread

680

Gathered them both into familiar

Affection sweet — and then, and now, and ever,

Hermes must love Him of the Golden Quiver,

87.

To whom he gave the lyre that sweetly sounded,

Which skilfully he held and played thereon.

685

He piped the while, and far and wide rebounded

The echo of his pipings; every one

Of the Olympians sat with joy astounded;

While he conceived another piece of fun,

One of his old tricks — which the God of Day

690

Perceiving, said:—‘I fear thee, Son of May; —

88.

‘I fear thee and thy sly chameleon spirit,

Lest thou should steal my lyre and crooked bow;

This glory and power thou dost from Jove inherit,

To teach all craft upon the earth below;

695

Thieves love and worship thee — it is thy merit

To make all mortal business ebb and flow

By roguery:— now, Hermes, if you dare

By sacred Styx a mighty oath to swear

89.

‘That you will never rob me, you will do

700

A thing extremely pleasing to my heart.’

Then Mercury swore by the Stygian dew,

That he would never steal his bow or dart,

Or lay his hands on what to him was due,

Or ever would employ his powerful art

705

Against his Pythian fane. Then Phoebus swore

There was no God or Man whom he loved more.

90.

‘And I will give thee as a good-will token,

The beautiful wand of wealth and happiness;

A perfect three-leaved rod of gold unbroken,

710

Whose magic will thy footsteps ever bless;

And whatsoever by Jove’s voice is spoken

Of earthly or divine from its recess,

It, like a loving soul, to thee will speak,

And more than this, do thou forbear to seek.

91.
715

‘For, dearest child, the divinations high

Which thou requirest, ’tis unlawful ever

That thou, or any other deity

Should understand — and vain were the endeavour;

For they are hidden in Jove’s mind, and I,

720

In trust of them, have sworn that I would never

Betray the counsels of Jove’s inmost will

To any God — the oath was terrible.

92.

‘Then, golden-wanded brother, ask me not

To speak the fates by Jupiter designed;

725

But be it mine to tell their various lot

To the unnumbered tribes of human-kind.

Let good to these, and ill to those be wrought

As I dispense — but he who comes consigned

By voice and wings of perfect augury

730

To my great shrine, shall find avail in me.

93.

‘Him will I not deceive, but will assist;

But he who comes relying on such birds

As chatter vainly, who would strain and twist

The purpose of the Gods with idle words,

735

And deems their knowledge light, he shall have missed

His road — whilst I among my other hoards

His gifts deposit. Yet, O son of May,

I have another wondrous thing to say.

96.

‘There are three Fates, three virgin Sisters, who

740

Rejoicing in their wind-outspeeding wings,

Their heads with flour snowed over white and new,

Sit in a vale round which Parnassus flings

Its circling skirts — from these I have learned true

Vaticinations of remotest things.

745

My father cared not. Whilst they search out dooms,

They sit apart and feed on honeycombs.

95.

‘They, having eaten the fresh honey, grow

Drunk with divine enthusiasm, and utter

With earnest willingness the truth they know;

750

But if deprived of that sweet food, they mutter

All plausible delusions; — these to you

I give; — if you inquire, they will not stutter;

Delight your own soul with them:— any man

You would instruct may profit if he can.

96.
755

‘Take these and the fierce oxen, Maia’s child —

O’er many a horse and toil-enduring mule,

O’er jagged-jawed lions, and the wild

White-tusked boars, o’er all, by field or pool,

Of cattle which the mighty Mother mild

760

Nourishes in her bosom, thou shalt rule —

Thou dost alone the veil from death uplift —

Thou givest not — yet this is a great gift.’

97.

Thus King Apollo loved the child of May

In truth, and Jove covered their love with joy.

765

Hermes with Gods and Men even from that day

Mingled, and wrought the latter much annoy,

And little profit, going far astray

Through the dun night. Farewell, delightful Boy,

Of Jove and Maia sprung — never by me,

770

Nor thou, nor other songs, shall unremembered be.

[Published by Mrs. Shelley, “Posthumous Poems”, 1824. This alone of the “Translations” is included in the Harvard manuscript book. ‘Fragments of the drafts of this and the other Hymns of Homer exist among the Boscombe manuscripts’ (Forman).]

_13 cow-stealing]qy. cattle-stealing?

_57 stony Boscombe manuscript. Harvard manuscript; strong edition 1824.

_252 neighbouring]neighbour Harvard manuscript.

_336 hurl Harvard manuscript, editions 1839; haul edition 1824.

_402 Round]Roused edition 1824 only.

_488 wrath]ruth Harvard manuscript.

_580 heifer-stealing]heifer-killing Harvard manuscript.

_673 and like 1839, 1st edition; as of edition 1824, Harvard manuscript.

_713 loving]living cj. Rossetti.

_761 from Harvard manuscript; of editions 1824, 1839.

_764 their love with joy Harvard manuscript; them with love and joy, editions 1824, 1839.

_767 going]wandering Harvard manuscript.

Homer’s Hymn to Castor and Pollux.

Ye wild-eyed Muses, sing the Twins of Jove,

Whom the fair-ankled Leda, mixed in love

With mighty Saturn’s Heaven-obscuring Child,

On Taygetus, that lofty mountain wild,

5

Brought forth in joy: mild Pollux, void of blame,

And steed-subduing Castor, heirs of fame.

These are the Powers who earth-born mortals save

And ships, whose flight is swift along the wave.

When wintry tempests o’er the savage sea

10

Are raging, and the sailors tremblingly

Call on the Twins of Jove with prayer and vow,

Gathered in fear upon the lofty prow,

And sacrifice with snow-white lambs — the wind

And the huge billow bursting close behind,

15

Even then beneath the weltering waters bear

The staggering ship — they suddenly appear,

On yellow wings rushing athwart the sky,

And lull the blasts in mute tranquillity,

And strew the waves on the white Ocean’s bed,

20

Fair omen of the voyage; from toil and dread

The sailors rest, rejoicing in the sight,

And plough the quiet sea in safe delight.

[Published by Mrs. Shelley, “Poetical Works”, 1839, 2nd edition; dated 1818.]

_6 steed-subduing emend. Rossetti; steel-subduing 1839, 2nd edition.

Homer’s Hymn to the Moon.

Daughters of Jove, whose voice is melody,

Muses, who know and rule all minstrelsy

Sing the wide-winged Moon! Around the earth,

From her immortal head in Heaven shot forth,

5

Far light is scattered — boundless glory springs;

Where’er she spreads her many-beaming wings

The lampless air glows round her golden crown.

But when the Moon divine from Heaven is gone

Under the sea, her beams within abide,

10

Till, bathing her bright limbs in Ocean’s tide,

Clothing her form in garments glittering far,

And having yoked to her immortal car

The beam-invested steeds whose necks on high

Curve back, she drives to a remoter sky

15

A western Crescent, borne impetuously.

Then is made full the circle of her light,

And as she grows, her beams more bright and bright

Are poured from Heaven, where she is hovering then,

A wonder and a sign to mortal men.

20

The Son of Saturn with this glorious Power

Mingled in love and sleep — to whom she bore

Pandeia, a bright maid of beauty rare

Among the Gods, whose lives eternal are.

Hail Queen, great Moon, white-armed Divinity,

25

Fair-haired and favourable! thus with thee

My song beginning, by its music sweet

Shall make immortal many a glorious feat

Of demigods, with lovely lips, so well

Which minstrels, servants of the Muses, tell.

[Published by Mrs. Shelley, “Poetical Works”, 1839, 2nd edition; dated 1818.]

Homer’s Hymn to the Sun.

Offspring of Jove, Calliope, once more

To the bright Sun, thy hymn of music pour;

Whom to the child of star-clad Heaven and Earth

Euryphaessa, large-eyed nymph, brought forth;

5

Euryphaessa, the famed sister fair

Of great Hyperion, who to him did bear

A race of loveliest children; the young Morn,

Whose arms are like twin roses newly born,

The fair-haired Moon, and the immortal Sun,

10

Who borne by heavenly steeds his race doth run

Unconquerably, illuming the abodes

Of mortal Men and the eternal Gods.

Fiercely look forth his awe-inspiring eyes,

Beneath his golden helmet, whence arise

15

And are shot forth afar, clear beams of light;

His countenance, with radiant glory bright,

Beneath his graceful locks far shines around,

And the light vest with which his limbs are bound,

Of woof aethereal delicately twined,

20

Glows in the stream of the uplifting wind.

His rapid steeds soon bear him to the West;

Where their steep flight his hands divine arrest,

And the fleet car with yoke of gold, which he

Sends from bright Heaven beneath the shadowy sea.

[Published by Mrs. Shelley, “Poetical Works”, 1839, 2nd edition; dated 1818.]

Homer’s Hymn to the Earth: Mother of All.

O universal Mother, who dost keep

From everlasting thy foundations deep,

Eldest of things, Great Earth, I sing of thee!

All shapes that have their dwelling in the sea,

5

All things that fly, or on the ground divine

Live, move, and there are nourished — these are thine;

These from thy wealth thou dost sustain; from thee

Fair babes are born, and fruits on every tree

Hang ripe and large, revered Divinity!

10

The life of mortal men beneath thy sway

Is held; thy power both gives and takes away!

Happy are they whom thy mild favours nourish;

All things unstinted round them grow and flourish.

For them, endures the life-sustaining field

15

Its load of harvest, and their cattle yield

Large increase, and their house with wealth is filled.

Such honoured dwell in cities fair and free,

The homes of lovely women, prosperously;

Their sons exult in youth’s new budding gladness,

20

And their fresh daughters free from care or sadness,

With bloom-inwoven dance and happy song,

On the soft flowers the meadow-grass among,

Leap round them sporting — such delights by thee

Are given, rich Power, revered Divinity.

25

Mother of gods, thou Wife of starry Heaven,

Farewell! be thou propitious, and be given

A happy life for this brief melody,

Nor thou nor other songs shall unremembered be.

[Published by Mrs. Shelley, “Poetical Works”, 1839, 2nd edition; dated 1818.]

Homer’s Hymn to Minerva.

I sing the glorious Power with azure eyes,

Athenian Pallas! tameless, chaste, and wise,

Tritogenia, town-preserving Maid,

Revered and mighty; from his awful head

5

Whom Jove brought forth, in warlike armour dressed,

Golden, all radiant! wonder strange possessed

The everlasting Gods that Shape to see,

Shaking a javelin keen, impetuously

Rush from the crest of Aegis-bearing Jove;

10

Fearfully Heaven was shaken, and did move

Beneath the might of the Cerulean-eyed;

Earth dreadfully resounded, far and wide;

And, lifted from its depths, the sea swelled high

In purple billows, the tide suddenly

15

Stood still, and great Hyperion’s son long time

Checked his swift steeds, till, where she stood sublime,

Pallas from her immortal shoulders threw

The arms divine; wise Jove rejoiced to view.

Child of the Aegis-bearer, hail to thee,

20

Nor thine nor others’ praise shall unremembered be.

[Published by Mrs. Shelley, “Poetical Works”, 1839, 2nd edition; dated 1818.]

Homer’s Hymn to Venus.

Muse, sing the deeds of golden Aphrodite,

Who wakens with her smile the lulled delight

Of sweet desire, taming the eternal kings

Of Heaven, and men, and all the living things

5

That fleet along the air, or whom the sea,

Or earth, with her maternal ministry,

Nourish innumerable, thy delight

All seek . . . O crowned Aphrodite!

Three spirits canst thou not deceive or quell:—

10

Minerva, child of Jove, who loves too well

Fierce war and mingling combat, and the fame

Of glorious deeds, to heed thy gentle flame.

Diana . . . golden-shafted queen,

Is tamed not by thy smiles; the shadows green

15

Of the wild woods, the bow, the . . .

And piercing cries amid the swift pursuit

Of beasts among waste mountains — such delight

Is hers, and men who know and do the right.

Nor Saturn’s first-born daughter, Vesta chaste,

20

Whom Neptune and Apollo wooed the last,

Such was the will of aegis-bearing Jove;

But sternly she refused the ills of Love,

And by her mighty Father’s head she swore

An oath not unperformed, that evermore

25

A virgin she would live mid deities

Divine: her father, for such gentle ties

Renounced, gave glorious gifts — thus in his hall

She sits and feeds luxuriously. O’er all

In every fane, her honours first arise

30

From men — the eldest of Divinities.

These spirits she persuades not, nor deceives,

But none beside escape, so well she weaves

Her unseen toils; nor mortal men, nor gods

Who live secure in their unseen abodes.

35

She won the soul of him whose fierce delight

Is thunder — first in glory and in might.

And, as she willed, his mighty mind deceiving,

With mortal limbs his deathless limbs inweaving,

Concealed him from his spouse and sister fair,

40

Whom to wise Saturn ancient Rhea bare.

but in return,

In Venus Jove did soft desire awaken,

That by her own enchantments overtaken,

She might, no more from human union free,

45

Burn for a nursling of mortality.

For once amid the assembled Deities,

The laughter-loving Venus from her eyes

Shot forth the light of a soft starlight smile,

And boasting said, that she, secure the while,

50

Could bring at Will to the assembled Gods

The mortal tenants of earth’s dark abodes,

And mortal offspring from a deathless stem

She could produce in scorn and spite of them.

Therefore he poured desire into her breast

55

Of young Anchises,

Feeding his herds among the mossy fountains

Of the wide Ida’s many-folded mountains —

Whom Venus saw, and loved, and the love clung

Like wasting fire her senses wild among.

[Published by Garnett, “Relics of Shelley”, 1862; dated 1818.]

[VERSES 1-55, WITH SOME OMISSIONS.]

The Cyclops.

A Satyric Drama Translated From the Greek of Euripides.

SILENUS.

ULYSSES.

CHORUS OF SATYRS.

THE CYCLOPS.

SILENUS:

O Bacchus, what a world of toil, both now

And ere these limbs were overworn with age,

Have I endured for thee! First, when thou fled’st

The mountain-nymphs who nursed thee, driven afar

5

By the strange madness Juno sent upon thee;

Then in the battle of the Sons of Earth,

When I stood foot by foot close to thy side,

No unpropitious fellow-combatant,

And, driving through his shield my winged spear,

10

Slew vast Enceladus. Consider now,

Is it a dream of which I speak to thee?

By Jove it is not, for you have the trophies!

And now I suffer more than all before.

For when I heard that Juno had devised

15

A tedious voyage for you, I put to sea

With all my children quaint in search of you,

And I myself stood on the beaked prow

And fixed the naked mast; and all my boys

Leaning upon their oars, with splash and strain

20

Made white with foam the green and purple sea —

And so we sought you, king. We were sailing

Near Malea, when an eastern wind arose,

And drove us to this waste Aetnean rock;

The one-eyed children of the Ocean God,

25

The man-destroying Cyclopses, inhabit,

On this wild shore, their solitary caves,

And one of these, named Polypheme. has caught us

To be his slaves; and so, for all delight

Of Bacchic sports, sweet dance and melody,

30

We keep this lawless giant’s wandering flocks.

My sons indeed on far declivities,

Young things themselves, tend on the youngling sheep,

But I remain to fill the water-casks,

Or sweeping the hard floor, or ministering

35

Some impious and abominable meal

To the fell Cyclops. I am wearied of it!

And now I must scrape up the littered floor

With this great iron rake, so to receive

My absent master and his evening sheep

40

In a cave neat and clean. Even now I see

My children tending the flocks hitherward.

Ha! what is this? are your Sicinnian measures

Even now the same, as when with dance and song

You brought young Bacchus to Althaea’s halls?

CHORUS OF SATYRS:

STROPHE:

45

Where has he of race divine

Wandered in the winding rocks?

Here the air is calm and fine

For the father of the flocks; —

Here the grass is soft and sweet,

50

And the river-eddies meet

In the trough beside the cave,

Bright as in their fountain wave. —

Neither here, nor on the dew

Of the lawny uplands feeding?

55

Oh, you come! — a stone at you

Will I throw to mend your breeding; —

Get along, you horned thing,

Wild, seditious, rambling!

EPODE:

An Iacchic melody

60

To the golden Aphrodite

Will I lift, as erst did I

Seeking her and her delight

With the Maenads, whose white feet

To the music glance and fleet.

65

Bacchus, O beloved, where,

Shaking wide thy yellow hair,

Wanderest thou alone, afar?

To the one-eyed Cyclops, we,

Who by right thy servants are,

70

Minister in misery,

In these wretched goat-skins clad,

Far from thy delights and thee.

SILENUS:

Be silent, sons; command the slaves to drive

The gathered flocks into the rock-roofed cave.

CHORUS:

75

Go! But what needs this serious haste, O father?

SILENUS:

I see a Grecian vessel on the coast,

And thence the rowers with some general

Approaching to this cave. — About their necks

Hang empty vessels, as they wanted food,

80

And water-flasks. — Oh, miserable strangers!

Whence come they, that they know not what and who

My master is, approaching in ill hour

The inhospitable roof of Polypheme,

And the Cyclopian jaw-bone, man-destroying?

85

Be silent, Satyrs, while I ask and hear

Whence coming, they arrive the Aetnean hill.

ULYSSES:

Friends, can you show me some clear water-spring,

The remedy of our thirst? Will any one

Furnish with food seamen in want of it?

90

Ha! what is this? We seem to be arrived

At the blithe court of Bacchus. I observe

This sportive band of Satyrs near the caves.

First let me greet the elder. — Hail!

SILENUS:

Hail thou,

O Stranger! tell thy country and thy race.

ULYSSES:

95

The Ithacan Ulysses and the king

Of Cephalonia.

SILENUS:

Oh! I know the man,

Wordy and shrewd, the son of Sisyphus.

ULYSSES:

I am the same, but do not rail upon me. —

SILENUS:

Whence sailing do you come to Sicily?

ULYSSES:

100

From Ilion, and from the Trojan toils.

SILENUS:

How, touched you not at your paternal shore?

ULYSSES:

The strength of tempests bore me here by force.

SILENUS:

The self-same accident occurred to me.

ULYSSES:

Were you then driven here by stress of weather?

SILENUS:

105

Following the Pirates who had kidnapped Bacchus.

ULYSSES:

What land is this, and who inhabit it? —

SILENUS:

Aetna, the loftiest peak in Sicily.

ULYSSES:

And are there walls, and tower-surrounded towns?

SILENUS:

There are not. — These lone rocks are bare of men.

ULYSSES:

110

And who possess the land? the race of beasts?

SILENUS:

Cyclops, who live in caverns, not in houses.

ULYSSES:

Obeying whom? Or is the state popular?

SILENUS:

Shepherds: no one obeys any in aught.

ULYSSES:

How live they? do they sow the corn of Ceres?

SILENUS:

115

On milk and cheese, and on the flesh of sheep.

ULYSSES:

Have they the Bromian drink from the vine’s stream?

SILENUS:

Ah! no; they live in an ungracious land.

ULYSSES:

And are they just to strangers? — hospitable?

SILENUS:

They think the sweetest thing a stranger brings

Is his own flesh.

ULYSSES:

120

What! do they eat man’s flesh?

SILENUS:

No one comes here who is not eaten up.

ULYSSES:

The Cyclops now — where is he? Not at home?

SILENUS:

Absent on Aetna, hunting with his dogs.

ULYSSES:

Know’st thou what thou must do to aid us hence?

SILENUS:

125

I know not: we will help you all we can.

ULYSSES:

Provide us food, of which we are in want.

SILENUS:

Here is not anything, as I said, but meat.

ULYSSES:

But meat is a sweet remedy for hunger.

SILENUS:

Cow’s milk there is, and store of curdled cheese.

ULYSSES:

130

Bring out:— I would see all before I bargain.

SILENUS:

But how much gold will you engage to give?

ULYSSES:

I bring no gold, but Bacchic juice.

SILENUS:

Oh, joy!

Tis long since these dry lips were wet with wine.

ULYSSES:

Maron, the son of the God, gave it me.

SILENUS:

135

Whom I have nursed a baby in my arms.

ULYSSES:

The son of Bacchus, for your clearer knowledge.

SILENUS:

Have you it now? — or is it in the ship?

ULYSSES:

Old man, this skin contains it, which you see.

SILENUS:

Why, this would hardly be a mouthful for me.

ULYSSES:

140

Nay, twice as much as you can draw from thence.

SILENUS:

You speak of a fair fountain, sweet to me.

ULYSSES:

Would you first taste of the unmingled wine?

SILENUS:

’Tis just — tasting invites the purchaser.

ULYSSES:

Here is the cup, together with the skin.

SILENUS:

Pour: that the draught may fillip my remembrance.

ULYSSES:

145

See!

SILENUS:

Papaiapax! what a sweet smell it has!

ULYSSES:

You see it then? —

SILENUS:

By Jove, no! but I smell it.

ULYSSES:

Taste, that you may not praise it in words only.

SILENUS:

Babai! Great Bacchus calls me forth to dance!

Joy! joy!

ULYSSES:

150

Did it flow sweetly down your throat?

SILENUS:

So that it tingled to my very nails.

ULYSSES:

And in addition I will give you gold.

SILENUS:

Let gold alone! only unlock the cask.

ULYSSES:

Bring out some cheeses now, or a young goat.

SILENUS:

155

That will I do, despising any master.

Yes, let me drink one cup, and I will give

All that the Cyclops feed upon their mountains.

. . .

CHORUS:

Ye have taken Troy and laid your hands on Helen?

ULYSSES:

And utterly destroyed the race of Priam.

. . .

SILENUS:

160

The wanton wretch! she was bewitched to see

The many-coloured anklets and the chain

Of woven gold which girt the neck of Paris,

And so she left that good man Menelaus.

There should be no more women in the world

165

But such as are reserved for me alone. —

See, here are sheep, and here are goats, Ulysses,

Here are unsparing cheeses of pressed milk;

Take them; depart with what good speed ye may;

First leaving my reward, the Bacchic dew

Of joy-inspiring grapes.

ULYSSES:

170

Ah me! Alas!

What shall we do? the Cyclops is at hand!

Old man, we perish! whither can we fly?

SILENUS:

Hide yourselves quick within that hollow rock.

ULYSSES:

’Twere perilous to fly into the net.

SILENUS:

175

The cavern has recesses numberless;

Hide yourselves quick.

ULYSSES:

That will I never do!

The mighty Troy would be indeed disgraced

If I should fly one man. How many times

Have I withstood, with shield immovable.

180

Ten thousand Phrygians! — if I needs must die,

Yet will I die with glory; — if I live,

The praise which I have gained will yet remain.

SILENUS:

What, ho! assistance, comrades, haste, assistance!

[THE CYCLOPS, SILENUS, ULYSSES; CHORUS.]

CYCLOPS:

What is this tumult? Bacchus is not here,

185

Nor tympanies nor brazen castanets.

How are my young lambs in the cavern? Milking

Their dams or playing by their sides? And is

The new cheese pressed into the bulrush baskets?

Speak! I’ll beat some of you till you rain tears —

190

Look up, not downwards when I speak to you.

SILENUS:

See! I now gape at Jupiter himself;

I stare upon Orion and the stars.

CYCLOPS:

Well, is the dinner fitly cooked and laid?

SILENUS:

All ready, if your throat is ready too.

CYCLOPS:

Are the bowls full of milk besides?

SILENUS:

195

O’er-brimming;

So you may drink a tunful if you will.

CYCLOPS:

Is it ewe’s milk or cow’s milk, or both mixed? —

SILENUS:

Both, either; only pray don’t swallow me.

CYCLOPS:

By no means. —

. . .

200

What is this crowd I see beside the stalls?

Outlaws or thieves? for near my cavern-home

I see my young lambs coupled two by two

With willow bands; mixed with my cheeses lie

Their implements; and this old fellow here

Has his bald head broken with stripes.

SILENUS:

205

Ah me!

I have been beaten till I burn with fever.

CYCLOPS:

By whom? Who laid his fist upon your head?

SILENUS:

Those men, because I would not suffer them

To steal your goods.

CYCLOPS:

Did not the rascals know

210

I am a God, sprung from the race of Heaven?

SILENUS:

I told them so, but they bore off your things,

And ate the cheese in spite of all I said,

And carried out the lambs — and said, moreover,

They’d pin you down with a three-cubit collar,

215

And pull your vitals out through your one eye,

Furrow your back with stripes, then, binding you,

Throw you as ballast into the ship’s hold,

And then deliver you, a slave, to move

Enormous rocks, or found a vestibule.

CYCLOPS:

In truth? Nay, haste, and place in order quickly

221

The cooking-knives, and heap upon the hearth,

And kindle it, a great faggot of wood. —

As soon as they are slaughtered, they shall fill

My belly, broiling warm from the live coals,

225

Or boiled and seethed within the bubbling caldron.

I am quite sick of the wild mountain game;

Of stags and lions I have gorged enough,

And I grow hungry for the flesh of men.

SILENUS:

Nay, master, something new is very pleasant

230

After one thing forever, and of late

Very few strangers have approached our cave.

ULYSSES:

Hear, Cyclops, a plain tale on the other side.

We, wanting to buy food, came from our ship

Into the neighbourhood of your cave, and here

235

This old Silenus gave us in exchange

These lambs for wine, the which he took and drank,

And all by mutual compact, without force.

There is no word of truth in what he says,

For slyly he was selling all your store.

SILENUS:

I? May you perish, wretch —

ULYSSES:

240

If I speak false!

SILENUS:

Cyclops, I swear by Neptune who begot thee,

By mighty Triton and by Nereus old,

Calypso and the glaucous Ocean Nymphs,

The sacred waves and all the race of fishes —

245

Be these the witnesses, my dear sweet master,

My darling little Cyclops, that I never

Gave any of your stores to these false strangers; —

If I speak false may those whom most I love,

My children, perish wretchedly!

CHORUS:

There stop!

250

I saw him giving these things to the strangers.

If I speak false, then may my father perish,

But do not thou wrong hospitality.

CYCLOPS:

You lie! I swear that he is juster far

Than Rhadamanthus — I trust more in him.

255

But let me ask, whence have ye sailed, O strangers?

Who are you? And what city nourished ye?

ULYSSES:

Our race is Ithacan — having destroyed

The town of Troy, the tempests of the sea

Have driven us on thy land, O Polypheme.

CYCLOPS:

260

What, have ye shared in the unenvied spoil

Of the false Helen, near Scamander’s stream?

ULYSSES:

The same, having endured a woful toil.

CYCLOPS:

Oh, basest expedition! sailed ye not

From Greece to Phrygia for one woman’s sake?

ULYSSES:

265

’Twas the Gods’ work — no mortal was in fault.

But, O great Offspring of the Ocean-King,

We pray thee and admonish thee with freedom,

That thou dost spare thy friends who visit thee,

And place no impious food within thy jaws.

270

For in the depths of Greece we have upreared

Temples to thy great Father, which are all

His homes. The sacred bay of Taenarus

Remains inviolate, and each dim recess

Scooped high on the Malean promontory,

275

And aery Sunium’s silver-veined crag,

Which divine Pallas keeps unprofaned ever,

The Gerastian asylums, and whate’er

Within wide Greece our enterprise has kept

From Phrygian contumely; and in which

280

You have a common care, for you inhabit

The skirts of Grecian land, under the roots

Of Aetna and its crags, spotted with fire.

Turn then to converse under human laws,

Receive us shipwrecked suppliants, and provide

285

Food, clothes, and fire, and hospitable gifts;

Nor fixing upon oxen-piercing spits

Our limbs, so fill your belly and your jaws.

Priam’s wide land has widowed Greece enough;

And weapon-winged murder leaped together

290

Enough of dead, and wives are husbandless,

And ancient women and gray fathers wail

Their childless age; — if you should roast the rest —

And ’tis a bitter feast that you prepare —

Where then would any turn? Yet be persuaded;

295

Forgo the lust of your jaw-bone; prefer

Pious humanity to wicked will:

Many have bought too dear their evil joys.

SILENUS:

Let me advise you, do not spare a morsel

Of all his flesh. If you should eat his tongue

300

You would become most eloquent, O Cyclops.

CYCLOPS:

Wealth, my good fellow, is the wise man’s God,

All other things are a pretence and boast.

What are my father’s ocean promontories,

The sacred rocks whereon he dwells, to me?

305

Stranger, I laugh to scorn Jove’s thunderbolt,

I know not that his strength is more than mine.

As to the rest I care not. — When he pours

Rain from above, I have a close pavilion

Under this rock, in which I lie supine,

310

Feasting on a roast calf or some wild beast,

And drinking pans of milk, and gloriously

Emulating the thunder of high Heaven.

And when the Thracian wind pours down the snow,

I wrap my body in the skins of beasts,

315

Kindle a fire, and bid the snow whirl on.

The earth, by force, whether it will or no,

Bringing forth grass, fattens my flocks and herds,

Which, to what other God but to myself

And this great belly, first of deities,

320

Should I be bound to sacrifice? I well know

The wise man’s only Jupiter is this,

To eat and drink during his little day,

And give himself no care. And as for those

Who complicate with laws the life of man,

325

I freely give them tears for their reward.

I will not cheat my soul of its delight,

Or hesitate in dining upon you:—

And that I may be quit of all demands,

These are my hospitable gifts; — fierce fire

330

And yon ancestral caldron, which o’er-bubbling

Shall finely cook your miserable flesh.

Creep in! —

. . .

ULYSSES:

Ai! ai! I have escaped the Trojan toils,

I have escaped the sea, and now I fall

335

Under the cruel grasp of one impious man.

O Pallas, Mistress, Goddess, sprung from Jove,

Now, now, assist me! Mightier toils than Troy

Are these; — I totter on the chasms of peril; —

And thou who inhabitest the thrones

340

Of the bright stars, look, hospitable Jove,

Upon this outrage of thy deity,

Otherwise be considered as no God!

CHORUS (ALONE):

For your gaping gulf and your gullet wide,

The ravin is ready on every side,

345

The limbs of the strangers are cooked and done;

There is boiled meat, and roast meat, and meat from the coal,

You may chop it, and tear it, and gnash it for fun,

An hairy goat’s-skin contains the whole.

Let me but escape, and ferry me o’er

350

The stream of your wrath to a safer shore.

The Cyclops Aetnean is cruel and bold,

He murders the strangers

That sit on his hearth,

And dreads no avengers

355

To rise from the earth.

He roasts the men before they are cold,

He snatches them broiling from the coal,

And from the caldron pulls them whole,

And minces their flesh and gnaws their bone

360

With his cursed teeth, till all be gone.

Farewell, foul pavilion:

Farewell, rites of dread!

The Cyclops vermilion,

With slaughter uncloying,

365

Now feasts on the dead,

In the flesh of strangers joying!

ULYSSES:

O Jupiter! I saw within the cave

Horrible things; deeds to be feigned in words,

But not to be believed as being done.

CHORUS:

370

What! sawest thou the impious Polypheme

Feasting upon your loved companions now?

ULYSSES:

Selecting two, the plumpest of the crowd,

He grasped them in his hands. —

CHORUS:

Unhappy man!

. . .

ULYSSES:

Soon as we came into this craggy place,

375

Kindling a fire, he cast on the broad hearth

The knotty limbs of an enormous oak,

Three waggon-loads at least, and then he strewed

Upon the ground, beside the red firelight,

His couch of pine-leaves; and he milked the cows,

380

And pouring forth the white milk, filled a bowl

Three cubits wide and four in depth, as much

As would contain ten amphorae, and bound it

With ivy wreaths; then placed upon the fire

A brazen pot to boil, and made red hot

385

The points of spits, not sharpened with the sickle

But with a fruit tree bough, and with the jaws

Of axes for Aetnean slaughterings.

And when this God-abandoned Cook of Hell

Had made all ready, he seized two of us

390

And killed them in a kind of measured manner;

For he flung one against the brazen rivets

Of the huge caldron, and seized the other

By the foot’s tendon, and knocked out his brains

Upon the sharp edge of the craggy stone:

395

Then peeled his flesh with a great cooking-knife

And put him down to roast. The other’s limbs

He chopped into the caldron to be boiled.

And I, with the tears raining from my eyes,

Stood near the Cyclops, ministering to him;

400

The rest, in the recesses of the cave,

Clung to the rock like bats, bloodless with fear.

When he was filled with my companions’ flesh,

He threw himself upon the ground and sent

A loathsome exhalation from his maw.

405

Then a divine thought came to me. I filled

The cup of Maron, and I offered him

To taste, and said:—‘Child of the Ocean God,

Behold what drink the vines of Greece produce,

The exultation and the joy of Bacchus.’

410

He, satiated with his unnatural food,

Received it, and at one draught drank it off,

And taking my hand, praised me:—‘Thou hast given

A sweet draught after a sweet meal, dear guest.’

And I, perceiving that it pleased him, filled

415

Another cup, well knowing that the wine

Would wound him soon and take a sure revenge.

And the charm fascinated him, and I

Plied him cup after cup, until the drink

Had warmed his entrails, and he sang aloud

420

In concert with my wailing fellow-seamen

A hideous discord — and the cavern rung.

I have stolen out, so that if you will

You may achieve my safety and your own.

But say, do you desire, or not, to fly

425

This uncompanionable man, and dwell

As was your wont among the Grecian Nymphs

Within the fanes of your beloved God?

Your father there within agrees to it,

But he is weak and overcome with wine,

430

And caught as if with bird-lime by the cup,

He claps his wings and crows in doting joy.

You who are young escape with me, and find

Bacchus your ancient friend; unsuited he

To this rude Cyclops.

CHORUS:

Oh my dearest friend,

435

That I could see that day, and leave for ever

The impious Cyclops.

. . .

ULYSSES:

Listen then what a punishment I have

For this fell monster, how secure a flight

From your hard servitude.

CHORUS:

O sweeter far

440

Than is the music of an Asian lyre

Would be the news of Polypheme destroyed.

ULYSSES:

Delighted with the Bacchic drink he goes

To call his brother Cyclops — who inhabit

A village upon Aetna not far off.

CHORUS:

445

I understand, catching him when alone

You think by some measure to dispatch him,

Or thrust him from the precipice.

ULYSSES:

Oh no;

Nothing of that kind; my device is subtle.

CHORUS:

How then? I heard of old that thou wert wise.

ULYSSES:

450

I will dissuade him from this plan, by saying

It were unwise to give the Cyclopses

This precious drink, which if enjoyed alone

Would make life sweeter for a longer time.

When, vanquished by the Bacchic power, he sleeps,

455

There is a trunk of olive wood within,

Whose point having made sharp with this good sword

I will conceal in fire, and when I see

It is alight, will fix it, burning yet,

Within the socket of the Cyclops’ eye

460

And melt it out with fire — as when a man

Turns by its handle a great auger round,

Fitting the framework of a ship with beams,

So will I, in the Cyclops’ fiery eye

Turn round the brand and dry the pupil up.

CHORUS:

465

Joy! I am mad with joy at your device.

ULYSSES:

And then with you, my friends, and the old man,

We’ll load the hollow depth of our black ship,

And row with double strokes from this dread shore.

CHORUS:

May I, as in libations to a God,

470

Share in the blinding him with the red brand?

I would have some communion in his death.

ULYSSES:

Doubtless: the brand is a great brand to hold.

CHORUS:

Oh! I would lift an hundred waggon-loads,

If like a wasp’s nest I could scoop the eye out

Of the detested Cyclops.

ULYSSES:

475

Silence now!

Ye know the close device — and when I call,

Look ye obey the masters of the craft.

I will not save myself and leave behind

My comrades in the cave: I might escape,

480

Having got clear from that obscure recess,

But ’twere unjust to leave in jeopardy

The dear companions who sailed here with me.

CHORUS:

Come! who is first, that with his hand

Will urge down the burning brand

485

Through the lids, and quench and pierce

The Cyclops’ eye so fiery fierce?

SEMICHORUS 1 [SONG WITHIN]:

Listen! listen! he is coming,

A most hideous discord humming.

Drunken, museless, awkward, yelling,

490

Far along his rocky dwelling;

Let us with some comic spell

Teach the yet unteachable.

By all means he must be blinded,

If my counsel be but minded.

SEMICHORUS 2:

495

Happy thou made odorous

With the dew which sweet grapes weep,

To the village hastening thus,

Seek the vines that soothe to sleep;

Having first embraced thy friend,

500

Thou in luxury without end,

With the strings of yellow hair,

Of thy voluptuous leman fair,

Shalt sit playing on a bed! —

Speak! what door is opened?

CYCLOPS:

505

Ha! ha! ha! I’m full of wine,

Heavy with the joy divine,

With the young feast oversated;

Like a merchant’s vessel freighted

To the water’s edge, my crop

510

Is laden to the gullet’s top.

The fresh meadow grass of spring

Tempts me forth thus wandering

To my brothers on the mountains,

Who shall share the wine’s sweet fountains.

515

Bring the cask, O stranger, bring!

CHORUS:

One with eyes the fairest

Cometh from his dwelling;

Some one loves thee, rarest

Bright beyond my telling.

520

In thy grace thou shinest

Like some nymph divinest

In her caverns dewy:—

All delights pursue thee,

Soon pied flowers, sweet-breathing,

525

Shall thy head be wreathing.

ULYSSES:

Listen, O Cyclops, for I am well skilled

In Bacchus, whom I gave thee of to drink.

CYCLOPS:

What sort of God is Bacchus then accounted?

ULYSSES:

The greatest among men for joy of life.

CYCLOPS:

530

I gulped him down with very great delight.

ULYSSES:

This is a God who never injures men.

CYCLOPS:

How does the God like living in a skin?

ULYSSES:

He is content wherever he is put.

CYCLOPS:

Gods should not have their body in a skin.

ULYSSES:

535

If he gives joy, what is his skin to you?

CYCLOPS:

I hate the skin, but love the wine within.

ULYSSES:

Stay here now: drink, and make your spirit glad.

CYCLOPS:

Should I not share this liquor with my brothers?

ULYSSES:

Keep it yourself, and be more honoured so.

CYCLOPS:

540

I were more useful, giving to my friends.

ULYSSES:

But village mirth breeds contests, broils, and blows.

CYCLOPS:

When I am drunk none shall lay hands on me. —

ULYSSES:

A drunken man is better within doors.

CYCLOPS:

He is a fool, who drinking, loves not mirth.

ULYSSES:

545

But he is wise, who drunk, remains at home.

CYCLOPS:

What shall I do, Silenus? Shall I stay?

SILENUS:

Stay — for what need have you of pot companions?

CYCLOPS:

Indeed this place is closely carpeted

With flowers and grass.

SILENUS:

And in the sun-warm noon

550

’Tis sweet to drink. Lie down beside me now,

Placing your mighty sides upon the ground.

CYCLOPS:

What do you put the cup behind me for?

SILENUS:

That no one here may touch it.

CYCLOPS:

Thievish One!

You want to drink; — here place it in the midst.

555

And thou, O stranger, tell how art thou called?

ULYSSES:

My name is Nobody. What favour now

Shall I receive to praise you at your hands?

CYCLOPS:

I’ll feast on you the last of your companions.

ULYSSES:

You grant your guest a fair reward, O Cyclops.

CYCLOPS:

560

Ha! what is this? Stealing the wine, you rogue!

SILENUS:

It was this stranger kissing me because

I looked so beautiful.

CYCLOPS:

You shall repent

For kissing the coy wine that loves you not.

SILENUS:

By Jupiter! you said that I am fair.

CYCLOPS:

565

Pour out, and only give me the cup full.

SILENUS:

How is it mixed? let me observe.

CYCLOPS:

Curse you!

Give it me so.

SILENUS:

Not till I see you wear

That coronal, and taste the cup to you.

CYCLOPS:

Thou wily traitor!

SILENUS:

But the wine is sweet.

570

Ay, you will roar if you are caught in drinking.

CYCLOPS:

See now, my lip is clean and all my beard.

SILENUS:

Now put your elbow right and drink again.

As you see me drink — . . .

CYCLOPS:

How now?

SILENUS:

Ye Gods, what a delicious gulp!

CYCLOPS:

575

Guest, take it; — you pour out the wine for me.

ULYSSES:

The wine is well accustomed to my hand.

CYCLOPS:

Pour out the wine!

ULYSSES:

I pour; only be silent.

CYCLOPS:

Silence is a hard task to him who drinks.

ULYSSES:

Take it and drink it off; leave not a dreg.

580

Oh that the drinker died with his own draught!

CYCLOPS:

Papai! the vine must be a sapient plant.

ULYSSES:

If you drink much after a mighty feast,

Moistening your thirsty maw, you will sleep well;

If you leave aught, Bacchus will dry you up.

CYCLOPS:

585

Ho! ho! I can scarce rise. What pure delight!

The heavens and earth appear to whirl about

Confusedly. I see the throne of Jove

And the clear congregation of the Gods.

Now if the Graces tempted me to kiss

590

I would not — for the loveliest of them all

I would not leave this Ganymede.

SILENUS:

Polypheme,

I am the Ganymede of Jupiter.

CYCLOPS:

By Jove, you are; I bore you off from Dardanus.

. . .

[ULYSSES AND THE CHORUS.]

ULYSSES:

Come, boys of Bacchus, children of high race,

595

This man within is folded up in sleep,

And soon will vomit flesh from his fell maw;

The brand under the shed thrusts out its smoke,

No preparation needs, but to burn out

The monster’s eye; — but bear yourselves like men.

CHORUS:

600

We will have courage like the adamant rock,

All things are ready for you here; go in,

Before our father shall perceive the noise.

ULYSSES:

Vulcan, Aetnean king! burn out with fire

The shining eye of this thy neighbouring monster!

605

And thou, O Sleep, nursling of gloomy Night,

Descend unmixed on this God-hated beast,

And suffer not Ulysses and his comrades,

Returning from their famous Trojan toils,

To perish by this man, who cares not either

610

For God or mortal; or I needs must think

That Chance is a supreme divinity,

And things divine are subject to her power.

CHORUS:

Soon a crab the throat will seize

Of him who feeds upon his guest,

615

Fire will burn his lamp-like eyes

In revenge of such a feast!

A great oak stump now is lying

In the ashes yet undying.

Come, Maron, come!

620

Raging let him fix the doom,

Let him tear the eyelid up

Of the Cyclops — that his cup

May be evil!

Oh! I long to dance and revel

625

With sweet Bromian, long desired,

In loved ivy wreaths attired;

Leaving this abandoned home —

Will the moment ever come?

ULYSSES:

Be silent, ye wild things! Nay, hold your peace,

630

And keep your lips quite close; dare not to breathe,

Or spit, or e’en wink, lest ye wake the monster,

Until his eye be tortured out with fire.

CHORUS:

Nay, we are silent, and we chaw the air.

ULYSSES:

Come now, and lend a hand to the great stake

635

Within — it is delightfully red hot.

CHORUS:

You then command who first should seize the stake

To burn the Cyclops’ eye, that all may share

In the great enterprise.

SEMICHORUS 1:

We are too far;

We cannot at this distance from the door

Thrust fire into his eye.

SEMICHORUS 2:

640

And we just now

Have become lame! cannot move hand or foot.

CHORUS:

The same thing has occurred to us — our ankles

Are sprained with standing here, I know not how.

ULYSSES:

What, sprained with standing still?

CHORUS:

And there is dust

645

Or ashes in our eyes, I know not whence.

ULYSSES:

Cowardly dogs! ye will not aid me then?

CHORUS:

With pitying my own back and my back-bone,

And with not wishing all my teeth knocked out,

This cowardice comes of itself — but stay,

650

I know a famous Orphic incantation

To make the brand stick of its own accord

Into the skull of this one-eyed son of Earth.

ULYSSES:

Of old I knew ye thus by nature; now

I know ye better. — I will use the aid

655

Of my own comrades. Yet though weak of hand

Speak cheerfully, that so ye may awaken

The courage of my friends with your blithe words.

CHORUS:

This I will do with peril of my life,

And blind you with my exhortations, Cyclops.

660

Hasten and thrust,

And parch up to dust,

The eye of the beast

Who feeds on his guest.

Burn and blind

665

The Aetnean hind!

Scoop and draw,

But beware lest he claw

Your limbs near his maw.

CYCLOPS:

Ah me! my eyesight is parched up to cinders.

CHORUS:

670

What a sweet paean! sing me that again!

CYCLOPS:

Ah me! indeed, what woe has fallen upon me!

But, wretched nothings, think ye not to flee

Out of this rock; I, standing at the outlet,

Will bar the way and catch you as you pass.

CHORUS:

What are you roaring out, Cyclops?

CYCLOPS:

675

I perish!

CHORUS:

For you are wicked.

CYCLOPS:

And besides miserable.

CHORUS:

What, did you fall into the fire when drunk?

CYCLOPS:

’Twas Nobody destroyed me.

CHORUS:

Why then no one

Can be to blame.

CYCLOPS:

I say ’twas Nobody

Who blinded me.

CHORUS:

680

Why then you are not blind.

CYCLOPS:

I wish you were as blind as I am.

CHORUS:

Nay,

It cannot be that no one made you blind.

CYCLOPS:

You jeer me; where, I ask, is Nobody?

CHORUS:

Nowhere, O Cyclops.

CYCLOPS:

685

It was that stranger ruined me:— the wretch

First gave me wine and then burned out my eye,

For wine is strong and hard to struggle with.

Have they escaped, or are they yet within?

CHORUS:

They stand under the darkness of the rock

And cling to it.

CYCLOPS:

690

At my right hand or left?

CHORUS:

Close on your right.

CYCLOPS:

Where?

CHORUS:

Near the rock itself.

You have them.

CYCLOPS:

Oh, misfortune on misfortune!

I’ve cracked my skull.

CHORUS:

Now they escape you — there.

CYCLOPS:

Not there, although you say so.

CHORUS:

Not on that side.

CYCLOPS:

Where then?

CHORUS:

695

They creep about you on your left.

CYCLOPS:

Ah! I am mocked! They jeer me in my ills.

CHORUS:

Not there! he is a little there beyond you.

CYCLOPS:

Detested wretch! where are you?

ULYSSES:

Far from you

I keep with care this body of Ulysses.

CYCLOPS:

700

What do you say? You proffer a new name.

ULYSSES:

My father named me so; and I have taken

A full revenge for your unnatural feast;

I should have done ill to have burned down Troy

And not revenged the murder of my comrades.

CYCLOPS:

705

Ai! ai! the ancient oracle is accomplished;

It said that I should have my eyesight blinded

By your coming from Troy, yet it foretold

That you should pay the penalty for this

By wandering long over the homeless sea.

ULYSSES:

710

I bid thee weep — consider what I say;

I go towards the shore to drive my ship

To mine own land, o’er the Sicilian wave.

CYCLOPS:

Not so, if, whelming you with this huge stone,

I can crush you and all your men together;

715

I will descend upon the shore, though blind,

Groping my way adown the steep ravine.

CHORUS:

And we, the shipmates of Ulysses now,

Will serve our Bacchus all our happy lives.

[Published by Mrs. Shelley, “Posthumous Poems”, 1824; dated 1819. Amongst the Shelley manuscripts at the Bodleian there is a copy, ‘practically complete,’ which has been collated by Mr. C.D. Locock. See “Examination”, etc., 1903, pages 64-70. ‘Though legible throughout, and comparatively free from corrections, it has the appearance of being a first draft’ (Locock).]

_23 waste B.; wild 1824; ‘cf. 26, where waste is cancelled for wild’ (Locock).

_216 Furrow B.; Torture (evidently misread for Furrow) 1824.

_344 ravin Rossetti; spelt ravine in B., editions 1824, 1839.

_369 not to be believed B.; not believed 1824.

_382 ten cj. Swinburne; four 1824; four cancelled for ten (possibly) B.

_387 I confess I do not understand this. —[SHELLEY’S NOTE.]

_416 take]grant (as alternative) B.

_446 by some measure 1824; with some measures B.

_495 thou cj. Swinburne, Rossetti; those 1824; ‘the word is doubtful in B.’ (Locock).

_500 Thou B.; There 1824.

_508 merchant’s 1824; merchant B.

_537 Stay here now, drink B.; stay here, now drink 1824.

_606 God-hated 1824; God-hating (as an alternative) B.

_693 So B.; Now they escape you there 1824.

Epigrams.

1. — To Stella.

From the Greek of Plato.

Thou wert the morning star among the living,

Ere thy fair light had fled; —

Now, having died, thou art as Hesperus, giving

New splendour to the dead.

2. — Kissing Helena.

From the Greek of Plato.

Kissing Helena, together

With my kiss, my soul beside it

Came to my lips, and there I kept it —

For the poor thing had wandered thither,

5

To follow where the kiss should guide it,

Oh, cruel I, to intercept it!

3. — Spirit of Plato.

From the Greek.

Eagle! why soarest thou above that tomb?

To what sublime and star-ypaven home

Floatest thou? —

I am the image of swift Plato’s spirit,

5

Ascending heaven; Athens doth inherit

His corpse below.

_5 doth Boscombe manuscript; does edition 1839.

4. — Circumstance.

From the Greek.

A man who was about to hang himself,

Finding a purse, then threw away his rope;

The owner, coming to reclaim his pelf,

The halter found; and used it. So is Hope

5

Changed for Despair — one laid upon the shelf,

We take the other. Under Heaven’s high cope

Fortune is God — all you endure and do

Depends on circumstance as much as you.

[These four Epigrams were published — numbers 2 and 4 without title — by Mrs. Shelley, “Poetical Works”, 1839, 1st edition.]

Fragment of the Elegy on the Death of Adonis.

Prom the Greek of Bion.

I mourn Adonis dead — loveliest Adonis —

Dead, dead Adonis — and the Loves lament.

Sleep no more, Venus, wrapped in purple woof —

Wake violet-stoled queen, and weave the crown

5

Of Death — ’tis Misery calls — for he is dead.

The lovely one lies wounded in the mountains,

His white thigh struck with the white tooth; he scarce

Yet breathes; and Venus hangs in agony there.

The dark blood wanders o’er his snowy limbs,

10

His eyes beneath their lids are lustreless,

The rose has fled from his wan lips, and there

That kiss is dead, which Venus gathers yet.

A deep, deep wound Adonis . . .

A deeper Venus bears upon her heart.

15

See, his beloved dogs are gathering round —

The Oread nymphs are weeping — Aphrodite

With hair unbound is wandering through the woods,

‘Wildered, ungirt, unsandalled — the thorns pierce

Her hastening feet and drink her sacred blood.

20

Bitterly screaming out, she is driven on

Through the long vales; and her Assyrian boy,

Her love, her husband, calls — the purple blood

From his struck thigh stains her white navel now,

Her bosom, and her neck before like snow.

25

Alas for Cytherea — the Loves mourn —

The lovely, the beloved is gone! — and now

Her sacred beauty vanishes away.

For Venus whilst Adonis lived was fair —

Alas! her loveliness is dead with him.

30

The oaks and mountains cry, Ai! ai! Adonis!

The springs their waters change to tears and weep —

The flowers are withered up with grief . . .

Ai! ai! . . . Adonis is dead

Echo resounds . . . Adonis dead.

35

Who will weep not thy dreadful woe. O Venus?

Soon as she saw and knew the mortal wound

Of her Adonis — saw the life-blood flow

From his fair thigh, now wasting — wailing loud

She clasped him, and cried . . . ‘Stay, Adonis!

40

Stay, dearest one, . . .

and mix my lips with thine —

Wake yet a while, Adonis — oh, but once,

That I may kiss thee now for the last time —

But for as long as one short kiss may live —

45

Oh, let thy breath flow from thy dying soul

Even to my mouth and heart, that I may suck

That . . . ’

[Published by Forman, “Poetical Works of P. B. S.”, 1876.]

_23 his Rossetti, Dowden, Woodberry; her Boscombe manuscript, Forman.

Fragment of the Elegy on the Death of Bion.

From the Greek of Moschus.

Ye Dorian woods and waves, lament aloud —

Augment your tide, O streams, with fruitless tears,

For the beloved Bion is no more.

Let every tender herb and plant and flower,

5

From each dejected bud and drooping bloom,

Shed dews of liquid sorrow, and with breath

Of melancholy sweetness on the wind

Diffuse its languid love; let roses blush,

Anemones grow paler for the loss

10

Their dells have known; and thou, O hyacinth,

Utter thy legend now — yet more, dumb flower,

Than ‘Ah! alas!’— thine is no common grief —

Bion the [sweetest singer] is no more.

[Published from the Hunt manuscripts by Forman, “Poetical Works of P. B. S.”, 1876.]

_2 tears]sorrow (as alternative) Hunt manuscript.

From the Greek of Moschus.

Tan ala tan glaukan otan onemos atrema Balle — k.t.l.

When winds that move not its calm surface sweep

The azure sea, I love the land no more;

The smiles of the serene and tranquil deep

Tempt my unquiet mind. — But when the roar

5

Of Ocean’s gray abyss resounds, and foam

Gathers upon the sea, and vast waves burst,

I turn from the drear aspect to the home

Of Earth and its deep woods, where, interspersed,

When winds blow loud, pines make sweet melody.

10

Whose house is some lone bark, whose toil the sea,

Whose prey the wandering fish, an evil lot

Has chosen. — But I my languid limbs will fling

Beneath the plane, where the brook’s murmuring

Moves the calm spirit, but disturbs it not.

[Published with “Alastor”, 1816.]

Pan, Echo, and the Satyr.

From the Greek of Moschus.

Pan loved his neighbour Echo — but that child

Of Earth and Air pined for the Satyr leaping;

The Satyr loved with wasting madness wild

The bright nymph Lyda — and so three went weeping.

5

As Pan loved Echo, Echo loved the Satyr,

The Satyr, Lyda; and so love consumed them. —

And thus to each — which was a woful matter —

To bear what they inflicted Justice doomed them;

For, inasmuch as each might hate the lover,

10

Each, loving, so was hated. — Ye that love not

Be warned — in thought turn this example over,

That when ye love, the like return ye prove not.

[Published (without title) by Mrs. Shelley, “Posthumous Poems”, 1824. There is a draft amongst the Hunt manuscripts.]

_6 so Hunt manuscript; thus 1824.

_11 So 1824; This lesson timely in your thoughts turn over, The moral of this song in thought turn over (as alternatives) Hunt manuscript.

From Vergil’s Tenth Eclogue.

Melodious Arethusa, o’er my verse

Shed thou once more the spirit of thy stream:

Who denies verse to Gallus? So, when thou

Glidest beneath the green and purple gleam

5

Of Syracusan waters, mayst thou flow

Unmingled with the bitter Doric dew!

Begin, and, whilst the goats are browsing now

The soft leaves, in our way let us pursue

The melancholy loves of Gallus. List!

10

We sing not to the dead: the wild woods knew

His sufferings, and their echoes . . .

Young Naiads, . . . in what far woodlands wild

Wandered ye when unworthy love possessed

Your Gallus? Not where Pindus is up-piled,

15

Nor where Parnassus’ sacred mount, nor where

Aonian Aganippe expands . . .

The laurels and the myrtle-copses dim.

The pine-encircled mountain, Maenalus,

The cold crags of Lycaeus, weep for him;

20

And Sylvan, crowned with rustic coronals,

Came shaking in his speed the budding wands

And heavy lilies which he bore: we knew

Pan the Arcadian.

. . .

‘What madness is this, Gallus? Thy heart’s care

25

With willing steps pursues another there.’

[VERSES 1-26.]

[Published by Rossetti, “Complete Poetical Works of P. B. S.”, 1870, from the Boscombe manuscripts now in the Bodleian. Mr. Locock (“Examination”, etc., 1903, pages 47-50), as the result of his collation of the same manuscripts, gives a revised and expanded version which we print below.]

The Same.

(As revised by Mr. C.D. Locock.)

Melodious Arethusa, o’er my verse

Shed thou once more the spirit of thy stream:

(Two lines missing.)

Who denies verse to Gallus? So, when thou

Glidest beneath the green and purple gleam

5

Of Syracusan waters, mayest thou flow

Unmingled with the bitter Dorian dew!

Begin, and whilst the goats are browsing now

The soft leaves, in our song let us pursue

The melancholy loves of Gallus. List!

10

We sing not to the deaf: the wild woods knew

His sufferings, and their echoes answer . . .

Young Naiades, in what far woodlands wild

Wandered ye, when unworthy love possessed

Our Gallus? Nor where Pindus is up-piled,

15

Nor where Parnassus’ sacred mount, nor where

Aonian Aganippe spreads its . . .

(Three lines missing.)

The laurels and the myrtle-copses dim,

The pine-encircled mountain, Maenalus,

The cold crags of Lycaeus weep for him.

(Several lines missing.)

20

‘What madness is this, Gallus? thy heart’s care,

Lycoris, mid rude camps and Alpine snow,

With willing step pursues another there.’

(Some lines missing.)

And Sylvan, crowned with rustic coronals,

Came shaking in his speed the budding wands

25

And heavy lilies which he bore: we knew

Pan the Arcadian with. . . .

. . . and said,

‘Wilt thou not ever cease? Love cares not.

The meadows with fresh streams, the bees with thyme,

30

The goats with the green leaves of budding spring

Are saturated not — nor Love with tears.’

From Vergil’s Fourth Georgic.

And the cloven waters like a chasm of mountains

Stood, and received him in its mighty portal

And led him through the deep’s untrampled fountains

He went in wonder through the path immortal

5

Of his great Mother and her humid reign

And groves profaned not by the step of mortal

Which sounded as he passed, and lakes which rain

Replenished not girt round by marble caves

‘Wildered by the watery motion of the main

10

Half ‘wildered he beheld the bursting waves

Of every stream beneath the mighty earth

Phasis and Lycus which the . . . sand paves,

[And] The chasm where old Enipeus has its birth

And father Tyber and Anienas[?] glow

15

And whence Caicus, Mysian stream, comes forth

And rock-resounding Hypanis, and thou

Eridanus who bearest like empire’s sign

Two golden horns upon thy taurine brow

Thou than whom none of the streams divine

20

Through garden-fields and meads with fiercer power,

Burst in their tumult on the purple brine

[VERSES 360 ET SEQ.]

[Published by Locock, “Examination”, etc., 1903.]

Sonnet.

From the Italian of Dante.

DANTE ALIGHIERI TO GUIDO CAVALCANTI:

Guido, I would that Lapo, thou, and I,

Led by some strong enchantment, might ascend

A magic ship, whose charmed sails should fly

With winds at will where’er our thoughts might wend,

5

So that no change, nor any evil chance

Should mar our joyous voyage; but it might be,

That even satiety should still enhance

Between our hearts their strict community:

And that the bounteous wizard then would place

10

Vanna and Bice and my gentle love,

Companions of our wandering, and would grace

With passionate talk, wherever we might rove,

Our time, and each were as content and free

As I believe that thou and I should be.

[Published with “Alastor”, 1816; reprinted, “Posthumous Poems”, 1824.]

_5 So 1824; And 1816.

The First Canzone of the Convito.

From the Italian of Dante.

1.

Ye who intelligent the Third Heaven move,

Hear the discourse which is within my heart,

Which cannot be declared, it seems so new.

The Heaven whose course follows your power and art,

5

Oh, gentle creatures that ye are! me drew,

And therefore may I dare to speak to you,

Even of the life which now I live — and yet

I pray that ye will hear me when I cry,

And tell of mine own heart this novelty;

10

How the lamenting Spirit moans in it,

And how a voice there murmurs against her

Who came on the refulgence of your sphere.

2.

A sweet Thought, which was once the life within

This heavy heart, man a time and oft

15

Went up before our Father’s feet, and there

It saw a glorious Lady throned aloft;

And its sweet talk of her my soul did win,

So that I said, ‘Thither I too will fare.’

That Thought is fled, and one doth now appear

20

Which tyrannizes me with such fierce stress,

That my heart trembles — ye may see it leap —

And on another Lady bids me keep

Mine eyes, and says — Who would have blessedness

Let him but look upon that Lady’s eyes,

25

Let him not fear the agony of sighs.

3.

This lowly Thought, which once would talk with me

Of a bright seraph sitting crowned on high,

Found such a cruel foe it died, and so

My Spirit wept, the grief is hot even now —

30

And said, Alas for me! how swift could flee

That piteous Thought which did my life console!

And the afflicted one . . . questioning

Mine eyes, if such a Lady saw they never,

And why they would . . .

35

I said: ‘Beneath those eyes might stand for ever

He whom . . . regards must kill with . . .

To have known their power stood me in little stead,

Those eyes have looked on me, and I am dead.’

4.

‘Thou art not dead, but thou hast wandered,

40

Thou Soul of ours, who thyself dost fret,’

A Spirit of gentle Love beside me said;

For that fair Lady, whom thou dost regret,

Hath so transformed the life which thou hast led,

Thou scornest it, so worthless art thou made.

45

And see how meek, how pitiful, how staid,

Yet courteous, in her majesty she is.

And still call thou her Woman in thy thought;

Her whom, if thou thyself deceivest not,

Thou wilt behold decked with such loveliness,

50

That thou wilt cry [Love] only Lord, lo! here

Thy handmaiden, do what thou wilt with her.

5.

My song, I fear that thou wilt find but few

Who fitly shall conceive thy reasoning

Of such hard matter dost thou entertain.

55

Whence, if by misadventure chance should bring

Thee to base company, as chance may do,

Quite unaware of what thou dost contain,

I prithee comfort thy sweet self again,

My last delight; tell them that they are dull,

60

And bid them own that thou art beautiful.

[Published by Garnett, “Relics of Shelley”, 1862; dated 1820.]

NOTE: C5. Published with “Epispychidion”, 1821. — ED.

Matilda Gathering Flowers.

From the Purgatorio of Dante, Canto 28, Lines 1-51.

And earnest to explore within — around —

The divine wood, whose thick green living woof

Tempered the young day to the sight — I wound

Up the green slope, beneath the forest’s roof,

5

With slow, soft steps leaving the mountain’s steep,

And sought those inmost labyrinths, motion-proof

Against the air, that in that stillness deep

And solemn, struck upon my forehead bare,

The slow, soft stroke of a continuous . . .

10

In which the . . . leaves tremblingly were

All bent towards that part where earliest

The sacred hill obscures the morning air.

Yet were they not so shaken from the rest,

But that the birds, perched on the utmost spray,

15

Incessantly renewing their blithe quest,

With perfect joy received the early day,

Singing within the glancing leaves, whose sound

Kept a low burden to their roundelay,

Such as from bough to bough gathers around

20

The pine forest on bleak Chiassi’s shore,

When Aeolus Sirocco has unbound.

My slow steps had already borne me o’er

Such space within the antique wood, that I

Perceived not where I entered any more —

25

When, lo! a stream whose little waves went by,

Bending towards the left through grass that grew

Upon its bank, impeded suddenly

My going on. Water of purest hue

On earth, would appear turbid and impure

30

Compared with this, whose unconcealing dew,

Dark, dark, yet clear, moved under the obscure

Eternal shades, whose interwoven looms

The rays of moon or sunlight ne’er endure.

I moved not with my feet, but mid the glooms

35

Pierced with my charmed eye, contemplating

The mighty multitude of fresh May blooms

Which starred that night, when, even as a thing

That suddenly, for blank astonishment,

Charms every sense, and makes all thought take wing —

40

A solitary woman! and she went

Singing and gathering flower after flower,

With which her way was painted and besprent.

‘Bright lady, who, if looks had ever power

To bear true witness of the heart within,

45

Dost bask under the beams of love, come lower

Towards this bank. I prithee let me win

This much of thee, to come, that I may hear

Thy song: like Proserpine, in Enna’s glen,

Thou seemest to my fancy, singing here

50

And gathering flowers, as that fair maiden when

She lost the Spring, and Ceres her, more dear.

Up a green slope, beneath the starry roof,

With slow, slow steps — 1834.

Like the sweet breathing of a child asleep:

Already I had lost myself so far

Amid that tangled wilderness that I

Perceived not where I ventured, but no fear

Of wandering from my way disturbed, when nigh

A little stream appeared; the grass that grew

Thick on its banks impeded suddenly

My going on. 1834.

My feet were motionless, but mid the glooms

Darted my charmed eyes — 1834.

[Published in part (lines 1-8, 22-51) by Medwin, “The Angler in Wales”, 1834, “Life of Shelley”, 1847; reprinted in full by Garnett, “Relics of Shelley”, 1862.]

_2 The 1862; That 1834.

_4, _5 So 1862;

_6 inmost 1862; leafy 1834.

_9 So 1862; The slow, soft stroke of a continuous sleep cj. Rossetti, 1870.

_9-_28 So 1862;

_13 the 1862; their cj. Rossetti, 1870.

_26 through]the cj. Rossetti.

_28 hue 1862; dew 1834.

_30 dew 1862; hue 1834.

_32 Eternal shades 1862; Of the close boughs 1834.

_33 So 1862; No ray of moon or sunshine would endure 1834.

_34, _35 So 1862;

_37 Which 1834; That 1862.

_39 So 1834; Dissolves all other thought . . . 1862.

_40 So 1862; Appeared a solitary maid — she went 1834.

_46 Towards 1862; Unto 1834.

_47 thee, to come 1862; thee O come 1834.

Fragment.

Adapted From the Vita Nuova of Dante.

What Mary is when she a little smiles

I cannot even tell or call to mind,

It is a miracle so new, so rare.

[Published by Forman, “Poetical Works of P. B. S.”, 1876.]

Ugolino.

(Published by Medwin, “Life of Shelley”, 1847, with Shelley’s corrections in italics [’’]. — ED.)

Inferno 33, 22-75.

Now had the loophole of that dungeon, still

Which bears the name of Famine’s Tower from me,

And where ’tis fit that many another will

Be doomed to linger in captivity,

5

Shown through its narrow opening in my cell

‘Moon after moon slow waning’, when a sleep,

‘That of the future burst the veil, in dream

Visited me. It was a slumber deep

And evil; for I saw, or I did seem’

10

To see, ‘that’ tyrant Lord his revels keep

The leader of the cruel hunt to them,

Chasing the wolf and wolf-cubs up the steep

Ascent, that from ‘the Pisan is the screen’

Of ‘Lucca’; with him Gualandi came,

15

Sismondi, and Lanfranchi, ‘bloodhounds lean,

Trained to the sport and eager for the game

Wide ranging in his front;’ but soon were seen

Though by so short a course, with ‘spirits tame,’

The father and ‘his whelps’ to flag at once,

20

And then the sharp fangs gored their bosoms deep.

Ere morn I roused myself, and heard my sons,

For they were with me, moaning in their sleep,

And begging bread. Ah, for those darling ones!

Right cruel art thou, if thou dost not weep

25

In thinking of my soul’s sad augury;

And if thou weepest not now, weep never more!

They were already waked, as wont drew nigh

The allotted hour for food, and in that hour

Each drew a presage from his dream. When I

30

‘Heard locked beneath me of that horrible tower

The outlet; then into their eyes alone

I looked to read myself,’ without a sign

Or word. I wept not — turned within to stone.

They wept aloud, and little Anselm mine,

35

Said —’twas my youngest, dearest little one —

“What ails thee, father? Why look so at thine?”

In all that day, and all the following night,

I wept not, nor replied; but when to shine

Upon the world, not us, came forth the light

40

Of the new sun, and thwart my prison thrown

Gleamed through its narrow chink, a doleful sight,

‘Three faces, each the reflex of my own,

Were imaged by its faint and ghastly ray;’

Then I, of either hand unto the bone,

45

Gnawed, in my agony; and thinking they

Twas done from sudden pangs, in their excess,

All of a sudden raise themselves, and say,

“Father! our woes, so great, were yet the less

Would you but eat of us — twas ‘you who clad

50

Our bodies in these weeds of wretchedness;

Despoil them’.” Not to make their hearts more sad,

I ‘hushed’ myself. That day is at its close —

Another — still we were all mute. Oh, had

The obdurate earth opened to end our woes!

55

The fourth day dawned, and when the new sun shone,

Outstretched himself before me as it rose

My Gaddo, saying, “Help, father! hast thou none

For thine own child — is there no help from thee?”

He died — there at my feet — and one by one,

60

I saw them fall, plainly as you see me.

Between the fifth and sixth day, ere twas dawn,

I found ‘myself blind-groping o’er the three.’

Three days I called them after they were gone.

Famine of grief can get the mastery.

[Translated by Medwin and corrected by Shelley.]

Sonnet.

From the Italian of Cavalcanti.

GUIDO CAVALCANTI TO DANTE ALIGHIERI:

Returning from its daily quest, my Spirit

Changed thoughts and vile in thee doth weep to find:

It grieves me that thy mild and gentle mind

Those ample virtues which it did inherit

5

Has lost. Once thou didst loathe the multitude

Of blind and madding men — I then loved thee —

I loved thy lofty songs and that sweet mood

When thou wert faithful to thyself and me

I dare not now through thy degraded state

10

Own the delight thy strains inspire — in vain

I seek what once thou wert — we cannot meet

And we were wont. Again and yet again

Ponder my words: so the false Spirit shall fly

And leave to thee thy true integrity.

[Published by Forman (who assigns it to 1815), “Poetical Works of P. B. S.”, 1876.]

Scenes From the Magico Prodigioso.

From the Spanish of Calderon.

SCENE 1: ENTER CYPRIAN, DRESSED AS A STUDENT; CLARIN AND MOSCON AS POOR SCHOLARS, WITH BOOKS.

CYPRIAN:

In the sweet solitude of this calm place,

This intricate wild wilderness of trees

And flowers and undergrowth of odorous plants,

Leave me; the books you brought out of the house

5

To me are ever best society.

And while with glorious festival and song,

Antioch now celebrates the consecration

Of a proud temple to great Jupiter,

And bears his image in loud jubilee

10

To its new shrine, I would consume what still

Lives of the dying day in studious thought,

Far from the throng and turmoil. You, my friends,

Go, and enjoy the festival; it will

Be worth your pains. You may return for me

15

When the sun seeks its grave among the billows

Which, among dim gray clouds on the horizon,

Dance like white plumes upon a hearse; — and here

I shall expect you.

Hid among dim gray clouds on the horizon

Which dance like plumes — transcr., Forman.

MOSCON:

I cannot bring my mind,

Great as my haste to see the festival

20

Certainly is, to leave you, Sir, without

Just saying some three or four thousand words.

How is it possible that on a day

Of such festivity, you can be content

To come forth to a solitary country

25

With three or four old books, and turn your back

On all this mirth?

CLARIN:

My master’s in the right;

There is not anything more tiresome

Than a procession day, with troops, and priests,

And dances, and all that.

MOSCON:

From first to last,

30

Clarin, you are a temporizing flatterer;

You praise not what you feel but what he does; —

Toadeater!

CLARIN:

You lie — under a mistake —

For this is the most civil sort of lie

That can be given to a man’s face. I now

Say what I think.

CYPRIAN:

35

Enough, you foolish fellows!

Puffed up with your own doting ignorance,

You always take the two sides of one question.

Now go; and as I said, return for me

When night falls, veiling in its shadows wide

40

This glorious fabric of the universe.

MOSCON:

How happens it, although you can maintain

The folly of enjoying festivals,

That yet you go there?

CLARIN:

Nay, the consequence

Is clear:— who ever did what he advises

Others to do? —

MOSCON:

45

Would that my feet were wings,

So would I fly to Livia.

[EXIT.]

CLARIN:

To speak truth,

Livia is she who has surprised my heart;

But he is more than half-way there. — Soho!

Livia, I come; good sport, Livia, soho!

[EXIT.]

CYPRIAN:

50

Now, since I am alone, let me examine

The question which has long disturbed my mind

With doubt, since first I read in Plinius

The words of mystic import and deep sense

In which he defines God. My intellect

55

Can find no God with whom these marks and signs

Fitly agree. It is a hidden truth

Which I must fathom.

[CYPRIAN READS; THE DAEMON, DRESSED IN A COURT DRESS, ENTERS.]

gentleman 1824.

DAEMON:

Search even as thou wilt,

But thou shalt never find what I can hide.

CYPRIAN:

What noise is that among the boughs? Who moves?

What art thou? —

DAEMON:

60

’Tis a foreign gentleman.

Even from this morning I have lost my way

In this wild place; and my poor horse at last,

Quite overcome, has stretched himself upon

The enamelled tapestry of this mossy mountain,

65

And feeds and rests at the same time. I was

Upon my way to Antioch upon business

Of some importance, but wrapped up in cares

(Who is exempt from this inheritance?)

I parted from my company, and lost

70

My way, and lost my servants and my comrades.

CYPRIAN:

’Tis singular that even within the sight

Of the high towers of Antioch you could lose

Your way. Of all the avenues and green paths

Of this wild wood there is not one but leads,

75

As to its centre, to the walls of Antioch;

Take which you will, you cannot miss your road.

DAEMON:

And such is ignorance! Even in the sight

Of knowledge, it can draw no profit from it.

But as it still is early, and as I

80

Have no acquaintances in Antioch,

Being a stranger there, I will even wait

The few surviving hours of the day,

Until the night shall conquer it. I see

Both by your dress and by the books in which

85

You find delight and company, that you

Are a great student; — for my part, I feel

Much sympathy in such pursuits.

CYPRIAN:

Have you

Studied much?

DAEMON:

No — and yet I know enough

Not to be wholly ignorant.

CYPRIAN:

Pray, Sir,

What science may you know? —

DAEMON:

Many.

CYPRIAN:

90

Alas!

Much pains must we expend on one alone,

And even then attain it not; — but you

Have the presumption to assert that you

Know many without study.

DAEMON:

And with truth.

95

For in the country whence I come the sciences

Require no learning — they are known.

CYPRIAN:

Oh, would

I were of that bright country! for in this

The more we study, we the more discover

Our ignorance.

DAEMON:

It is so true, that I

100

Had so much arrogance as to oppose

The chair of the most high Professorship,

And obtained many votes, and, though I lost,

The attempt was still more glorious, than the failure

Could be dishonourable. If you believe not,

105

Let us refer it to dispute respecting

That which you know the best, and although I

Know not the opinion you maintain, and though

It be the true one, I will take the contrary.

CYPRIAN:

The offer gives me pleasure. I am now

110

Debating with myself upon a passage

Of Plinius, and my mind is racked with doubt

To understand and know who is the God

Of whom he speaks.

DAEMON:

It is a passage, if

I recollect it right, couched in these words

115

‘God is one supreme goodness, one pure essence,

One substance, and one sense, all sight, all hands.’

CYPRIAN:

’Tis true.

DAEMON:

What difficulty find you here?

CYPRIAN:

I do not recognize among the Gods

The God defined by Plinius; if he must

120

Be supreme goodness, even Jupiter

Is not supremely good; because we see

His deeds are evil, and his attributes

Tainted with mortal weakness; in what manner

Can supreme goodness be consistent with

The passions of humanity?

DAEMON:

125

The wisdom

Of the old world masked with the names of Gods

The attributes of Nature and of Man;

A sort of popular philosophy.

CYPRIAN:

This reply will not satisfy me, for

130

Such awe is due to the high name of God

That ill should never be imputed. Then,

Examining the question with more care,

It follows, that the Gods would always will

That which is best, were they supremely good.

135

How then does one will one thing, one another?

And that you may not say that I allege

Poetical or philosophic learning:—

Consider the ambiguous responses

Of their oracular statues; from two shrines

140

Two armies shall obtain the assurance of

One victory. Is it not indisputable

That two contending wills can never lead

To the same end? And, being opposite,

If one be good, is not the other evil?

145

Evil in God is inconceivable;

But supreme goodness fails among the Gods

Without their union.

DAEMON:

I deny your major.

These responses are means towards some end

Unfathomed by our intellectual beam.

150

They are the work of Providence, and more

The battle’s loss may profit those who lose,

Than victory advantage those who win.

CYPRIAN:

That I admit; and yet that God should not

(Falsehood is incompatible with deity)

155

Assure the victory; it would be enough

To have permitted the defeat. If God

Be all sight — God, who had beheld the truth,

Would not have given assurance of an end

Never to be accomplished: thus, although

160

The Deity may according to his attributes

Be well distinguished into persons, yet

Even in the minutest circumstance

His essence must be one.

DAEMON:

To attain the end

The affections of the actors in the scene

165

Must have been thus influenced by his voice.

CYPRIAN:

But for a purpose thus subordinate

He might have employed Genii, good or evil —

A sort of spirits called so by the learned,

Who roam about inspiring good or evil,

170

And from whose influence and existence we

May well infer our immortality.

Thus God might easily, without descent

To a gross falsehood in his proper person,

Have moved the affections by this mediation

To the just point.

DAEMON:

175

These trifling contradictions

Do not suffice to impugn the unity

Of the high Gods; in things of great importance

They still appear unanimous; consider

That glorious fabric, man — his workmanship

Is stamped with one conception.

CYPRIAN:

180

Who made man

Must have, methinks, the advantage of the others.

If they are equal, might they not have risen

In opposition to the work, and being

All hands, according to our author here,

185

Have still destroyed even as the other made?

If equal in their power, unequal only

In opportunity, which of the two

Will remain conqueror?

DAEMON:

On impossible

And false hypothesis there can be built

190

No argument. Say, what do you infer

From this?

CYPRIAN:

That there must be a mighty God

Of supreme goodness and of highest grace,

All sight, all hands, all truth, infallible,

Without an equal and without a rival,

195

The cause of all things and the effect of nothing,

One power, one will, one substance, and one essence.

And, in whatever persons, one or two,

His attributes may be distinguished, one

Sovereign power, one solitary essence,

One cause of all cause.

[THEY RISE.]

DAEMON:

200

How can I impugn

So clear a consequence?

CYPRIAN:

Do you regret

My victory?

DAEMON:

Who but regrets a check

In rivalry of wit? I could reply

And urge new difficulties, but will now

205

Depart, for I hear steps of men approaching,

And it is time that I should now pursue

My journey to the city.

CYPRIAN:

Go in peace!

DAEMON:

Remain in peace! — Since thus it profits him

To study, I will wrap his senses up

210

In sweet oblivion of all thought but of

A piece of excellent beauty; and, as I

Have power given me to wage enmity

Against Justina’s soul, I will extract

From one effect two vengeances.

[ASIDE AND EXIT.]

CYPRIAN:

I never

215

Met a more learned person. Let me now

Revolve this doubt again with careful mind.

[HE READS.]

[FLORO AND LELIO ENTER.]

LELIO:

Here stop. These toppling rocks and tangled boughs,

Impenetrable by the noonday beam,

Shall be sole witnesses of what we —

FLORO:

Draw!

220

If there were words, here is the place for deeds.

LELIO:

Thou needest not instruct me; well I know

That in the field, the silent tongue of steel

Speaks thus —

[THEY FIGHT.]

CYPRIAN:

Ha! what is this? Lelio — Floro,

Be it enough that Cyprian stands between you,

Although unarmed.

LELIO:

225

Whence comest thou, to stand

Between me and my vengeance?

FLORO:

From what rocks

And desert cells?

[ENTER MOSCON AND CLARIN.]

MOSCON:

Run! run! for where we left

My master. I now hear the clash of swords.

CLARIN:

I never run to approach things of this sort

230

But only to avoid them. Sir! Cyprian! sir!

CYPRIAN:

Be silent, fellows! What! two friends who are

In blood and fame the eyes and hope of Antioch,

One of the noble race of the Colalti,

The other son o’ the Governor, adventure

235

And cast away, on some slight cause no doubt,

Two lives, the honour of their country?

LELIO:

Cyprian!

Although my high respect towards your person

Holds now my sword suspended, thou canst not

Restore it to the slumber of the scabbard:

240

Thou knowest more of science than the duel;

For when two men of honour take the field,

No counsel nor respect can make them friends

But one must die in the dispute.

No [ . . . ] or 1824; No reasoning or transcr.

FLORO:

I pray

That you depart hence with your people, and

245

Leave us to finish what we have begun

Without advantage. —

CYPRIAN:

Though you may imagine

That I know little of the laws of duel,

Which vanity and valour instituted,

You are in error. By my birth I am

250

Held no less than yourselves to know the limits

Of honour and of infamy, nor has study

Quenched the free spirit which first ordered them;

And thus to me, as one well experienced

In the false quicksands of the sea of honour,

255

You may refer the merits of the case;

And if I should perceive in your relation

That either has the right to satisfaction

From the other, I give you my word of honour

To leave you.

LELIO:

Under this condition then

260

I will relate the cause, and you will cede

And must confess the impossibility

Of compromise; for the same lady is

Beloved by Floro and myself.

FLORO:

It seems

Much to me that the light of day should look

265

Upon that idol of my heart — but he —

Leave us to fight, according to thy word.

CYPRIAN:

Permit one question further: is the lady

Impossible to hope or not?

LELIO:

She is

So excellent, that if the light of day

270

Should excite Floro’s jealousy, it were

Without just cause, for even the light of day

Trembles to gaze on her.

CYPRIAN:

Would you for your

Part, marry her?

FLORO:

Such is my confidence.

CYPRIAN:

And you?

LELIO:

Oh! would that I could lift my hope

275

So high, for though she is extremely poor,

Her virtue is her dowry.

CYPRIAN:

And if you both

Would marry her, is it not weak and vain,

Culpable and unworthy, thus beforehand

To slur her honour? What would the world say

280

If one should slay the other, and if she

Should afterwards espouse the murderer?

[THE RIVALS AGREE TO REFER THEIR QUARREL TO CYPRIAN; WHO IN CONSEQUENCE VISITS JUSTINA, AND BECOMES ENAMOURED OF HER; SHE DISDAINS HIM, AND HE RETIRES TO A SOLITARY SEA-SHORE.]

[Published by Mrs. Shelley, “Posthumous Poems”, 1824; dated March, 1822. There is a transcript of Scene 1 among the Hunt manuscripts, which has been collated by Mr. Buxton Forman.]

_14 So transcr.; Be worth the labour, and return for me 1824.

_16, _17 So 1824;

_21 thousand transcr.; hundred 1824.

_23 be content transcr.; bring your mind 1824.

_28 and priests transcr.; of men 1824.

_36 doting ignorance transcr.; ignorance and pride 1824.

_57 Stage Direction: So transcr. Reads. Enter the Devil as a fine

_87 in transcr.; with 1824.

_95 come the sciences]come sciences 1824.

_106 the transcr.; wanting, 1824.

_133 would transcr.; should 1824.

_157 had transcr.; wanting, 1824.

_172 descent transcr.; descending 1824.

_186 unequal only transcr.; and only unequal 1824.

_197 And]query, Ay?

_200 all cause 1824; all things transcr.

_214 Stage direction So transcr.; Exit 1824.

_228 I now hear transcr.; we hear 1824.

_227-_229 lines of otherwise arranged, 1824.

_233 race transcr.; men 1824. Colalti]Colatti 1824.

_239 of the transcr.; of its 1824.

_242 No counsel nor 1839, 1st edition;

_243 dispute transcr. pursuit 1824.

_253 well omit, cj. Forman.

SCENE 2.

CYPRIAN:

O memory! permit it not

That the tyrant of my thought

Be another soul that still

Holds dominion o’er the will,

5

That would refuse, but can no more,

To bend, to tremble, and adore.

Vain idolatry! — I saw,

And gazing, became blind with error;

Weak ambition, which the awe

10

Of her presence bound to terror!

So beautiful she was — and I,

Between my love and jealousy,

Am so convulsed with hope and fear,

Unworthy as it may appear; —

15

So bitter is the life I live,

That, hear me, Hell! I now would give

To thy most detested spirit

My soul, for ever to inherit,

To suffer punishment and pine,

20

So this woman may be mine.

Hear’st thou, Hell! dost thou reject it?

My soul is offered!

DAEMON (UNSEEN):

I accept it.

[TEMPEST, WITH THUNDER AND LIGHTNING.]

CYPRIAN:

What is this? ye heavens for ever pure,

At once intensely radiant and obscure!

25

Athwart the aethereal halls

The lightning’s arrow and the thunder-balls

The day affright,

As from the horizon round,

Burst with earthquake sound,

30

In mighty torrents the electric fountains; —

Clouds quench the sun, and thunder-smoke

Strangles the air, and fire eclipses Heaven.

Philosophy, thou canst not even

Compel their causes underneath thy yoke:

35

From yonder clouds even to the waves below

The fragments of a single ruin choke

Imagination’s flight;

For, on flakes of surge, like feathers light,

The ashes of the desolation, cast

40

Upon the gloomy blast,

Tell of the footsteps of the storm;

And nearer, see, the melancholy form

Of a great ship, the outcast of the sea,

Drives miserably!

45

And it must fly the pity of the port,

Or perish, and its last and sole resort

Is its own raging enemy.

The terror of the thrilling cry

Was a fatal prophecy

50

Of coming death, who hovers now

Upon that shattered prow,

That they who die not may be dying still.

And not alone the insane elements

Are populous with wild portents,

55

But that sad ship is as a miracle

Of sudden ruin, for it drives so fast

It seems as if it had arrayed its form

With the headlong storm.

It strikes — I almost feel the shock —

60

It stumbles on a jagged rock —

Sparkles of blood on the white foam are cast.

[A TEMPEST.]

ALL EXCLAIM [WITHIN]:

We are all lost!

DAEMON [WITHIN]:

Now from this plank will I

Pass to the land and thus fulfil my scheme.

CYPRIAN:

As in contempt of the elemental rage

65

A man comes forth in safety, while the ship’s

Great form is in a watery eclipse

Obliterated from the Oceans page,

And round its wreck the huge sea-monsters sit,

A horrid conclave, and the whistling wave

70

Is heaped over its carcase, like a grave.

[THE DAEMON ENTERS, AS ESCAPED FROM THE SEA.]

DAEMON [ASIDE]:

It was essential to my purposes

To wake a tumult on the sapphire ocean,

That in this unknown form I might at length

Wipe out the blot of the discomfiture

75

Sustained upon the mountain, and assail

With a new war the soul of Cyprian,

Forging the instruments of his destruction

Even from his love and from his wisdom. — O

Beloved earth, dear mother, in thy bosom

80

I seek a refuge from the monster who

Precipitates itself upon me.

CYPRIAN:

Friend,

Collect thyself; and be the memory

Of thy late suffering, and thy greatest sorrow

But as a shadow of the past — for nothing

85

Beneath the circle of the moon, but flows

And changes, and can never know repose.

DAEMON:

And who art thou, before whose feet my fate

Has prostrated me?

CYPRIAN:

One who, moved with pity,

Would soothe its stings.

DAEMON:

Oh, that can never be!

90

No solace can my lasting sorrows find.

CYPRIAN:

Wherefore?

DAEMON:

Because my happiness is lost.

Yet I lament what has long ceased to be

The object of desire or memory,

And my life is not life.

CYPRIAN:

Now, since the fury

95

Of this earthquaking hurricane is still,

And the crystalline Heaven has reassumed

Its windless calm so quickly, that it seems

As if its heavy wrath had been awakened

Only to overwhelm that vessel — speak,

Who art thou, and whence comest thou?

DAEMON:

100

Far more

My coming hither cost, than thou hast seen

Or I can tell. Among my misadventures

This shipwreck is the least. Wilt thou hear?

CYPRIAN:

Speak.

DAEMON:

Since thou desirest, I will then unveil

105

Myself to thee; — for in myself I am

A world of happiness and misery;

This I have lost, and that I must lament

Forever. In my attributes I stood

So high and so heroically great,

110

In lineage so supreme, and with a genius

Which penetrated with a glance the world

Beneath my feet, that, won by my high merit,

A king — whom I may call the King of kings,

Because all others tremble in their pride

115

Before the terrors of His countenance,

In His high palace roofed with brightest gems

Of living light — call them the stars of Heaven —

Named me His counsellor. But the high praise

Stung me with pride and envy, and I rose

120

In mighty competition, to ascend

His seat and place my foot triumphantly

Upon His subject thrones. Chastised, I know

The depth to which ambition falls; too mad

Was the attempt, and yet more mad were now

125

Repentance of the irrevocable deed:—

Therefore I chose this ruin, with the glory

Of not to be subdued, before the shame

Of reconciling me with Him who reigns

By coward cession. — Nor was I alone,

130

Nor am I now, nor shall I be alone;

And there was hope, and there may still be hope,

For many suffrages among His vassals

Hailed me their lord and king, and many still

Are mine, and many more, perchance shall be.

135

Thus vanquished, though in fact victorious,

I left His seat of empire, from mine eye

Shooting forth poisonous lightning, while my words

With inauspicious thunderings shook Heaven,

Proclaiming vengeance, public as my wrong,

140

And imprecating on His prostrate slaves

Rapine, and death, and outrage. Then I sailed

Over the mighty fabric of the world —

A pirate ambushed in its pathless sands,

A lynx crouched watchfully among its caves

145

And craggy shores; and I have wandered over

The expanse of these wide wildernesses

In this great ship, whose bulk is now dissolved

In the light breathings of the invisible wind,

And which the sea has made a dustless ruin,

150

Seeking ever a mountain, through whose forests

I seek a man, whom I must now compel

To keep his word with me. I came arrayed

In tempest, and although my power could well

Bridle the forest winds in their career,

155

For other causes I forbore to soothe

Their fury to Favonian gentleness;

I could and would not;

[ASIDE.]

(thus I wake in him

A love of magic art). Let not this tempest,

Nor the succeeding calm excite thy wonder;

160

For by my art the sun would turn as pale

As his weak sister with unwonted fear;

And in my wisdom are the orbs of Heaven

Written as in a record; I have pierced

The flaming circles of their wondrous spheres

165

And know them as thou knowest every corner

Of this dim spot. Let it not seem to thee

That I boast vainly; wouldst thou that I work

A charm over this waste and savage wood,

This Babylon of crags and aged trees,

170

Filling its leafy coverts with a horror

Thrilling and strange? I am the friendless guest

Of these wild oaks and pines — and as from thee

I have received the hospitality

Of this rude place, I offer thee the fruit

175

Of years of toil in recompense; whate’er

Thy wildest dream presented to thy thought

As object of desire, that shall be thine.

. . .

And thenceforth shall so firm an amity

‘Twixt thee and me be, that neither Fortune,

180

The monstrous phantom which pursues success,

That careful miser, that free prodigal,

Who ever alternates, with changeful hand,

Evil and good, reproach and fame; nor Time,

That lodestar of the ages, to whose beam

185

The winged years speed o’er the intervals

Of their unequal revolutions; nor

Heaven itself, whose beautiful bright stars

Rule and adorn the world, can ever make

The least division between thee and me,

190

Since now I find a refuge in thy favour.

_146 wide glassy wildernesses Rossetti.

_150 Seeking forever cj. Forman.

_154 forest]fiercest cj. Rossetti.

SCENE 3. THE DAEMON TEMPTS JUSTINA, WHO IS A CHRISTIAN.

DAEMON:

Abyss of Hell! I call on thee,

Thou wild misrule of thine own anarchy!

From thy prison-house set free

The spirits of voluptuous death,

5

That with their mighty breath

They may destroy a world of virgin thoughts;

Let her chaste mind with fancies thick as motes

Be peopled from thy shadowy deep,

Till her guiltless fantasy

10

Full to overflowing be!

And with sweetest harmony,

Let birds, and flowers, and leaves, and all things move

To love, only to love.

Let nothing meet her eyes

15

But signs of Love’s soft victories;

Let nothing meet her ear

But sounds of Love’s sweet sorrow,

So that from faith no succour she may borrow,

But, guided by my spirit blind

20

And in a magic snare entwined,

She may now seek Cyprian.

Begin, while I in silence bind

My voice, when thy sweet song thou hast began.

A VOICE [WITHIN]:

What is the glory far above

All else in human life?

ALL:

25

Love! love!

[WHILE THESE WORDS ARE SUNG, THE DAEMON GOES OUT AT ONE DOOR, AND JUSTINA ENTERS AT ANOTHER.]

THE FIRST VOICE:

There is no form in which the fire

Of love its traces has impressed not.

Man lives far more in love’s desire

Than by life’s breath, soon possessed not.

30

If all that lives must love or die,

All shapes on earth, or sea, or sky,

With one consent to Heaven cry

That the glory far above

All else in life is —

ALL:

Love! oh, Love!

JUSTINA:

35

Thou melancholy Thought which art

So flattering and so sweet, to thee

When did I give the liberty

Thus to afflict my heart?

What is the cause of this new Power

40

Which doth my fevered being move,

Momently raging more and more?

What subtle Pain is kindled now

Which from my heart doth overflow

Into my senses? —

ALL:

Love! oh, Love!

JUSTINA:

45

’Tis that enamoured Nightingale

Who gives me the reply;

He ever tells the same soft tale

Of passion and of constancy

To his mate, who rapt and fond,

50

Listening sits, a bough beyond.

Be silent, Nightingale — no more

Make me think, in hearing thee

Thus tenderly thy love deplore,

If a bird can feel his so,

55

What a man would feel for me.

And, voluptuous Vine, O thou

Who seekest most when least pursuing —

To the trunk thou interlacest

Art the verdure which embracest,

60

And the weight which is its ruin —

No more, with green embraces, Vine,

Make me think on what thou lovest —

For whilst thus thy boughs entwine

I fear lest thou shouldst teach me, sophist,

65

How arms might be entangled too.

Light-enchanted Sunflower, thou

Who gazest ever true and tender

On the sun’s revolving splendour!

Follow not his faithless glance

70

With thy faded countenance,

Nor teach my beating heart to fear,

If leaves can mourn without a tear,

How eyes must weep! O Nightingale,

Cease from thy enamoured tale —

75

Leafy Vine, unwreathe thy bower,

Restless Sunflower, cease to move —

Or tell me all, what poisonous Power

Ye use against me —

ALL:

Love! Love! Love!

JUSTINA:

It cannot be! — Whom have I ever loved?

80

Trophies of my oblivion and disdain,

Floro and Lelio did I not reject?

And Cyprian? —

[SHE BECOMES TROUBLED AT THE NAME OF CYPRIAN.]

Did I not requite him

With such severity, that he has fled

Where none has ever heard of him again? —

85

Alas! I now begin to fear that this

May be the occasion whence desire grows bold,

As if there were no danger. From the moment

That I pronounced to my own listening heart,

‘Cyprian is absent!’— O me miserable!

I know not what I feel!

[MORE CALMLY.]

90

It must be pity

To think that such a man, whom all the world

Admired, should be forgot by all the world,

And I the cause.

[SHE AGAIN BECOMES TROUBLED.]

And yet if it were pity,

Floro and Lelio might have equal share,

95

For they are both imprisoned for my sake.

[CALMLY.]

Alas! what reasonings are these? it is

Enough I pity him, and that, in vain,

Without this ceremonious subtlety.

And, woe is me! I know not where to find him now,

100

Even should I seek him through this wide world.

[ENTER DAEMON.]

DAEMON:

Follow, and I will lead thee where he is.

JUSTINA:

And who art thou, who hast found entrance hither,

Into my chamber through the doors and locks?

Art thou a monstrous shadow which my madness

Has formed in the idle air?

DAEMON:

105

No. I am one

Called by the Thought which tyrannizes thee

From his eternal dwelling; who this day

Is pledged to bear thee unto Cyprian.

JUSTINA:

So shall thy promise fail. This agony

110

Of passion which afflicts my heart and soul

May sweep imagination in its storm;

The will is firm.

DAEMON:

Already half is done

In the imagination of an act.

The sin incurred, the pleasure then remains;

115

Let not the will stop half-way on the road.

JUSTINA:

I will not be discouraged, nor despair,

Although I thought it, and although ’tis true

That thought is but a prelude to the deed:—

Thought is not in my power, but action is:

120

I will not move my foot to follow thee.

DAEMON:

But a far mightier wisdom than thine own

Exerts itself within thee, with such power

Compelling thee to that which it inclines

That it shall force thy step; how wilt thou then

Resist, Justina?

JUSTINA:

By my free-will.

DAEMON:

125

I

Must force thy will.

JUSTINA:

It is invincible;

It were not free if thou hadst power upon it.

[HE DRAWS, BUT CANNOT MOVE HER.]

DAEMON:

Come, where a pleasure waits thee.

JUSTINA:

It were bought

Too dear.

DAEMON:

’Twill soothe thy heart to softest peace.

JUSTINA:

’Tis dread captivity.

DAEMON:

130

’Tis joy, ’tis glory.

JUSTINA:

’Tis shame, ’tis torment, ’tis despair.

DAEMON:

But how

Canst thou defend thyself from that or me,

If my power drags thee onward?

JUSTINA:

My defence

Consists in God.

[HE VAINLY ENDEAVOURS TO FORCE HER, AND AT LAST RELEASES HER.]

DAEMON:

Woman, thou hast subdued me,

135

Only by not owning thyself subdued.

But since thou thus findest defence in God,

I will assume a feigned form, and thus

Make thee a victim of my baffled rage.

For I will mask a spirit in thy form

140

Who will betray thy name to infamy,

And doubly shall I triumph in thy loss,

First by dishonouring thee, and then by turning

False pleasure to true ignominy.

[EXIT.]

JUSTINA:

I

Appeal to Heaven against thee; so that Heaven

145

May scatter thy delusions, and the blot

Upon my fame vanish in idle thought,

Even as flame dies in the envious air,

And as the floweret wanes at morning frost;

And thou shouldst never — But, alas! to whom

150

Do I still speak? — Did not a man but now

Stand here before me? — No, I am alone,

And yet I saw him. Is he gone so quickly?

Or can the heated mind engender shapes

From its own fear? Some terrible and strange

155

Peril is near. Lisander! father! lord!

Livia! —

[ENTER LISANDER AND LIVIA.]

LISANDER:

Oh, my daughter! What?

LIVIA:

What!

JUSTINA:

Saw you

A man go forth from my apartment now? —

I scarce contain myself!

LISANDER:

A man here!

JUSTINA:

Have you not seen him?

LIVIA:

No, Lady.

JUSTINA: I saw him.

160

LISANDER: ’Tis impossible; the doors

Which led to this apartment were all locked.

LIVIA [ASIDE]:

I daresay it was Moscon whom she saw,

For he was locked up in my room.

LISANDER:

It must

Have been some image of thy fantasy.

165

Such melancholy as thou feedest is

Skilful in forming such in the vain air

Out of the motes and atoms of the day.

LIVIA:

My master’s in the right.

JUSTINA:

Oh, would it were

Delusion; but I fear some greater ill.

170

I feel as if out of my bleeding bosom

My heart was torn in fragments; ay,

Some mortal spell is wrought against my frame;

So potent was the charm that, had not God

Shielded my humble innocence from wrong,

175

I should have sought my sorrow and my shame

With willing steps. — Livia, quick, bring my cloak,

For I must seek refuge from these extremes

Even in the temple of the highest God

Where secretly the faithful worship.

LIVIA:

Here.

JUSTINA [PUTTING ON HER CLOAK]:

180

In this, as in a shroud of snow, may I

Quench the consuming fire in which I burn,

Wasting away!

LISANDER:

And I will go with thee.

LIVIA:

When I once see them safe out of the house

I shall breathe freely.

JUSTINA:

So do I confide

In thy just favour, Heaven!

LISANDER:

185

Let us go.

JUSTINA:

Thine is the cause, great God! turn for my sake,

And for Thine own, mercifully to me!

_18 she may]may she 1824.

_36 flattering Boscombe manuscript; fluttering 1824.

_58 To]Who to cj. Rossetti.

_63 whilst thus Rossetti, Forman, Dowden; whilst thou thus 1824.

_89 me miserable]miserable me editions 1839.

_123 inclines]inclines to cj. Rossetti.

_179 Where Rossetti; Which 1824.

Stanzas From Calderon’s Cisma De Inglaterra.

Translated by Medwin and Corrected by Shelley.

1.

Hast thou not seen, officious with delight,

Move through the illumined air about the flower

The Bee, that fears to drink its purple light,

Lest danger lurk within that Rose’s bower?

5

Hast thou not marked the moth’s enamoured flight

About the Taper’s flame at evening hour;

‘Till kindle in that monumental fire

His sunflower wings their own funereal pyre?

2.

My heart, its wishes trembling to unfold.

10

Thus round the Rose and Taper hovering came,

‘And Passion’s slave, Distrust, in ashes cold.

Smothered awhile, but could not quench the flame,’—

Till Love, that grows by disappointment bold,

And Opportunity, had conquered Shame;

15

And like the Bee and Moth, in act to close,

‘I burned my wings, and settled on the Rose.’

[Published by Medwin, “Life of Shelley”, 1847, with Shelley’s corrections in ‘’.]

Scenes From the Faust of Goethe.

SCENE 1. — PROLOGUE IN HEAVEN. THE LORD AND THE HOST OF HEAVEN. ENTER THREE ARCHANGELS.

RAPHAEL:

The sun makes music as of old

Amid the rival spheres of Heaven,

On its predestined circle rolled

With thunder speed: the Angels even

5

Draw strength from gazing on its glance,

Though none its meaning fathom may:—

The world’s unwithered countenance

Is bright as at Creation’s day.

GABRIEL:

And swift and swift, with rapid lightness,

10

The adorned Earth spins silently,

Alternating Elysian brightness

With deep and dreadful night; the sea

Foams in broad billows from the deep

Up to the rocks, and rocks and Ocean,

15

Onward, with spheres which never sleep,

Are hurried in eternal motion.

MICHAEL:

And tempests in contention roar

From land to sea, from sea to land;

And, raging, weave a chain of power,

20

Which girds the earth, as with a band. —

A flashing desolation there,

Flames before the thunder’s way;

But Thy servants, Lord, revere

The gentle changes of Thy day.

CHORUS OF THE THREE:

25

The Angels draw strength from Thy glance,

Though no one comprehend Thee may; —

Thy world’s unwithered countenance

Is bright as on Creation’s day.

The sun sounds, according to ancient custom,

In the song of emulation of his brother-spheres.

And its fore-written circle

Fulfils with a step of thunder.

Its countenance gives the Angels strength

Though no one can fathom it.

The incredible high works

Are excellent as at the first day.

GABRIEL:

And swift, and inconceivably swift

The adornment of earth winds itself round,

And exchanges Paradise-clearness

With deep dreadful night.

The sea foams in broad waves

From its deep bottom, up to the rocks,

And rocks and sea are torn on together

In the eternal swift course of the spheres.

MICHAEL:

And storms roar in emulation

From sea to land, from land to sea,

And make, raging, a chain

Of deepest operation round about.

There flames a flashing destruction

Before the path of the thunderbolt.

But Thy servants, Lord, revere

The gentle alternations of Thy day.

CHORUS:

Thy countenance gives the Angels strength,

Though none can comprehend Thee:

And all Thy lofty works

Are excellent as at the first day.

[ENTER MEPHISTOPHELES.]

MEPHISTOPHELES:

As thou, O Lord, once more art kind enough

30

To interest Thyself in our affairs,

And ask, ‘How goes it with you there below?’

And as indulgently at other times

Thou tookest not my visits in ill part,

Thou seest me here once more among Thy household.

35

Though I should scandalize this company,

You will excuse me if I do not talk

In the high style which they think fashionable;

My pathos certainly would make You laugh too,

Had You not long since given over laughing.

40

Nothing know I to say of suns and worlds;

I observe only how men plague themselves; —

The little god o’ the world keeps the same stamp,

As wonderful as on creation’s day:—

A little better would he live, hadst Thou

45

Not given him a glimpse of Heaven’s light

Which he calls reason, and employs it only

To live more beastlily than any beast.

With reverence to Your Lordship be it spoken,

He’s like one of those long-legged grasshoppers,

50

Who flits and jumps about, and sings for ever

The same old song i’ the grass. There let him lie,

Burying his nose in every heap of dung.

THE LORD:

Have you no more to say? Do you come here

Always to scold, and cavil, and complain?

55

Seems nothing ever right to you on earth?

MEPHISTOPHELES:

No, Lord! I find all there, as ever, bad at best.

Even I am sorry for man’s days of sorrow;

I could myself almost give up the pleasure

Of plaguing the poor things.

THE LORD:

Knowest thou Faust?

MEPHISTOPHELES:

The Doctor?

THE LORD:

Ay; My servant Faust.

MEPHISTOPHELES:

60

In truth

He serves You in a fashion quite his own;

And the fool’s meat and drink are not of earth.

His aspirations bear him on so far

That he is half aware of his own folly,

65

For he demands from Heaven its fairest star,

And from the earth the highest joy it bears,

Yet all things far, and all things near, are vain

To calm the deep emotions of his breast.

THE LORD:

Though he now serves Me in a cloud of error,

70

I will soon lead him forth to the clear day.

When trees look green, full well the gardener knows

That fruits and blooms will deck the coming year.

MEPHISTOPHELES:

What will You bet? — now am sure of winning —

Only, observe You give me full permission

To lead him softly on my path.

THE LORD:

75

As long

As he shall live upon the earth, so long

Is nothing unto thee forbidden — Man

Must err till he has ceased to struggle.

MEPHISTOPHELES:

Thanks.

And that is all I ask; for willingly

80

I never make acquaintance with the dead.

The full fresh cheeks of youth are food for me,

And if a corpse knocks, I am not at home.

For I am like a cat — I like to play

A little with the mouse before I eat it.

THE LORD:

85

Well, well! it is permitted thee. Draw thou

His spirit from its springs; as thou find’st power

Seize him and lead him on thy downward path;

And stand ashamed when failure teaches thee

That a good man, even in his darkest longings,

Is well aware of the right way.

MEPHISTOPHELES:

90

Well and good.

I am not in much doubt about my bet,

And if I lose, then ’tis Your turn to crow;

Enjoy Your triumph then with a full breast.

Ay; dust shall he devour, and that with pleasure,

95

Like my old paramour, the famous Snake.

THE LORD:

Pray come here when it suits you; for I never

Had much dislike for people of your sort.

And, among all the Spirits who rebelled,

The knave was ever the least tedious to Me.

100

The active spirit of man soon sleeps, and soon

He seeks unbroken quiet; therefore I

Have given him the Devil for a companion,

Who may provoke him to some sort of work,

And must create forever. — But ye, pure

105

Children of God, enjoy eternal beauty; —

Let that which ever operates and lives

Clasp you within the limits of its love;

And seize with sweet and melancholy thoughts

The floating phantoms of its loveliness.

[HEAVEN CLOSES; THE ARCHANGELS EXEUNT.]

MEPHISTOPHELES:

110

From time to time I visit the old fellow,

And I take care to keep on good terms with Him.

Civil enough is the same God Almighty,

To talk so freely with the Devil himself.

[Published in part (Scene 2) in “The Liberal”, No. 1, 1822; in full, by Mrs. Shelley, “Posthumous Poems”, 1824.]

_28 (RAPHAEL: Such is a literal translation of this astonishing chorus; it is impossible to represent in another language the melody of the versification; even the volatile strength and delicacy of the ideas escape in the crucible of translation, and the reader is surprised to find a caput mortuum. —[SHELLEY’S NOTE.])

_38 certainly would editions 1839; would certainly 1824.

_47 beastlily 1824; beastily editions 1839.

SCENE 2. — MAY-DAY NIGHT. THE HARTZ MOUNTAIN, A DESOLATE COUNTRY. FAUST, MEPHISTOPHELES.

MEPHISTOPHELES:

Would you not like a broomstick? As for me

I wish I had a good stout ram to ride;

For we are still far from the appointed place.

FAUST:

This knotted staff is help enough for me,

5

Whilst I feel fresh upon my legs. What good

Is there in making short a pleasant way?

To creep along the labyrinths of the vales,

And climb those rocks, where ever-babbling springs,

Precipitate themselves in waterfalls,

10

Is the true sport that seasons such a path.

Already Spring kindles the birchen spray,

And the hoar pines already feel her breath:

Shall she not work also within our limbs?

MEPHISTOPHELES:

Nothing of such an influence do I feel.

15

My body is all wintry, and I wish

The flowers upon our path were frost and snow.

But see how melancholy rises now,

Dimly uplifting her belated beam,

The blank unwelcome round of the red moon,

20

And gives so bad a light, that every step

One stumbles ‘gainst some crag. With your permission,

I’ll call on Ignis-fatuus to our aid:

I see one yonder burning jollily.

Halloo, my friend! may I request that you

25

Would favour us with your bright company?

Why should you blaze away there to no purpose?

Pray be so good as light us up this way.

IGNIS-FATUUS:

With reverence be it spoken, I will try

To overcome the lightness of my nature;

30

Our course, you know, is generally zigzag.

MEPHISTOPHELES:

Ha, ha! your worship thinks you have to deal

With men. Go straight on, in the Devil’s name,

Or I shall puff your flickering life out.

IGNIS-FATUUS:

Well,

I see you are the master of the house;

35

I will accommodate myself to you.

Only consider that to-night this mountain

Is all enchanted, and if Jack-a-lantern

Shows you his way, though you should miss your own,

You ought not to be too exact with him.

FAUST, MEPHISTOPHELES, AND IGNIS-FATUUS, IN ALTERNATE CHORUS:

40

The limits of the sphere of dream,

The bounds of true and false, are past.

Lead us on, thou wandering Gleam,

Lead us onward, far and fast,

To the wide, the desert waste.

45

But see, how swift advance and shift

Trees behind trees, row by row —

How, clift by clift, rocks bend and lift

Their frowning foreheads as we go.

The giant-snouted crags, ho! ho!

50

How they snort, and how they blow!

Through the mossy sods and stones,

Stream and streamlet hurry down —

A rushing throng! A sound of song

Beneath the vault of Heaven is blown!

55

Sweet notes of love, the speaking tones

Of this bright day, sent down to say

That Paradise on Earth is known,

Resound around, beneath, above.

All we hope and all we love

60

Finds a voice in this blithe strain,

Which wakens hill and wood and rill,

And vibrates far o’er field and vale,

And which Echo, like the tale

Of old times, repeats again.

65

To-whoo! to-whoo! near, nearer now

The sound of song, the rushing throng!

Are the screech, the lapwing, and the jay,

All awake as if ’twere day?

See, with long legs and belly wide,

70

A salamander in the brake!

Every root is like a snake,

And along the loose hillside,

With strange contortions through the night,

Curls, to seize or to affright;

75

And, animated, strong, and many,

They dart forth polypus-antennae,

To blister with their poison spume

The wanderer. Through the dazzling gloom

The many-coloured mice, that thread

80

The dewy turf beneath our tread,

In troops each other’s motions cross,

Through the heath and through the moss;

And, in legions intertangled,

The fire-flies flit, and swarm, and throng,

85

Till all the mountain depths are spangled.

Tell me, shall we go or stay?

Shall we onward? Come along!

Everything around is swept

Forward, onward, far away!

90

Trees and masses intercept

The sight, and wisps on every side

Are puffed up and multiplied.

MEPHISTOPHELES:

Now vigorously seize my skirt, and gain

This pinnacle of isolated crag.

95

One may observe with wonder from this point,

How Mammon glows among the mountains.

FAUST:

Ay —

And strangely through the solid depth below

A melancholy light, like the red dawn,

Shoots from the lowest gorge of the abyss

100

Of mountains, lightning hitherward: there rise

Pillars of smoke, here clouds float gently by;

Here the light burns soft as the enkindled air,

Or the illumined dust of golden flowers;

And now it glides like tender colours spreading;

105

And now bursts forth in fountains from the earth;

And now it winds, one torrent of broad light,

Through the far valley with a hundred veins;

And now once more within that narrow corner

Masses itself into intensest splendour.

110

And near us, see, sparks spring out of the ground,

Like golden sand scattered upon the darkness;

The pinnacles of that black wall of mountains

That hems us in are kindled.

MEPHISTOPHELES:

Rare: in faith!

Does not Sir Mammon gloriously illuminate

115

His palace for this festival? — it is

A pleasure which you had not known before.

I spy the boisterous guests already.

FAUST:

How

The children of the wind rage in the air!

With what fierce strokes they fall upon my neck!

MEPHISTOPHELES:

120

Cling tightly to the old ribs of the crag.

Beware! for if with them thou warrest

In their fierce flight towards the wilderness,

Their breath will sweep thee into dust, and drag

Thy body to a grave in the abyss.

125

A cloud thickens the night.

Hark! how the tempest crashes through the forest!

The owls fly out in strange affright;

The columns of the evergreen palaces

Are split and shattered;

130

The roots creak, and stretch, and groan;

And ruinously overthrown,

The trunks are crushed and shattered

By the fierce blast’s unconquerable stress.

Over each other crack and crash they all

135

In terrible and intertangled fall;

And through the ruins of the shaken mountain

The airs hiss and howl —

It is not the voice of the fountain,

Nor the wolf in his midnight prowl.

140

Dost thou not hear?

Strange accents are ringing

Aloft, afar, anear?

The witches are singing!

The torrent of a raging wizard song

145

Streams the whole mountain along.

CHORUS OF WITCHES:

The stubble is yellow, the corn is green,

Now to the Brocken the witches go;

The mighty multitude here may be seen

Gathering, wizard and witch, below.

150

Sir Urian is sitting aloft in the air;

Hey over stock! and hey over stone!

‘Twixt witches and incubi, what shall be done?

Tell it who dare! tell it who dare!

A VOICE:

Upon a sow-swine, whose farrows were nine,

155

Old Baubo rideth alone.

CHORUS:

Honour her, to whom honour is due,

Old mother Baubo, honour to you!

An able sow, with old Baubo upon her,

Is worthy of glory, and worthy of honour!

160

The legion of witches is coming behind,

Darkening the night, and outspeeding the wind —

A VOICE:

Which way comest thou?

A VOICE:

Over Ilsenstein;

The owl was awake in the white moonshine;

I saw her at rest in her downy nest,

165

And she stared at me with her broad, bright eyne.

VOICES:

And you may now as well take your course on to Hell,

Since you ride by so fast on the headlong blast.

A VOICE:

She dropped poison upon me as I passed.

Here are the wounds —

CHORUS OF WITCHES:

Come away! come along!

170

The way is wide, the way is long,

But what is that for a Bedlam throng?

Stick with the prong, and scratch with the broom.

The child in the cradle lies strangled at home,

And the mother is clapping her hands. —

SEMICHORUS OF WIZARDS 1:

We glide in

175

Like snails when the women are all away;

And from a house once given over to sin

Woman has a thousand steps to stray.

SEMICHORUS 2:

A thousand steps must a woman take,

Where a man but a single spring will make.

VOICES ABOVE:

180

Come with us, come with us, from Felsensee.

Felumee 1822; Felunsee editions 1824, 1839.

VOICES BELOW:

With what joy would we fly through the upper sky!

We are washed, we are ‘nointed, stark naked are we;

But our toil and our pain are forever in vain.

BOTH CHORUSES:

185

The wind is still, the stars are fled,

The melancholy moon is dead;

The magic notes, like spark on spark,

Drizzle, whistling through the dark. Come away!

VOICES BELOW:

Stay, Oh, stay!

VOICES ABOVE:

190

Out of the crannies of the rocks

Who calls?

VOICES BELOW:

Oh, let me join your flocks!

I, three hundred years have striven

To catch your skirt and mount to Heaven —

And still in vain. Oh, might I be

195

With company akin to me!

BOTH CHORUSES:

Some on a ram and some on a prong,

On poles and on broomsticks we flutter along;

Forlorn is the wight who can rise not to-night.

A HALF-WITCH BELOW:

I have been tripping this many an hour:

200

Are the others already so far before?

No quiet at home, and no peace abroad!

And less methinks is found by the road.

CHORUS OF WITCHES:

Come onward, away! aroint thee, aroint!

A witch to be strong must anoint — anoint —

205

Then every trough will be boat enough;

With a rag for a sail we can sweep through the sky,

Who flies not to-night, when means he to fly?

BOTH CHORUSES:

We cling to the skirt, and we strike on the ground;

Witch-legions thicken around and around;

210

Wizard-swarms cover the heath all over.

[THEY DESCEND.]

MEPHISTOPHELES:

What thronging, dashing, raging, rustling;

What whispering, babbling, hissing, bustling;

What glimmering, spurting, stinking, burning,

As Heaven and Earth were overturning.

215

There is a true witch element about us;

Take hold on me, or we shall be divided:—

Where are you?

FAUST [FROM A DISTANCE]:

Here!

MEPHISTOPHELES:

What!

I must exert my authority in the house.

Place for young Voland! pray make way, good people.

220

Take hold on me, doctor, an with one step

Let us escape from this unpleasant crowd:

They are too mad for people of my sort.

Just there shines a peculiar kind of light —

Something attracts me in those bushes. Come

225

This way: we shall slip down there in a minute.

FAUST:

Spirit of Contradiction! Well, lead on —

’Twere a wise feat indeed to wander out

Into the Brocken upon May-day night,

And then to isolate oneself in scorn,

230

Disgusted with the humours of the time.

MEPHISTOPHELES:

See yonder, round a many-coloured flame

A merry club is huddled altogether:

Even with such little people as sit there

One would not be alone.

FAUST:

Would that I were

235

Up yonder in the glow and whirling smoke,

Where the blind million rush impetuously

To meet the evil ones; there might I solve

Many a riddle that torments me.

MEPHISTOPHELES:

Yet

Many a riddle there is tied anew

240

Inextricably. Let the great world rage!

We will stay here safe in the quiet dwellings.

’Tis an old custom. Men have ever built

Their own small world in the great world of all.

I see young witches naked there, and old ones

245

Wisely attired with greater decency.

Be guided now by me, and you shall buy

A pound of pleasure with a dram of trouble.

I hear them tune their instruments — one must

Get used to this damned scraping. Come, I’ll lead you

250

Among them; and what there you do and see,

As a fresh compact ‘twixt us two shall be.

How say you now? this space is wide enough —

Look forth, you cannot see the end of it —

An hundred bonfires burn in rows, and they

255

Who throng around them seem innumerable:

Dancing and drinking, jabbering, making love,

And cooking, are at work. Now tell me, friend,

What is there better in the world than this?

FAUST:

In introducing us, do you assume

260

The character of Wizard or of Devil?

MEPHISTOPHELES:

In truth, I generally go about

In strict incognito; and yet one likes

To wear one’s orders upon gala days.

I have no ribbon at my knee; but here

265

At home, the cloven foot is honourable.

See you that snail there? — she comes creeping up,

And with her feeling eyes hath smelt out something.

I could not, if I would, mask myself here.

Come now, we’ll go about from fire to fire:

270

I’ll be the Pimp, and you shall be the Lover.

[TO SOME OLD WOMEN, WHO ARE SITTING ROUND A HEAP OF GLIMMERING COALS.]

Old gentlewomen, what do you do out here?

You ought to be with the young rioters

Right in the thickest of the revelry —

But every one is best content at home.

General.

275

Who dare confide in right or a just claim?

So much as I had done for them! and now —

With women and the people ’tis the same,

Youth will stand foremost ever — age may go

To the dark grave unhonoured.

MINISTER:

Nowadays

280

People assert their rights: they go too far;

But as for me, the good old times I praise;

Then we were all in all —’twas something worth

One’s while to be in place and wear a star;

That was indeed the golden age on earth.

PARVENU:

285

We too are active, and we did and do

What we ought not, perhaps; and yet we now

Will seize, whilst all things are whirled round and round,

A spoke of Fortune’s wheel, and keep our ground.

AUTHOR:

Who now can taste a treatise of deep sense

290

And ponderous volume? ’tis impertinence

To write what none will read, therefore will I

To please the young and thoughtless people try.

MEPHISTOPHELES [WHO AT ONCE APPEARS TO HAVE GROWN VERY OLD]:

I

find the people ripe for the last day,

Since I last came up to the wizard mountain;

295

And as my little cask runs turbid now,

So is the world drained to the dregs.

PEDLAR-WITCH:

Look here,

Gentlemen; do not hurry on so fast;

And lose the chance of a good pennyworth.

I have a pack full of the choicest wares

300

Of every sort, and yet in all my bundle

Is nothing like what may be found on earth;

Nothing that in a moment will make rich

Men and the world with fine malicious mischief —

There is no dagger drunk with blood; no bowl

305

From which consuming poison may be drained

By innocent and healthy lips; no jewel,

The price of an abandoned maiden’s shame;

No sword which cuts the bond it cannot loose,

Or stabs the wearer’s enemy in the back;

No —

MEPHISTOPHELES:

310

Gossip, you know little of these times.

What has been, has been; what is done, is past,

They shape themselves into the innovations

They breed, and innovation drags us with it.

The torrent of the crowd sweeps over us:

315

You think to impel, and are yourself impelled.

FAUST:

What is that yonder?

MEPHISTOPHELES:

Mark her well. It is

Lilith.

FAUST:

Who?

MEPHISTOPHELES:

Lilith, the first wife of Adam.

Beware of her fair hair, for she excels

All women in the magic of her locks;

320

And when she winds them round a young man’s neck,

She will not ever set him free again.

FAUST:

There sit a girl and an old woman — they

Seem to be tired with pleasure and with play.

MEPHISTOPHELES:

There is no rest to-night for any one:

325

When one dance ends another is begun;

Come, let us to it. We shall have rare fun.

[FAUST DANCES AND SINGS WITH A GIRL, AND MEPHISTOPHELES WITH AN OLD WOMAN.]

FAUST:

I had once a lovely dream

In which I saw an apple-tree,

Where two fair apples with their gleam

330

To climb and taste attracted me.

THE GIRL:

She with apples you desired

From Paradise came long ago:

With you I feel that if required,

Such still within my garden grow.

. . .

PROCTO-PHANTASMIST:

335

What is this cursed multitude about?

Have we not long since proved to demonstration

That ghosts move not on ordinary feet?

But these are dancing just like men and women.

THE GIRL:

What does he want then at our ball?

FAUST:

Oh! he

340

Is far above us all in his conceit:

Whilst we enjoy, he reasons of enjoyment;

And any step which in our dance we tread,

If it be left out of his reckoning,

Is not to be considered as a step.

345

There are few things that scandalize him not:

And when you whirl round in the circle now,

As he went round the wheel in his old mill,

He says that you go wrong in all respects,

Especially if you congratulate him

Upon the strength of the resemblance.

PROCTO-PHANTASMIST:

350

Fly!

Vanish! Unheard-of impudence! What, still there!

In this enlightened age too, since you have been

Proved not to exist! — But this infernal brood

Will hear no reason and endure no rule.

355

Are we so wise, and is the POND still haunted?

How long have I been sweeping out this rubbish

Of superstition, and the world will not

Come clean with all my pains! — it is a case

Unheard of!

THE GIRL:

Then leave off teasing us so.

PROCTO-PHANTASMIST:

360

I tell you, spirits, to your faces now,

That I should not regret this despotism

Of spirits, but that mine can wield it not.

To-night I shall make poor work of it,

Yet I will take a round with you, and hope

365

Before my last step in the living dance

To beat the poet and the devil together.

MEPHISTOPHELES:

At last he will sit down in some foul puddle;

That is his way of solacing himself;

Until some leech, diverted with his gravity,

370

Cures him of spirits and the spirit together.

[TO FAUST, WHO HAS SECEDED FROM THE DANCE.]

Why do you let that fair girl pass from you,

Who sung so sweetly to you in the dance?

FAUST:

A red mouse in the middle of her singing

Sprung from her mouth.

MEPHISTOPHELES:

That was all right, my friend:

375

Be it enough that the mouse was not gray.

Do not disturb your hour of happiness

With close consideration of such trifles.

FAUST:

Then saw I—

MEPHISTOPHELES:

What?

FAUST:

Seest thou not a pale,

Fair girl, standing alone, far, far away?

380

She drags herself now forward with slow steps,

And seems as if she moved with shackled feet:

I cannot overcome the thought that she

Is like poor Margaret.

MEPHISTOPHELES:

Let it be — pass on —

No good can come of it — it is not well

385

To meet it — it is an enchanted phantom,

A lifeless idol; with its numbing look,

It freezes up the blood of man; and they

Who meet its ghastly stare are turned to stone,

Like those who saw Medusa.

FAUST:

Oh, too true!

390

Her eyes are like the eyes of a fresh corpse

Which no beloved hand has closed, alas!

That is the breast which Margaret yielded to me —

Those are the lovely limbs which I enjoyed!

MEPHISTOPHELES:

It is all magic, poor deluded fool!

395

She looks to every one like his first love.

FAUST:

Oh, what delight! what woe! I cannot turn

My looks from her sweet piteous countenance.

How strangely does a single blood-red line,

Not broader than the sharp edge of a knife,

Adorn her lovely neck!

MEPHISTOPHELES:

400

Ay, she can carry

Her head under her arm upon occasion;

Perseus has cut it off for her. These pleasures

End in delusion. — Gain this rising ground,

It is as airy here as in a . . .

405

And if I am not mightily deceived,

I see a theatre. — What may this mean?

ATTENDANT:

Quite a new piece, the last of seven, for ’tis

The custom now to represent that number.

’Tis written by a Dilettante, and

410

The actors who perform are Dilettanti;

Excuse me, gentlemen; but I must vanish.

I am a Dilettante curtain-lifter.

_33 shall puff 1824; will blow 1822.

_48 frowning]fawning 1822.

_70 brake 1824; lake 1822.

_117 How 1824; Now 1822.

_132 shattered]scattered Rossetti.

_150 Urian]Urean editions 1824, 1839.

_165 eyne 1839, 2nd edition; eye 1822, 1824, 1839, 1st edition.

_180 Felsensee 1862 (“Relics of Shelley”, page 96);

_183 are editions 1839; is 1822, 1824.

_217 What! wanting, 1822.

_254 An 1824; A editions 1839.

_264 my wanting, 1822.

_275 right editions 1824, 1839; night 1822.

_285 Parvenu: (Note) A sort of fundholder 1822, editions 1824, 1839.

_290 ponderous 1824; wonderous 1822.

_327-_334 So Boscombe manuscript (“Westminster Review”, July, 1870); wanting, 1822, 1824, 1839.

_335 Procto-Phantasmist]Brocto-Phantasmist editions 1824, 1839.

_355 pond wanting in Boscombe manuscript.

_392 breast editions 1839; heart 1822, 1824.

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Last updated Wednesday, March 5, 2014 at 22:30