The Minstrelsy of the Scottish Border, by Walter Scott

Proud Lady Margaret.

This Ballad was communicated to the Editor by Mr HAMILTON, Music-seller, Edinburgh, with whose Mother it had been a, favourite. Two verses and one line were wanting, which are here supplied from a different Ballad, having a plot somewhat similar. These verses are the 6th and 9th.

’Twas on a night, an evening bright,

When the dew began to fa’,

Lady Margaret was walking up and down,

Looking o’er her castle wa’.

She looked east, and she looked west,

To see what she could spy,

When a gallant knight came in her sight,

And to the gate drew nigh.

“You seem to be no gentleman,

“You wear your boots so wide;

“But you seem to be some cunning hunter,

“You wear the horn so syde.”282

“I am no cunning hunter,” he said,

“Nor ne’er intend to be;

“But I am come to this castle

“To seek the love of thee;

“And if you do not grant me love,

“This night for thee I’ll die.”

“If you should die for me, sir knight,

“There’s few for you will mane,

“For mony a better has died for me,

“Whose graves are growing green.

“But ye maun read my riddle,” she said,

“And answer my questions three;

“And but ye read them right,” she said,

“Gae stretch ye out and die. —

“Now, what is the flower, the ae first flower,

“Springs either on moor or dale?

“And what is the bird, the bonnie bonnie bird,

“Sings on the evening gale?”

“The primrose is the ae first flower,

“Springs either on moor or dale;

“And the thistlecock is the bonniest bird;

“Sings on the evening gale.”

“But what’s the little coin,” she said,

“Wald buy my castle bound?

“And what’s the little boat,” she said,

“Can sail the world all round?”

“O hey, how mony small pennies

“Make thrice three thousand pound?

“Or hey, how mony small fishes

“Swim a’ the salt sea round.”

“I think you maun be my match,” she said,

“My match, and something mair;

“You are the first e’er got the grant

Of love frae my father’s heir.

“My father was lord of nine castles,

“My mother lady of three;

“My father was lord of nine castles,

“And there’s nane to heir but me.

“And round about a’ thae castles,

“You may baith plow and saw,

“And on the fifteenth day of May,

“The meadows they will maw.”

“O hald your tongue, lady Margaret,” he said,

“For loud I hear you lie!

“Your father was lord of nine castles,

“Your mother was lady of three;

“Your father was lord of nine castles,

“But ye fa’ heir to but three.

“And round about a’ thae castles,

“You may baith plow and saw,

“But on the fifteenth day of May

“The meadows will not maw.

“I am your brother Willie,” he said,

“I trow ye ken na me;

“I came to humble your haughty heart,

“Has gar’d sae mony die.”

“If ye be my brother Willie,” she said,

“As I trow weel ye be,

“This night I’ll neither eat nor drink,

“But gae alang wi’ thee.”

“O hold your tongue, lady Margaret,” he said.

“Again I hear you lie;

“For ye’ve unwashen hands, and ye’ve unwashen feet,283

“To gae to clay wi’ me.

“For the wee worms are my bedfellows,

“And cauld clay is my sheets;

“And when the stormy winds do blow,

“My body lies and sleeps.”

282 Syde— Long or low.]

283 Unwashen hands and unwashen feet— Alluding to the custom of washing and dressing dead bodies.]

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Last updated Wednesday, March 5, 2014 at 22:29