The Art of Living in Australia, by Philip E. Muskett

Chapter XIX.

Fifty Recipes for Meat Dishes

Cookery of Meat.

The principal methods of cooking meat are roasting, baking, boiling, stewing, broiling, braising, and frying. Of these methods roasting and baking are conducted on the same principle — dry heat; boiling and stewing are often spoken of as if they were the same, but this is quite a mistake. When we boil a joint we plunge it into boiling water, and this water should cover it completely; but when meat is stewed it must be cooked in a very small quantity of water, and never allowed to boil. Water boils at 212, but simmering heat is 180, and meat cannot be properly stewed if it is cooked quicker than this. One of the great faults of English cooks is that they cook too quickly, and it is particularly necessary in stewing to cook slowly, because we want to extract and blend all the different flavours of the various substances, which are necessary for a good and savoury stew. When boiling meat for table plunge it into boiling water, and then reduce the heat; but when broth or soup is to be made it must be put into cold water, so that the goodness may be drawn from it. Corned beef or pork should also be placed in cold water and heated gradually, so that some of the salt is drawn out. The frying-pan should be discarded from the kitchen, at least as far as steaks and chops are concerned; grilling or broiling is by far the best method of cooking them. Meat unless it is very carefully fried is tough and greasy, yet the same piece of meat if grilled or stewed would be tender and nutritious. There is often a prejudice against meat twice cooked, but the most delicate ENTREES that are so highly esteemed by many are only re-cooked meat. It is the time and care expended on it that makes it so delicious. Even in plain cooking there is no reason why the homely dish of hash should not be appetizing and wholesome. I trust that the following recipes, if carefully carried out, will prove this to be true.

Steak and Kidney Pie

2 lbs. Steak — 5d.

2 Kidneys — 1 1/2d.

1 lb. Flour

1/2 lb. Dripping

1 gill Water

Pepper and Salt — 2d.

Total Cost — 81/2 d.

Time — One Hour and a Half

Mix a teaspoonful of flour in a plate with some pepper and salt, slice up the meat into pieces about three inches long by two broad, dip each piece lightly in the flour; skin and slice up the kidneys, and cut the fat into small pieces. Roll a piece of kidney and a piece of fat alternatively in the slices of meat, pile high in a dish, and pour in a gill of water or stock. Make a short crust by directions given for short pastry, wet the edge of the dish and line it with a strip of the paste, wet this strip again with water and cover the dish with paste; trim off the edge, cut a small piece out of the centre of the pie, and ornament it with a few leaves cut out of the paste trimmings. Brush over with water and bake in a moderate oven for one hour and a half. As soon as the crust has acquired some colour, cover with a piece of paper well rubbed with dripping.

Steak and Kidney Pudding

2 lbs. Steak — 5d.

2 Kidneys — 1 1/2d.

1 lb. Flour — 2d.

1/2 lb. Suet

1/2 pint Water

Pepper and Salt — 1 1/2d.

Total Cost — 10d.

Time — Three Hours

Make a dry crust, by directions given elsewhere, of the flour, suet, and butter. Rub the pudding basin well with dripping, roll out the crust, take two-thirds and line the basin, well pressing the crust in. Slice up the meat and kidney, season with pepper and salt, pile lightly in the basin, pour in half a gill of water, wet the edge of the crust. Roll out the piece left, and cover the pudding securely. Dip a cloth in boiling water, put it over the top, tie it round with string, and pin or tie the ends of the cloth over the top. Plunge into plenty of boiling water, and boil for three hours. Take it up, take off the cloth, turn it out of the basin on to a hot dish, and serve hot.

Stewed Kidneys and Macaroni

6 Kidneys — 6d.

1 gill Stock

1 oz. Butter

2 oz. Macaroni

Parsley, Pepper, and Salt — 2 1/2d.

Total Cost — 81/2 d.

Time — 25 Minutes

Put the Macaroni into boiling water seasoned with salt, and boil for about twenty minutes, or until quite soft, but not broken. When it is boiling, skin and cut the kidneys in half, put them into a frying-pan with the butter, and toss them over the fire for two or three minutes. Sprinkle with parsley, pepper, and salt, pour over the stock or water.

Bring it to the boil, then cover down by the side of the fire for five minutes. Place carefully in the centre of a hot dish, boil up the gravy and pour over. Arrange the macaroni round the dish as a border, and serve hot.

Stewed Steak and Walnuts

2 lbs. Steak — 5d.

1/2 pint Water or Stock

3 Pickled Walnuts

1 teaspoonful Vinegar

1 teaspoonful Cornflour

Salt and Pepper

Total Cost — 6d. — 1d.

Time — Three Hours

Cut the steak into neat pieces, put it into hot water and bring to the boil, then keep it below boiling point, but simmering very gently for two hours and a half. Mix the cornflour with a tablespoonful of the vinegar from the walnuts and stir it in, add salt to taste and a small pinch of pepper. Cut up three walnuts and put them in, bring to simmering point again, and cook for at least another half-hour, then dish neatly. Boil up the gravy and pour over it.

Steak and Macaroni

2 lbs. Steak — 5d.

2 oz. Macaroni — 1 1/2d.

1 oz. Dripping

1/2 pint Stock

1 Onion

1 doz. Peppercorns

Salt — 1/2d.

Total Cost — 7d.

Time — Three Hours

Cut the steak into neat pieces, put the butter or dripping into a saucepan and fry the steak quickly; take it out, shred the onion and put it in with the peppercorns, and let it get quite brown. Pour over the stock and stir until it boils, then put back the steak and let it simmer very gently for three hours. While it is cooking, boil the macaroni in weak stock or water for twenty-five minutes, and if it is ready before it is wanted keep it in hot water. When the steak is done, dish it neatly, flavour the gravy, boil it up and pour over. Cut the macaroni into short pieces and place it round the dish as a garnish.

Mutton Chops in Batter

2 Eggs — 2d.

2 lbs. Chops — 5.

1 pint Milk — 2 1/2d.

3/4 lb. Flour

Salt and Pepper — 1/2d.

Total Cost — 10d.

Time — One Hour and a Quarter

Break the eggs into a basin, beat in the flour with a fork, then add gradually the milk, season with a little pepper and salt. Rub some dripping on a baking dish, pour in the batter, lay in the chops. Put into a moderate oven and bake for about one hour and a quarter. Serve hot.

Tomato Pie

3 or 4 Tomatoes — 2d.

1 lb. Chops — 2 1/2d.

1 oz. Butter — 1d.

4 Cold Potatoes — 1d.

Pepper and Salt

1 tablespoonful Milk — 1/2d.

Total Cost — 7d.

Time — One Hour and a Quarter

Skin and slice up the tomatoes, put a layer at the bottom of a pie-dish, then lay in the chops. Season with pepper and salt, and cover with the rest of the tomatoes; mash up the potatoes until ver smooth. Warm the butter and milk and pour it over them and make into a paste. Cover the dish with this crust, brush the top over with a little milk, put into the oven and bake for about one hour and a quarter.

Kabobs

1 1/2 lbs. of Steak — 4d.

1 dessertspoonful Curry Powder

1 dessertspoonful Worcester Sauce

1 dessertspoonful Vinegar — 1 1/2d.

1/2 pint Stock

1 tablespoonful Flour

1 tablespoonful Chutney

1/4 lb. Rice

Salt — 2d.

Total Cost — 71/2 d.

Time — One Hour and a Half

Slice up the steak into pieces about three inches long and two broad. Mix the curry powder, sauce, vinegar, flour and chutney together and spread this over the steak; roll up and thread a small wooden skewers. These skewers should be made from a very small splint of wood, just large enough to hold one or at most two of the rolls; lay them in a saucepan, pour over the stock, bring to the boil and simmer one hour and a half. While they are cooking, well wash the rice in cold water and let it soak for half an hour, throw it into boiling water for three minutes and strain off. Put a pinch of saffron in some fresh water, season with salt, and finish cooking in this. Strain off and dry in the saucepan. Pile this on a dish and lay the kabobs over it; boil up the gravy, season and flavour, and strain round the dish.

Scotch Collops

1 lb. Lean Steak — 2 1/2d.

1 gill Stock

Pepper and Salt

1 oz. Butter — 1d.

Quarter of an Onion

Small Sippets of Toast — 1d.

Total Cost — 41/2 d.

Time — One Hour

Remove all the fat, and cut the meat into very thin and small dice, mince up the onion very finely. Mix together, season with some pepper and salt, and put into a saucepan with the butter. Stir it about for five minutes, then pour on the stock, bring to the boil, and simmer for one hour. Arrange neatly on a hot dish, and put the sippets of toast round.

Poor Man’s Dish

1/2 pint Poor Man’s Sauce — 1/2d.

Slice of Toast

Slices of Cold Meat — 2d.

Total Cost — 21/2 d.

Time — Half an Hour

Make the sauce by directions given elsewhere, pour it into a pie dish, lay in some slices of underdone beef or mutton; cover over and stand in the oven for a quarter of an hour. Cut the slice of toast into sippets, lay them round, and serve.

Breast of Mutton and Peas

2 Breasts of Mutton — 4d.

2 Onions

1 Carrot — 1/2d.

1 Egg — 1d.

Bread Crumbs — 1/2d.

1 fagot of Herbs

1 pint Peas

Salt and Pepper

Hot Fat

12 Peppercorns — 7d.

Total Cost — 1s. 1d.

Time — Two Hours

Wipe the meat with a warm damp cloth, and put it into a saucepan with the vegetables; bring to the boil and stew very gently for two hours. Take it up and remove all the bones, put it between two boards and stand some heavy weights on it till quite cold. Then cut into neat-shaped pieces, egg and bread crumb them; fry a good colour. Boil the peas by recipe given elsewhere. Pile the mutton on a dish and put the peas round. A breast of lamb is exceedingly nice done in this way; it may be cut off before the quarter is roasted. The liquor in which the meat was cooked makes excellent soup.

Tripe and Tomatoes

2 lbs. Tripe — 5d.

1 doz. Tomatoes — 3d.

1/2 pint Water or Stock

1 oz. Cornflour — 1/2d.

1 Onion

Pepper and Salt — 1/2d.

Total Cost — 9d

Time — Four Hours

Cut the tripe into neat pieces, put it on in cold water and bring to the boil; let it boil for five minutes, put it into cold water, and wash and scrape it well. Slice up the tomatoes and rub them through a sieve; mix them with the stock or water, and season with pepper and salt. Pour this into a saucepan, slice in the onion, put in the tripe, and let it boil up. Simmer gently for four hours, mix the cornflour smoothly with a little water or stock, and pour it in; stir until it boils, dish the tripe carefully, season and flavour the sauce to taste, and pour it over. Tripe is more easily digested than any other animal food, and is therefore good for people suffering with dyspepsia.

Tripe in Milk

2 lbs. Tripe — 5d.

1 pint Milk — 2d.

Pepper and Salt

2 Onions

1 oz. Flour

1/2 pint Water — 1/2d.

Total Cost — 71/2 d.

Time — Four Hours

Prepare the tripe as in the preceding recipe. Mix the milk and water together, pour it into a saucepan; lay in the tripe, slice in the onions, bring to the boil, and let it simmer slowly for four hours. Season with pepper and salt, thicken with the flour; after adding the flour let it cook for fifteen minutes, then dish the tripe carefully and pour the sauce over it.

Tomatoes and Mince

8 Tomatoes — 3d.

8 pieces Toast

1/4 lb. Minced Meat

Parsley — 1d.

Total Cost — 4d.

Time — 10 Minutes.

Take any remains of cold mince or hash, add more flavouring if necessary, and make it hot in the saucepan. Wipe the tomatoes and scrape out the centre, fill it up with the mince, and stand in the oven for ten minutes. Have ready some rounds of toast about the same size as the tomatoes. When the tomatoes are cooked enough, stand them on the toast, and serve.

Breakfast Meat

1 lb. Cold Meat — 3d.

2 oz. Macaroni — 1 1/2d.

Pepper and Salt

3 Tomatoes

1/2 gill Stock

Bread Crumbs — 1d.

Total Cost — 51/2 d.

Time — Half an Hour

Mince up the meat, or any remains of cold hash or mince will do. If there is any cold macaroni it can be used; if not, boil some by directions given, and slice up the tomatoes. Butter a dish in which it can be cooked and served. Place at the bottom a layer of meat, then one of macaroni, then one of tomatoes, season with pepper and salt, and continue this in layers until all the materials are used up. Sprinkle a few bread crumbs on the top, put into the oven, and bake for half an hour. Serve hot.

Rissoles

2 lb. Cold Meat — 3d.

1 oz. Butter — 1d.

1 1/2 oz. Flour

1 Egg

Bread Crumbs

1/2 pint Stock

Quarter of an Onion

Parsley

Pepper and Salt

Hot Fat — 2d.

Total Cost — 6d.

Time — 5 Minutes.

Mince up the meat and mix in some chopped parsley, pepper and salt; put the butter into a stewpan, and when it is dissolved mince up the pieces of onion very finely and fry that for two minutes, then stir in the flour. Pour in the gravy and stir until it boils; mix in the meat and let it get thoroughly hot. Turn it out on to a plate, spread it over, and leave until quite cold. Make up into balls, cover with egg and bread crumbs, and fry in hot fat; arrange in a circle and garnish with fried parsley.

Kidney Fritters

6 Kidneys — 6d.

1 teaspoonful Minced Herbs — 1/2d.

Hot Fat

1 teaspoonful Onion

Frying Batter

Pepper and Salt — 1d.

Total Cost — 71/2 d.

Time — 5 Minutes

Skin the kidneys and cut up each one into three or four slices. Make a frying batter by directions given elsewhere; stir in the minced onions and herbs, and season with pepper and salt. Dip the slices of kidney into this and plunge into very hot fat. Fry a good colour, pile high on a dish, garnish with fried parsley, and serve very hot. Slices of cold beef or mutton are very nice done in this way.

Kidney Toast

2 Kidneys — 1 1/2d.

1/2 oz. Butter — 1/2d.

1 Slice Toast

Parsley

Pepper and Salt — 1/2d.

Total Cost — 21/2 d.

Time — 5 Minutes.

Skin and chop the kidneys small, put into a saucepan with the butter, and cook for two or three minutes; season with pepper and salt. Spread it on the toast, sprinkle over some chopped parsley, and serve.

Beef Trifles

1 lb. Cold Roast Beef — 3d.

4 oz. Bread Crumbs

Pepper and Salt — 1d.

1 teaspoonful Onion

1 Egg

1 teaspoonful Parsley or Horse-radish — 1 1/2d.

Total Cost — 51/2 d

Time — Half and Hour

Mince the beef and onion very finely, and mix it with the bread crumbs, pepper, and salt. Add either some chopped parsley or finely scraped horse-radish; mix thoroughly. Moisten with an egg well beaten, and if very dry a spoonful of gravy or milk. Butter some small cups or moulds, fill them with this mixture, and bake for about half an hour. Garnish with sprigs of parsley, and serve with them some horse-radish sauce or brown gravy.

Hashed Beef and Tomato Sauce

1 lb. Cold Roast Beef — 3d.

8 tomatoes — 3d.

1 fagot of Herbs

Salt and Pepper — 1/2d.

1 gill Gravy

1 oz. Butter

1/2 teaspoonful Sugar

Toast — 1 1/2d.

Total Cost — 8d.

Time — Half an Hour

Slice up the tomatoes and put them into a saucepan with the butter, herbs, pepper, salt, sugar, and gravy. Stir about until it becomes quite a pulp; then rub through a sieve, season to taste, and let it get quite cold. Cut the beef into thin slices and lay it in a saucepan, pour over the cold sauce and let it get hot through, very slowly. Arrange on a hot dish, and garnish with fried sippets of bread or toast.

Stewed Chops

1 lb. Chops — 2 1/2d.

1 oz. Butter — 1d.

Pepper and Salt

1/2 oz. Flour

1 gill Gravy — 1/2d.

Total Cost — 4d.

Time — One Hour

Trim some of the fat from the chops, put the butter into a saucepan, and when it is melted stir in the flour. Mix well, and pour in the gravy; stir until it boils, lay in the chops, and simmer very gently for one hour. Dish the chops in a circle, boil up and season the gravy, and pour over the stew.

Baked Chop

1 Chop

Pepper and Salt

Total Cost — 1d

Time — One Hour

Choose a nice loin chop with an undercut. Rub a little butter in a soup plate, lay in the chop, cover with another plate, and stand in a cool oven for an hour. Put on a very hot plate and pour over the gravy which has run from it. Serve very hot.

Rice Cutlets

1/2 lb. Cold Meat — 1 1/2d.

2 oz. Rice

Pepper and Salt — 1/2d.

1 Egg — 1d.

Bread Crumbs

Hot Fat — 1/2d.

Total Cost — 31/2 d.

Time — 5 Minutes

Mince the meat finely; if there is any cold rice in the larder it will do; if not, boil some. Mix the rice and meat well together, season and flavour with a little nutmeg or lemon peel; if the meat is very lean add 2 oz fat or beef suet. Shape into cutlets, egg and bread crumb them, and fry in hot fat; dish in a circle and garnish with fried parsley.

Potato Sausages

3 Cold Potatoes — 1/2d.

1/4 lb. Cold Meat — 1d.

Nutmeg, Pepper, and Salt

1 Egg

Bread Crumbs

Hot Fat — 1 1/2d.

Total Cost — 3d.

Time — 5 Minutes.

Mash up the potatoes, and mince the meat; mix together,

season nicely, and mix into a paste with half the egg. Roll into sausages, egg and bread crumb, and fry in hot fat. Dish in a pyramid, and garnish with fried parsley.

Brazilian Stew

2 lbs. Leg of Beef — 5d.

1 Onion

1 Carrot

1 tablespoonful Vinegar

1 doz. Peppercorns — 1/2d.

Total Cost — 51/2 d.

Time — Three Hours

Cut the beef up in small pieces, dip them in the vinegar, and lay in a jar. Slice in the vegetables, add the peppercorns, and tie a paper over the top of the jar. Stand in a saucepan of boiling water for three hours; dish up the meat, garnish with the carrot, strain the gravy, season and flavour, boil up and pour over. Serve hot.

Beef Olives

2 lbs. Rump Steak — 10d.

1/4 lb. Veal Seasoning — 2d.

12 Peppercorns

1/2 pint Stock

1 Onion

1 Carrot — 1/2d.

Total Cost — 1s. O1/2 d.

Time — One Hour and a Quarter

Cut up the steak into thin slices about three inches long and two broad, shape the seasoning into small corks, roll a piece up in each slice of steak, thread them on a skewer and lay them in a saucepan. Pour in the stock, add the peppercorns and vegetables, bring to the boil, simmer very gently for one hour and a half. Place the olives on a hot dish and draw out the skewers, remove the fat, boil up the gravy, season and flavour to taste, and pour round. Serve hot.

Macaroni Pudding

3 oz. Macaroni — 2d.

1/2 lb. Cold Meat — 2d.

Pepper and Salt

1/2 pint Gravy

2 Eggs

1/2 pint Milk

1 teaspoonful Parsley — 3d.

Total Cost — 7d.

Time — One Hour

Boil the macaroni in stock or water. Mince the meat finely, and season with parsley, pepper, and salt. Rub a pudding basin or mould with butter, put the macaroni and meat in in layers, and season nicely. Beat up the eggs and milk and pour them over, cover with buttered paper, and steam for one hour. Turn out of the basin carefully, and pour round it a little nice brown gravy or white sauce.

Sheep’s Tongues in Tomato Sauce

6 Tongues — 1s.

1/2 pint Tomato Sauce — 2 1/2d.

1 doz. Peppercorns

1 Onion

1 fagot Herbs

1 Carrot — 1d.

Total Cost — 1s. 31/2 d.

Time — Three Hours.

Wash the tongues in cold water, put them into a saucepan, cover them with cold water or stock, and bring to the boil, then skim well. Either corned or fresh tongues will do for this dish. If corned, no salt is required; but if fresh ones are used, put in a dessertspoonful of salt. Put in the vegetables and peppercorns and simmer gently for two hours, then take them up, plunge them into cold water and remove the skin. Trim them off and cut in half. Make some tomato sauce by recipe given elsewhere. The liquor in which the tongues were boiled may be used for this if it is not too salt. Lay the tongues in and simmer for another hour; dish carefully, boil up the sauce and pour over. Garnish with chopped parsley.

Brown Mince

1 lb. Cold Roast Beef — 4d.

1/2 lb. Bread Crumbs — 1d.

Pepper and Salt

1 Egg

1/2 pint Gravy

Nutmeg — 1d.

Total Cost — 6d.

Time — One Hour

Mince up the beef finely and mix it with the bread crumbs; season with pepper, salt, nutmeg, or parsley. Beat up the egg, mix it with the gravy, and pour over the meat and crumbs. Butter a basin, sprinkle well with brown bread crumbs, put in the mince. Cover over with a plate and bake for an hour, then turn on to a hot dish and pour a little nice gravy round it.

Steak a La Jardiniere

1 lbs. Steak — 5d.

1 gill Green Peas — 2d.

1 gill French Beans — 1d.

1/2 oz. Flour

1 oz. Butter

1 Carrot

1 Turnip

1/2 pint Gravy

Salt — 1 1/2d.

Total Cost — 91/2 d.

Time — Three Hours

Cut the steak into neat pieces and fry very quickly in the butter; take it out, put in the flour, and when quite smooth pour on the gravy and stir until it boils. Put back the steak, and simmer very gently for three hours. Cut the carrot and turnip up into thin strips, and put them in when the steak has been cooking for two hours. Boil the peas and beans separately, and add them to the stew five minutes before serving. Arrange the steak on a hot dish, put the vegetables round, and pour over the gravy. The greater the variety of vegetables used the nicer this dish will be.

Kromskies

1/2 lb. Cold Meat — 2d.

2 Rashers Fat Bacon — 2d.

1 oz. Butter — 1d.

Frying Butter — 1d.

1/2 gill Stock

1 oz. Flour

Parsley, Pepper, and Salt

Hot Fat — 1/2d.

Total Cost — 61/2 d.

Time — 5 Minutes

Mince the meat finely or put it through the sausage machine, season with parsley, pepper, and salt; put the butter into a saucepan, and when it is melted stir in the flour and the stock. Stir until it boils, then add the meat and mix thoroughly. Turn on to a plate to cool. When cold make up into pieces about the size of a cork. Take some very thin rashers of fat bacon and cut into strips about half an inch wide by two inches long. Roll the meat in this, dip in frying batter, and fry in very hot fat; drain for a few minutes on kitchen paper, pile high on a dish, garnish with fried parsley, and serve very hot.

Kottbullar

2 lbs. Fillet or Beef — 10d.

1/2 lb. Suet — 1d.

Salt and Pepper

Hot Fat

1/2 pint Milk — 1d.

2 Eggs — 2d.

Nutmeg

Soda Biscuit

Total Cost — 1s. 21/2 d.

Time — 10 Minutes

Mince the lean of the meat very small with about a quarter of a pound of the suet which surrounds it; season with pepper, salt, and nutmeg. Make a little boiled custard by recipe given elsewhere, pour it over the biscuit, which must be made into fine crumbs, then stir in the meat and let it get quite cold. Roll into small balls with a little flour. Put three ounces of dripping into a frying pan, and when very hot drop in the balls and fry a good colour; drain for a few minutes on kitchen paper, and dish in a circle. Serve hot.

Braised Leg of Mutton

1 Leg of Mutton — 1s. 3d.

1 Rasher of Ham — 2d.

1 fagot of Herbs

20 Peppercorns — 1/2d.

1 1/2 oz. Butter — 1d.

2 Carrots

1 Turnip

1 Onion

1 quart Stock — 1d.

Total Cost — 1s. 71/2 d.

Time — Four Hours.

Put the butter into a saucepan, and when it is dissolved put in the mutton and brown it all over; then lay the ham and vegetables round it, pour in the stock, and bring it to the boil. Cover down closely, and stand the saucepan in a moderate oven where it will cook slowly. If the braising is being done by a coal fire the lid of the stewpan may be reversed and some hot coals placed in it; these will want renewing f rom time to time. In any case cook very slowly, then dish the meat, strain the gravy, remove the fat carefully, and boil to a sort of half glaze; pour round the dish, serve with Julienne or plain vegetables.

Pressed Beef

10 lbs. Thick Brisket of Beef, Corned or Fresh — 1s. 6d.

1 fagot of Herbs

1 stalk Celery — 1/2d.

1 Onion

2 Carrots

1 Turnip

40 Peppercorns — 1 1/2d.

Total Cost — 1s. 8d.

Time — Four Hours

Bind the beef with tapes to keep it a good shape. If it is corned, put it on in cold water; if fresh, in hot stock or water, and bring to the boil, then skim carefully and put in the vegetables and peppercorns. Simmer very gently indeed for four hours, then take it up. Take off the tapes, slip out the bones, and put it into a dish; place a piece of board on the top and some heavy weights and leave till the next day, then turn out and serve with a salad. If fresh meat is used for this dish the liquor may be used for soup, or the bones may be put back when removed from the meat and boiled without the lid very quickly for an hour. Then strain off and stand away till the next day; it should then be in a strong jelly. This may be cut into blocks and put round the meat.

Curried Chops

2 lbs. Chops — 5d.

1/2 oz. Curry Powder — 1d.

1 oz. Butter — 1d.

Lemon Juice

1/4 lb. Rice

1/2 pint Gravy or Water — 1d.

1/2 oz. Flour

1 Apple

1 Onion

Salt — 1d.

Total Cost — 9d.

Time — Three Hours.

Trim some of the fat away from the chops. Put the butter into a stewpan, put in the chops and brown them quickly; take out, chop up the apple and onion, and fry that too. Sprinkle with the curry powder and flour, pour in the stock or water and stir until it boils, then put back the chops, bring to the boil, and simmer very gently for three hours. Dish carefully, boil up the gravy, and if it is not thick enough boil quickly without the lid for some minutes. Season with salt and lemon juice and pour over the chops. Boil the rice by directions given elsewhere; rinse out a small mould or cup in cold water, press the rice into it, and turn out. Serve this in a separate dish, but send it to the table with the curry.

Beef a La Mode

6 lbs. Leg of Beef or Silverside — 9d.

1 Calf’s Foot — 4d.

2 Onions

2 Carrots

1 Turnip — 1d.

1 fagot of Herbs

40 Peppercorns

1 blade of Mace

6 Cloves

Salt — 1d.

Total Cost — 1s. 3d.

Time — Five Hours.

Have the foot well chopped up, put it on in cold water, bring it to the boil. Let it boil for five minutes, then take it up and scrape and wash it well, lay it in a stewpan with the beef cut into pieces. Cover with cold water and bring to the boil, put in the spices tied in a piece of muslin, and let it simmer very gently for three hours.

Slice up the vegetables and put them in, and continue simmering altogether for about five hours. Take up the foot, take out all the bones, and cut into pieces; put back the meat of the foot into the saucepan, take out the spices, season with salt, remove the fat, boil up, and serve. This dish is always better for being made the day before it is wanted, as the fat can be more easily removed.

Beefsteak Rolls

1 lb. Of Beefsteak — 2d.

Bread and Butter — 1d.

2 Cloves

1 Onion

Stalk of Celery — 1/2d.

1/2 pint Gravy

1 oz. Butter

1/2 oz. Flour

Salt — 1d.

Total Cost — 41/2 d.

Time — Two Hours

Take a thick steak and split it open, cut it into strips five inches wide by three long. Cut some very thin bread and butter the same size seasoned with pepper and salt, lay it on the steak and roll it up, thread on a skewer and dust with flour. Put the butter into a frying-pan, and when it is hot put in the rolls and fry them quickly; take out and lay in a saucepan, cut up the onion and fry in the same butter as the rolls were fried in. Shake in a teaspoonful of flour and pour in the gravy; stir until it boils, then pour over the rolls. Put in the celery and cloves, and simmer very gently for two hours; take up the rolls on a hot dish and slip off the skewers, boil up and flavour the gravy. Remove the fat and pour round the meat. Veal or mutton is also very good prepared in this way.

Beefsteak Stuffed

1 1/2 lbs. Of Beefsteak — 4d.

1/2 lb. Potatoes

2 oz. Dripping

Salt and Pepper — 1d.

1 oz. Butter

1 tablespoonful Milk

1 Onion

1/2 teaspoonful Sage — 1 1/2d.

Total Cost — 61/2 d.

Time — One Hour

Boil and mash the potatoes with the butter, milk, and salt (if there are any cold ones they will do as well); lay the steak flat and spread the potatoes over it. Chop the onion very fine and powder the sage, and sprinkle over the potatoes; roll up and tie with a tape or string. Rub some dripping over a baking sheet, put in the steak, and plenty of dripping on the top. Put into a moderate oven and bake for an hour, basting frequently. Put on to a hot dish, take off the tapes, and pour round it some nice gravy. Send mashed potatoes to table with it.

Fricassee of Liver

Half a Calf’s Liver — 3d.

1 1/2 oz. Butter — 1 1/2d.

1 Carrot

Lemon Juice — 1/2d.

1 Onion

1 oz. Flour

1 pint of Gravy

Parsley

Pepper and Salt — 1d.

Total Cost — 6d.

Time — One Hour

Wash and slice up the liver, and dip in the flour; fry very lightly and quickly in the butter and lay in a saucepan. Slice up the carrot and fry in the same butter. Stir in the gravy, boil up, and pour over the liver; simmer very gently for one hour, then dish carefully. Season the gravy with salt, pepper, and lemon juice; boil up and pour over it. Serve hot.

Stewed Sweetbreads

1 pair Sweetbreads — 4d.

1 pint Gravy

Salt and Pepper

1/2 Onion — 1/2d.

1 oz. Butter

1/2 oz. Flour

1 Carrot — 1d.

Total Cost — 51/2 d.

Time — One Hour.

Put the sweetbreads in cold water, bring to the boil, strain away the water, scrape and clean them and remove the pieces of skin. Put the butter into a stewpan and flour the sweetbreads; dry very lightly and quickly, take them out. Slice up and fry the onion and carrot, stir in the flour and gravy, and bring to the boil. Lay in the sweetbreads and simmer very gently for one hour; take them up on a hot dish, season and flavour the gravy, remove the fat, boil up and pour round them. Serve hot. Sweetbreads are very nice served with tomato sauce.

Roulades of Beef

1/2 lb. Fillet of Beef — 9d.

1/2 lb. Cold Boiled Bacon — 4d.

1 Egg — 1d.

1 1/2 oz. Dripping

1/2 pint Gravy

Pepper and Mustard

2 oz. Crumbs — 1d.

Total Cost — 1s. 3d.

Time — 10 Minutes

Trim away the fat from the fillet and cut it into very small thin slices, and cut the bacon also into thin slices, but smaller. Spread the side of the beef with mustard and pepper, cover with bacon, and roll up as lightly as possible. When all are rolled beat up an egg, mix it with a spoonful of water, brush over the rolls; cover them with crumbs and thread on a small skewer. Put the dripping into a frying-pan, and when quite hot lay in the rolls and fry until a good colour. Place on a hot dish and slip out the skewers. Make the gravy hot, season and flavour, and pour boiling round the roulades. Should there be any brown sauce in the larder it is nicer than gravy.

Veal Shape

2 lbs. Neck of Veal — 8d.

1 Lemon

Pepper and Salt — 1/2d.

1/4 lb. Ham or Bacon — 2d.

3 Eggs

1/2 pint Stock — 3d.

Total Cost — 1s. 11/2 d.

Time — Three Hours

Put the meat into a saucepan with the rind of the lemon cut very thinly, pour in the stock and simmer very gently for three hours; if the bacon is not cooked put it in and stew it for the last half-hour, then take up the meat and ham, cut it off the bones, and put these back in the saucepan and let them boil quickly without the lid. Boil the eggs hard and cut them in slices and arrange in a plain mould or dish, then lay in the veal and ham, and season with pepper and salt. Strain and flavour the gravy, add the lemon juice, and pour it over the meat. Set aside until quite cold, then turn out. This is a very nice breakfast or luncheon dish.

Swiss Pates

Cold Roast Veal, Fowl, or Lamb — 6d.

Half a Stale Loaf — 1 1/2d.

Sweet Herbs or Parsley — 1d.

1 Egg — 1d.

1 gill Melted Butter

Pepper and Salt

Hot Fat — 1d.

Total Cost — 101/2 d.

Time — 5 Minutes.

Mince the meat very finely, season with any forcemeat that may be left, or else some grated lemon peel, parsley and sweet herbs, pepper and salt. Make one gill of melted butter by recipe given elsewhere, stir in the meat and let it simmer for a few minutes; cut some slices of bread about an inch and a half thick, stamp them out with a round cutter about two inches across. Remove the centre for about half way through with a smaller cutter, brush them over with a raw egg beaten up, and cover them with fine crumbs. Fry in hot fat till a good colour, drain away the fat from them on kitchen paper. Fill these with the mince, garnish with sprigs of parsley, and serve.

Devilled Meat

1 teaspoonful Mustard

1 teaspoonful Worcester Sauce

2 teaspoonful Vinegar

1/2 oz. Butter

1 teaspoonful Oil

1 teaspoonful Lemon Juice

1/2 teaspoonful Curry Powder — 2 1/2d.

Mashed Potatoes

1/2 gill Gravy

Slices of Cold Meat — 1d.

Total Cost — 31/2 d.

Time — 10 Minutes

Put the mustard, made with vinegar instead of water, into a basin; add gradually the oil and butter, curry powder, sauce, vinegar, and lemon juice, and mix very thoroughly, then pour in the gravy. Cut some slices of underdone meat and lay them in a pie dish, pour over the mixture, cover with a plate, and stand in a hot oven for ten minutes; stir frequently. Serve with mashed potatoes.

Jugged Rabbits

2 Rabbits — 1s.

1/2 lb. Pickled Pork — 3d.

1 Onion

1 fagot of Herbs — 1/2d.

1 pint Gravy

1/2 oz. Flour

1 tablespoonful Red Currant Jelly — 1d.

Total Cost — 1s. 41/2 d.

Time — Two Hours

Wash and joint up the rabbits and cut the pork into slices; lay some of the pork over the bottom of a baking jar, and on this some joints of rabbit; continue in layers until all the meat is in, then put in the onion, sliced up, the fagot of herbs, and a few peppercorns. Cover down closely, stand in a moderate oven, and cook for two hours. Take up the meat and arrange nicely on a hot dish, strain the gravy into a saucepan, thicken with the flour, and when it boils stir in the jelly. Flavour to taste, pour it over the rabbits, and serve.

Breakfast Dish of Beef

Slices of Cold Roast Beef (underdone)— 4d.

1/2 gill Melted Butter Sauce — 1/2d.

1/2 gill Gravy or Water

Salt and Pepper

1 tablespoonful Walnut Ketchup or Vinegar — 1/2d.

1 tablespoonful Red Currant Jelly — 1d.

Total Cost — 6d.

Time — Half an Hour

Cut some thin slices of beef and lay them in a saucepan or basin, mix the melted butter sauce, gravy, jelly, and ketchup together, and pour over them. Cover down closely and stand the saucepan in a larger one, half full of boiling water, and steam for half an hour. Put the meat into a dish and pour the sauce over it.

Soubise Cutlets

1 lbs. Neck Chops — 5d.

1 1/2 oz. Butter — 1 1/2d.

1 oz. Flour

3 Onions

1 gill Milk

Pepper, Salt, and Lemon Juice — 1d.

Total Cost — 71/2 d.

Time — 20 Minutes

Trim off the cutlets, lay them in a tin dish, cover with buttered paper, and bake in the oven from fifteen to twenty minutes, according to thickness, turning once while cooking. Peel the onions, put them into cold water, bring to the boil, throw away the water. Put them on again in cold water and boil until rather soft, then strain all the water away, put in the butter, let it get quite hot, then cover down and finish cooking the onions in this, but do not brown them. Stir in the flour and pour over the milk, stir until it boils, let it boil two or three minutes, then rub through a sieve; season with salt, pepper, and lemon juice. Dish the cutlets in a circle, pour away some of the fat, and rinse the tin with a spoonful of gravy. Pour this round the dish and put the soubise sauce in the centre. Serve hot.

Roman Ragout

1 1/2 lbs. Gravy Beef — 4d.

2 oz. Fat Bacon — 1 1/2d.

2 oz. Onion — 1/2d.

1 pint Milk

3 Tomatoes

1/2 pint Gravy

1 1/2 oz. Semolina

1 oz. Dry Cheese — 6d.

Total Cost — 1s.

Time — Three Hours

Mince the onion and bacon very fine indeed, put them into a saucepan and fry a good brown, then add half the gravy, and stir until a sort of half glaze. Rub the tomatoes through a sieve and stir them in with the rest of the gravy, bring to the boil. Cut the meat into strips and put it in with a little salt and pepper, and simmer very gently for about three hours. While it is cooking put the milk on to boil, mix the semolina with a little cold milk, and stir it in; cook it until the spoon will come out quite clean, then turn it on to a dish till cold. Cut it into squares and lay some in a deep dish, sprinkle with grated cheese, then more semolina and more cheese. Pour over this some of the gravy in which the meat is cooking, and put it in the oven to get hot. Dish up the meat and pour the sauce over it. Send the two dishes to table together, quite hot.

Mutton or Ham Bone and Potatoes

1 Bone of Mutton or Ham

1 Onion

1 oz. Butter

1 oz. Flour

1/2 pint Water or Stock — 1 1/2d.

1 lb. Potatoes — 1d.

Total Cost — 21/2 d.

Time — One Hour.

Put the butter into a saucepan, and when it is hot put in the flour; mix together smoothly, pour in the water of stock, and stir until it boils. Joint up a mutton or ham bone and lay it in; if it is mutton, add a little salt. Bring it to the boil, put in the onion whole stuck with two cloves, and simmer for half an hour or longer; then peel the potatoes, cut them in half and put them in, and cook until they are soft. Take out the bones and place on a dish, put the potatoes round, and pour the sauce over. This is a very homely dish, but a very savoury and economical one. A little meat goes a long way, and it is nourishing, too, as all the goodness of the bone and potatoes is in the stew.

Veal in White Sauce

2 lbs. Neck of Veal — 10d.

2 oz. Butter — 1 1/2d.

1 oz. Flour

Salt and Pepper

1 Egg — 1d.

3/4 pint Milk — 2d.

1 Onion

1 fagot of Herbs

1 dozen Peppercorns

Lemon Juice — 1d.

Total Cost — 1s. 31/2 d.

Time — One Hour and a Half.

Put the butter into a saucepan, and when it is melted stir in the flour and cook well, but do not brown. Boil the onion, herbs, and peppercorns in the milk, strain them out, pour the milk over the butter and flour, and stir till it boils. Cut the meat into cutlets, lay them in and simmer very gently till the meat is tender, then take it up and arrange nicely on a dish. Beat up an egg with a drop or two of lemon juice and a spoonful of gravy or milk. Pour into the sauce in which the meat was cooked, and stir briskly over the fire until it thickens; strain over the meat, and serve.

A few very small fat rashers of bacon rolled up and fried are a great improvement to this dish.

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Last updated Friday, March 7, 2014 at 23:09