The Art of Living in Australia, by Philip E. Muskett

Chapter XVII.

Fifty Recipes for Soups.

Stock from Bones (Fresh Bones).

Bones — 3d.

Vegetables — 1d.

Total Cost — 4d.

Beef bones are the best for this stock; break them up very small with a chopper, put them into a large saucepan and cover well with cold water, add two teaspoonsful of salt, and when it boils up remove the scum carefully, and put in one onion, one carrot, half a turnip, a little piece of the outside stalk of celery, and one dozen peppercorns. Boil steadily for six hours, or longer, then strain off through a colander or sieve, and stand in a cool place till the next day. Carefully remove the fat by directions given elsewhere, and it is ready for use.

This stock is a good foundation for all soups, gravies, and sauces. In very hot weather omit all the vegetables.

Stock from Bones (No. 2)

The bones from all joints of meat, whether roasted or boiled, make excellent stock. Beef bones are the best, but very good stock can be made from mutton and veal bones. The bones and trimmings of all kinds of poultry, game, and rabbits are also excellent, particularly for soups that require a special flavour. To make this stock successfully care must be taken to remove all pieces that may be burnt, as these give the stock an unpleasant flavour. The bones must be chopped very small, and well covered with cold water. When the pot boils put in a teaspoonful of salt and skim well, then boil steadily for six hours or longer; strain off and remove the fat, and it is ready for use, but it is much better to let it stand till the next day before converting it into soup or gravy.

Fish Stock

Vegetables and Peppercorns — 1d.

Fish for nearly all dishes is better if boned before cooking; it is also economy to do this, as the bones can then be used for stock for fish soups. These soups, although not well known here at present, are a valuable food; they are easy to make, wholesome, and nourishing. After the fillets of fish have been removed, directions for which are given amongst the fish recipes, take the bones, wash them well in cold water, and cut away any black substance that may be adhering to them. Break them up and put into a saucepan with a teaspoonful of salt; when it boils remove the scum and put in one dozen white peppercorns, a fagot of herbs, one onion, and one carrot; boil steadily for two hours or longer, strain through a sieve into a basin, and it is ready for use.

Pot Boilings

Water in which meat of fish has been boiled should never be thrown away, as it forms an excellent foundation for many soups and sauces which might otherwise have to be made with water.

If a large quantity of water has been used, the boilings will be poor; therefore, when the meat has been taken up, leave the pot on the fire and let it boil quickly, without the lid, for an hour or so, then strain off for use.

The water in which corned beef or pork has been cooked is generally too salt for soups, but it should be stood away till cold, when a thick cake of fat will be found on the top. Put this into a basin and pour over it some boiling water; when it is cold again it can be used for cakes and pastry. It makes an excellent and wholesome substitute for butter in cooking.

Veal Stock

Knuckle of Veal

Peppercorns and Vegetables

Total Cost — 10d.

The butcher should chop the bones very small. Cut the meat across in several places, lay it in a very clean stock pot, cover well with cold water, and bring to the boil slowly; put in a dessertspoonful of salt, and skim very carefully; draw away from the fire, place it where it will boil steadily, put in 2 dozen white peppercorns, one onion stuck with six cloves, and a fagot of herbs. This is made with a sprig each of parsley, marjoram, and thyme, tied up with a bay or peach leaf; boil steadily for six hours, and strain off.

This is the foundation for the best white soups and sauces; it is also a very nutritious broth for invalids. The meat can be made hot again in about half a pint of the stock and served with parsley butter sauce. A recipe for this is given with the sauces.

Beef Stock

Leg of Beef — 9d.

Vegetables — 1d.

Total Cost — 10d.

The bone in this meat should be chopped small by the butcher. Remove the marrow from the bones, and cut the meat into small pieces; put all together into a stock pot or digester, cover well with cold water, and bring it to the boil; add a dessertspoonful of salt; this will throw up the scum, which must be carefully removed. When this has been done put in 2 dozen peppercorns, an onion, and two carrots, draw away from the fire and let it boil steadily for five or six hours or longer, then strain off through a colander and stand away in a cool place.

This is the foundation for nearly all good brown soups. The bones boiled again will make second stock, and the meat does very well for brawn, a recipe for which is given amongst the meat dishes.

Beef Tea — No. 1

1 lb. Gravy Beef

1 pint water

3d.

Remove all fat and skin from the meat and put it twice through a sausage machine or scrape it into a pulp with a sharp knife, pour over the cold water, and let it stand for an hour. Pour it into a brown baking jar and put it into a cool oven, and keep it below boiling point for an hour or longer, according to the heat of the oven. It should look brown, thick, and rich, when sufficiently cooked. Strain through a colander, add salt to taste, and it is ready to serve.

Quick Beef Tea — No. 2

1 lb Gravy Beef

1 pint water

3d.

Pass the meat twice through a sausage machine, put it into a saucepan, pour over the cold water, and stand on the stove; stir constantly until it comes to boiling point, but do not allow it to boil. As soon as it changes colour from red to brown strain through a colander, add salt to taste, and it is ready to serve.

Raw Beef Tea.

1/4 lb Gravy Beef and 1 gill of Water

Scrape the meat to a pulp with a sharp knife, pour over it with water; cover over and stand away for an hour. Strain off, and it is ready. As this is given to an invalid in small quantities, very little should be made at a time.

Beef Essence.

1 lb Gravy Beef — 3d.

Mince the meat very small, put it into a brown baking jar, and cover down with a closely-fitting lid or with brown paper. Stand in a saucepan of boiling water for one hour, pour off the essence, add a little salt, and it is ready.

Mutton Broth

4 or 5 scrags of Mutton and Shank Bones — 6d

Carefully trim the scrags of mutton, remove the pith from the bones, and wipe with a damp cloth; break these and the shank bones into very small pieces; put them into an enamelled saucepan, well covered with cold water; add a teaspoonful of salt, stand on the stove, and when it boils up remove the scum very carefully. Add 1 dozen peppercorns, and an onion and carrot, if vegetables are allowed the patient. Boil steadily for eight or nine hours; the liquor should then be reduced to one quart. Strain off, and, if possible, let it stand till quite cold; it should then be in a jelly, and can be made hot as required. When serving this to a convalescent a spoonful of rice or pearl barley well washed in cold water and boiled in either stock or milk may be added.

Cock-A-Leekie Soup

9 Leeks — 3d.

1 set of Giblets

2 oz. Beef Dripping

3 quarts Water or Pot Boilings

Salt and Peppercorns — 4d.

Total Cost — 7d.

Wash and slice up the leeks into pieces about one inch long, put them into a saucepan with the butter or dripping made thoroughly hot; cover over and let them cook for half an hour, stirring occasionally. While they are cooking clean the giblets thoroughly, washing them first in hot and then in cold water. Cut open the gizzard, remove the stones, and cleanse well. Cut them all up into small pieces and put them into the saucepan with the leeks, pour over the boiling water or liquor, put in the peppercorns tied in a piece of muslin, and a piece of bacon rind if there is any in the larder. Let it simmer slowly for three hours; if not brown enough add a few drops of caramel, take out the peppercorns and bacon rind, season to taste, pour into a hot tureen and serve.

Cabbage and Bacon Soup

1 Cabbage — 3d.

1 lb. Bacon — 9d.

1 doz. Peppercorns

2 Turnips

1 Carrot

1 Onion

Pieces of Stale Bread — 1d.

Total Cost — 1s. 1d.

Time — Three Hours and a Half

This soup is not as expensive as it appears, for the bacon is served as a dish of meat, either after the soup or cold for breakfast or tea. Put two quarts of water into a saucepan; when it boils put in a pound of bacon neither too lean nor too fat. Let it boil slowly for one hour. The bacon must be well washed and scraped before cooking, and when it boils skim the pot thoroughly. Well wash the cabbage and soak it in hot water for half an hour. Take all the water away and put the cabbage into the saucepan with the bacon and vegetables cut up, and the peppercorns tied in a piece of muslin; let them simmer together for two and a half hours, take up the cabbage, and cut it into quarters. Take one quarter and cut it into small pieces and put it into a soup tureen. Cut some stale pieces of bread into thin slices and lay on the top, pour over the boiling liquor, and serve. Dish the bacon, pull off the rind, and put the rest of the cabbage round the dish.

Italian Soup

2 oz. Macaroni — 1 1/2d.

2 quarts Water or Pot Boilings

2 Tomatoes

1 oz. Butter

2 oz. Cheese Rind — 1 1/2d.

Total Cost — 3 d.

Time — Half an Hour.

Put the water or stock on to boil, and when it boils put in the macaroni and boil from twenty-five to thirty minutes. While it is boiling grate up a dry piece of cheese. Put the tomatoes into boiling water and remove the skin, slice them up and put them into a saucepan with the butter and some pepper and salt, and cook them for a few minutes. When the macaroni is soft, cut it into pieces one inch long, put a layer of tomatoes at the bottom of the soup tureen, then a layer of grated cheese, then one of macaroni; repeat this until all the materials are used up, pour over it boiling the liquor in which the macaroni has been cooked, cover down for a few minutes, and serve.

Pot-Au-Feu

3 lbs. Leg of Beef — 6d.

2 quarts Water

1 fagot of Herbs

Salt and Pepper

2 Onions

2 Carrots

2 Turnips

1 doz. Peppercorns — 1 1/2d.

Total Cost — 7 1/2 d.

Time — Five Hours

Pot-au-feu is the national dish of France; it is cheap, nourishing and palatable, and very simple to make. The slower it is cooked the better it is; in fact, in this lies the whole secret of success, for if it boils instead of simmering it is spoilt. Tie the meat up into a nice shape with a piece of tape, put it into cold water, bring slowly to the boil, and very carefully remove the scum; peel and slice up the vegetables, and put them in with the fagot of herbs and the peppercorns tied in a piece of muslin; bring to simmering point, and keep it so for five hours. The liquor can then be served as a soup with part of the vegetables and some sippets of toast. Take the tapes off the meat, and serve with the rest of the vegetables round the dish as a border or garnish. The remains of the beef can be pressed between heavy weights till cold, or put into a brawn tin and served cold with a salad.

Vermicelli Soup

1 oz. Vermicelli — 1d.

Vegetables and Saffron

2 quarts Bone Stock — 1d.

Total Cost — 2 d.

Time — One Hour

The stock for this soup should be good and in a strong jelly when cold. Put it into a saucepan with three or four threads of saffron, an onion or leek stuck with six cloves, 1 dozen white peppercorns and some salt, and boil all together for half an hour; then strain out the vegetables and put it back into the saucepan. It should be of a bright straw colour; if it is not, a thread more saffron may be added before straining. Put in the vermicelli broken small, and simmer for twenty minutes; it is then ready to serve.

Mulligatawny Soup

2 quarts Stock

1 Apple

1 Onion

1 Carrot — 1d.

1/2 oz. Curry Powder

1 oz. Flour — 1d.

1 oz. Butter — 1d.

Total Cost — 3d.

Time — One Hour

The liquor in which poultry or a rabbit has been boiled is the best for this soup. Slice up the apple, onion, and carrot, and fry them in the butter; sprinkle over the curry powder and flour and brown that too; pour over the boiling stock and stir until it boils up, simmer gently for one hour, then rub through a sieve and return to the saucepan. Bring to the boil, flavour with salt and lemon juice. Pour into a warm tureen and serve. Send well-boiled rice to the table with this soup.

French Soup

3 Potatoes

3 Carrots

2 Turnips — 1 1/2d.

2 quarts Bone Stock

Pepper

2 Onions

1/2 stalk Celery — 1d.

1 oz. Butter — 1d.

1 teaspoonful Sugar

Salt — 1/2d.

Total Cost — 4d.

Time — One Hour.

Peel and slice up the vegetables and sprinkle them with the sugar and salt, and put them into a saucepan with the butter, and sweat for five minutes. Pour over the boiling stock and stir until it boils; boil slowly for an hour, then rub through a sieve. If it is too thick, reduce it with a little more stock or milk, return to a saucepan, and bring to the boil. When tomatoes are in season slice up two with the other vegetables; these will make the soup a good colour and improve the flavour.

Sago Soup

3 oz. Sago — 1d.

1 pint Milk — 2 1/2d.

2 quarts Bone Stock

1 Leek

Salt and Pepper — 1/2d.

Total Cost — 4d.

Time — Half an Hour.

Wash the sago in cold water, boil the leek in the stock for ten minutes, take it out and stir in the sago; continue stirring until the sago is transparent and the stock quite thick, then pour in the milk and bring up to the boil. Season with salt and pepper, and serve.

Celery Soup

2 heads of Celery — 2d.

2 quarts Pot Boilings

1 pint of Milk — 2 1/2d.

1 oz. Sago — 1/2d.

Total Cost — 5d.

Time — One Hour

If vegetables have been boiled with the meat the stock will be sufficiently flavoured; if not, boil an onion and carrot in it and strain out. Wash the celery thoroughly and cut it into pieces one inch long, put it into the boiling stock and boil for half an hour, then sprinkle in 1 oz of sago and stir until it is transparent. Pour in the milk and bring to boiling point; it is then ready to serve. This is an excellent soup for any one suffering from or subject to rheumatism or gout.

Turnip and Rice Soup

4 Turnips — 2d.

1/4 lb. Rice — 1d.

2 quarts Water

1 pint Milk — 2 1/2d.

Onion and Salt — 1/2d.

Total Cost — 6d.

Time — One Hour and a Quarter

Peel and slice up the turnips, wash the rice and put into a saucepan with the onion and 1 dozen white peppercorns. Pour over the water and boil for an hour, rub through a sieve and return to the saucepan, with the milk and a seasoning of salt and pepper; stir until it boils, then pour into a warm tureen and sprinkle some chopped parsley on top. This soup is much improved by putting one ounce of butter into the water in which the rice and turnips are boiled.

Tapioca Soup

2 oz. Tapioca — 1d.

1 Onion

1 Carrot

3 quarts Bone Stock — 1/2d.

Boil the onion and carrot in the stock for twenty minutes. If the stock is not a good colour put in half a teaspoonful of burnt sugar. Strain out the vegetables, wash the tapioca in cold water and stir it in; continue stirring until the tapioca is quite clear, flavour with salt and lemon juice, and serve very hot. This soup should be quite transparent and of a bright brown colour.

Water Souchet

6 Small Fish — 1s.6d.

Vegetables

Salt and Pepper

Lemon Juice — 1d.

Total Cost — 1s. 7d.

Time — One Hour and a Half.

Choose small fish of different kinds and fillet them. As only half the fillets are wanted for the souchet, the rest may be dressed in another way. Wash the bones in cold water and remove the black substance from them, put them into two quarts of cold water with a teaspoonful of salt, and when it boils remove the scum and add 1 dozen peppercorns, one carrot, one small turnip, one onion, a small piece of celery, and a fagot of herbs. Put the vegetables in whole. Boil this together for one hour, then strain off through a hair sieve and return to the saucepan; wash the vegetables that have been boiled in it, slice them up and put them into the liquor. Cut the fillets of fish into small pieces and put them in; simmer for half an hour, then put in a little lemon juice, pour into a tureen, and sprinkle a little chopped parsley on the top. Send brown bread and butter to table with it and a lemon.

Oyster Soup

1 bottle Oysters — 1s.

1 pint of Milk — 2 1/2d.

Cornflour and Vegetables

2 quarts Fish Stock — 1d.

Total Cost — 1 s. 3 1/2 d.

Time — One Hour.

If there is no fish stock, use pot boilings. As this is a white soup a special saucepan must be used. Put the stock and the liquor from the bottle of oysters into this stewpan with an onion stuck with six cloves, 2 dozen white peppercorns, and a fagot of herbs, and boil together for half an hour, then strain off and return to the saucepan with the milk. When nearly boiling thicken with a tablespoonful of cornflour and boil two or three minutes; put in the oysters and simmer for five minutes. Flavour with a little lemon juice, nutmeg, and salt. Pour into a warm tureen, and send fried bread to table with it.

Brown Macaroni Soup

1 1/2 oz. Macaroni — 1 1/2d.

1 oz. Butter — 1d.

Vegetables — 1d.

Cornflour

2 quarts Bone Stock — 1/2d.

Total Cost — 4d.

Time — One Hour and a Quarter.

Slice up the onions or leeks, one carrot, and make a fagot of herbs; fry them in the butter with 1 dozen peppercorns till they are quite brown, but not burnt. Sprinkle over a tablespoonful of cornflour, and when brown pour over the boiling stock and stir till it boils up; let it simmer for an hour. If it is not brown enough, burn a little sugar in a spoon and stir it in. If half a teaspoonful of sugar is sprinkled over the vegetables when they are frying they will brown much quicker. When the vegetables are soft rub the soup through a wire sieve and return to the saucepan. Boil the macaroni in salt and water for twenty minutes, strain off, and cut into pieces one inch long; put these into the soup and simmer for a quarter of an hour. Flavour with a little salt and pepper if necessary, and pour into a hot tureen.

Haricot Bean Soup

1 lb. Haricot Beans — 4d.

2 Onions

1/2 pint of Milk

2 quarts Bone Stock — 1 1/2d.

Total Cost — 5 1/2 d.

Time — Four Hours

Soak the haricot beans for an hour or two, then put them into a saucepan with the stock or water, the onions, and 1 dozen white peppercorns; boil for four hours and then rub through a sieve, return to the saucepan with the milk and seasoning of pepper and salt, stir until it boils. It is then ready to serve. An ounce of butter stirred in just before it is finished is a great improvement.

This is one of the most nourishing soups that can be made. It is an excellent food for outdoor workers. When butter is dear, sweat the haricots in 1 oz. of beef dripping.

Milk Soup

2 lbs. Potatoes — 2d.

1 oz. Butter — 1d.

1 Onion

1/2 pint of Milk

3 pints of Water — 1 1/2d.

Total Cost — 4 1/2 d.

Time — Half an Hour

Peel, wash, and slice up the potatoes and onions and put them into a saucepan with the butter, and stir them about till all the butter is dissolved and worked into the potatoes, but they must not get brown. Pour over the boiling water and boil until they are of a pulp, then rub them through a sieve, return to the saucepan, add the milk and seasoning, and stir till it boils. Pour into a hot tureen, and serve with fried bread.

Onion Soup

4 Onions — 1d.

1 oz. Butter — 1d.

1 1/2 oz. Flour

1 gill of Milk

2 quarts of Stock

Salt and Pepper — 1d.

Total Cost — 3d.

Time — One Hour.

Peel and slice up the onions and fry them in the butter till they are a good brown colour. Sprinkle over the flour and brown that too. Pour on the boiling stock and boil steadily till the onions are very soft, then rub through a sieve. If there is any fat on it remove it carefully, pour back into the saucepan, add the milk, pepper, and salt, and boil up.

Just before serving put in a few drops of lemon juice. Send fried bread to table with it.

Pumpkin Soup

1 small Pumpkin — 4d.

2 oz. Butter — 2d.

1/2 pint of Milk — 1d.

2 Onions, 1 Carrot

2 quarts of Water — 1d.

Total Cost — 8d.

Time — One Hour and a Half.

Peel and slice up the pumpkin, onions, and carrot, put them into a saucepan with half the butter, and sweat the vegetables in it for five minutes, then pour over the boiling water and boil until the vegetables are very soft. Rub through a sieve and return to the saucepan with the milk and some pepper and salt; stir until it boils up.

Just before serving, stir in, in tiny pieces, the rest of the butter and a little lemon juice.

Vegetable Soup

2 lbs. Mixed Vegetables — 4d.

2 oz. Butter — 2d.

1/4 lb Haricot Beans — 1d.

Peppercorns, Salt, and Sugar

4 quarts of Water — 1/2d.

Total Cost — 7 1/2 d.

Time — One Hour and a Half.

Take any vegetables that may be in season, such as carrots, turnips, leeks, onions, and celery, and slice them up; put them into a saucepan with the haricot beans and the butter, and turn them all about till the butter is all absorbed; sprinkle over them a teaspoonful each of salt and sugar, add the peppercorns and the water, and boil until the vegetables are very soft.

Rub them through a sieve, return to the saucepan and make thoroughly hot, and it is ready to serve.

Semolina Soup

2 oz. Semolina — 2d.

1/2 pint of Milk

3 pints Bone Stock

Salt and Pepper — 1d.

Total Cost — 3d.

Time — One Hour.

If the stock has been made without vegetables, as it must often be in hot weather, boil an onion, carrot, fagot of herbs, and a dozen peppercorns in it for half an hour, then strain the stock and put it back in the saucepan. Sprinkle in the semolina and stir until it boils; simmer till the semolina thickens, then add the milk, pepper, and salt, and boil up. Pour into a warm tureen, and send fried bread to table with it.

Carrot Soup

6 Carrots — 2d.

1 oz. Butter — 1d.

Sugar, Salt, and Pepper

3 quarts Bone Stock — 1/2d.

Total Cost — 3 1/2 d.

Time — One Hour.

Scrape and slice up the carrots and put them into a saucepan with the butter. Sprinkle over a teaspoonful each of salt and sugar and a quarter of a teaspoonful of pepper; turn them about in butter for five minutes, pour over the boiling stock and boil for an our. Rub through a sieve, return to the saucepan and boil up, season to taste, and serve very hot.

Tomato Soup

1 doz. Tomatoes — 4d.

1 oz. Butter — 1d.

2 Onions, 1 Carrot

2 oz. Flour

Salt and 1 teaspoonful Sugar

2 doz. Peppercorns

3 quarts Bone Stock — 1 1/2d.

Total Cost — 6 1/2 d.

Time — One Hour.

Slice up the onions and carrot, and fry them in the butter with the peppercorns and sugar. Sprinkle over the flour and mix well together. Cut up the tomatoes and put them in, then pour over the boiling stock and stir until it boils. Simmer slowly for an hour. Rub through a sieve, return to the saucepan and make thoroughly hot, pour into a warm tureen, and serve with fried bread.

Jersey Soup

2 quarts White Stock — 6d.

1 pint Milk — 2 1/2d.

1 oz. Sage

1 Leek

1 Fagot of Herbs

1 doz. White Peppercorn

Salt — 1 1/2d.

Total Cost — 10d.

Time — One Hour.

Put the stock into a stewpan; slice in the leek and add the fagot of herbs and the peppercorns. Boil them together for half an hour, strain out the vegetables and return to the saucepan; stir in the sage and continue stirring until it is clear and the soup is thick; pour in the boiling milk, boil up and pour into a tureen. Sprinkle finely chopped parsley on the top before serving.

Scotch Broth

2 quarts of the Liquor in which Mutton has been cooked

Salt

1 oz. Rice

1 Carrot

1/2 Turnip, and Stalk of Celery

Total Cost — 1 1/2 d.

Time — One Hour.

Carefully remove all the fat from the liquor; put it into a saucepan. Wash the rice and cut all the vegetables into dice; stir them in, and simmer by the side of the fire for an hour. It must be cooked very slowly and without the lid. Add salt to taste, and pour it into a tureen. Pearl barley may be used instead of rice.

Lentil Soup

1 lb. Split Lentils — 2d.

1/2 oz. Butter — 1d.

3 Onions and 2 doz. Peppercorns

1 teaspoonful Sugar

3 quarts Water

Salt — 1d.

Total Cost — 4 d.

Time — Four Hours.

Wash the lentils well in two or three waters and put them into a saucepan with the onions, peppercorns, sugar, salt, and half the butter, and sweat them for five minutes. Pour over the boiling water and boil steadily for four hours. If the soup gets too thick, pour in a little more water or stock. Rub through a sieve and return to the saucepan; stir in the butter, salt, and pepper to taste. Boil up and serve.

Lentil soup is one of the most nourishing of all soups, and particularly nice during the winter months.

Pea Soup

1 lb. Split Peas — 3d.

2 Onions and 1/4 Head of Celery — 1d.

1 oz. Butter or Dripping — 1d.

2 Carrots

2 doz. Peppercorns

3 quarts Water — 1d.

Total Cost — 6d.

Time — Four Hours.

Wash the peas well in cold water, and put them into a saucepan with the vegetables sliced up, the peppercorns and the water. Bring to the boil and boil steadily for four hours, then rub through a sieve and return to the saucepan. Season well with salt, and stir in 1 oz butter or dripping. Bring to the boil and pour into a warm tureen. Send some dried mint and fried bread to table with it. This is a very nourishing soup, particularly if it is made with stock instead of water; it is very suitable for the cold season.

Vegetable Marrow and Tomato Soup

1 doz. Tomatoes — 3d.

1 Vegetable Marrow — 2d.

9 Onions

1 oz. Butter

2 doz. Peppercorns

1 teaspoonful Sugar

3 pints Stock

Salt — 2d.

Total Cost — 7d.

Time — One Hour.

Peel the vegetable marrow, slice it up, and take out the seeds; slice up the tomatoes and put them, with the marrow, into the saucepan with the butter, sugar, salt, and peppercorns; sweat them for five minutes. Pour over the boiling water or stock, and simmer for one hour. Rub through a sieve and return to the saucepan. Add more salt, if necessary, bring it to the boil, pour into a tureen, and serve.

Kidney Soup

1 Ox Kidney — 4d.

2 Onions — 1/2d.

1 oz. Butter — 1d.

1 oz. Cornflour — 1/2d.

Salt, Lemon Juice, and parsley

2 quarts Stock — 1/2d.

Total Cost — 6 1/2 d.

Time — One Hour.

Slice up the onions and fry them in the butter, strain them out and return the butter to the saucepan. Stir in the cornflour, and when well mixed pour over the stock and stir until it boils. Slice the kidney up into small pieces, and put it in; simmer very gently for one hour. Just before serving, season with salt and a little lemon juice; pour into a tureen and sprinkle a little chopped parsley on top.

This soup must be cooked very slowly, or the kidney will be hard and tough.

Egg Soup

1 quart White Stock

1 pint of Milk — 2 1/2d.

3 Yolks of Eggs — 3d.

1 oz. Sago — 1/2d.

1 Onion — 1/2d.

Salt and Pepper — 1/2d.

Total Cost — 7d.

Time — Half an Hour

Boil the sago, stock, and onion together till the sago is clear; then take out the onion and season the soup with salt and pepper.

Beat the yolks of the eggs in a basin, pour over the boiling milk, strain into the stock. Put over the fire and whisk till it comes to boiling point, but do not let it boil, or it may curdle. Pour into a tureen, sprinkle with chopped parsley, and send some fried bread to table with it.

White Macaroni Soup

1 1/2 oz. Macaroni — 1d.

1 pint Milk — 2 1/2d.

1 oz. Butter — 1d.

3 pints Bone Stock

Vegetables and Flour — 1d.

Total Cost — 5 1/2 d.

Time — One Hour.

The stock made from veal or mutton bones is the best for this soup, as it must be white. Nothing is nicer than the liquor in which a piece of veal has been stewed. If plenty of vegetables have been boiled in it none need be added when the soup is made. If not, boil an onion or leek, a slice of turnip, and a small piece of celery stalk in the stock for twenty minuets, and strain them out. Put the butter into a stewpan, and when it is melted stir in a tablespoonful of cornflour, pour over the milk and stock, and stir until it boils. Boil the macaroni in salt and water for twenty minutes, strain off the water, and cut it into pieces about 1 inch long; put these into the soup, and simmer for ten minutes. Just before serving, flavour with salt, a dust of white pepper, and a few drops of lemon juice.

Lobster Soup

1 Lobster, Crayfish, or Tin of Lobster — 1s.

2 quarts Fish Stock

1/2 pint of Milk — 1d.

1 oz. Cornflour — 1/2d.

Lemon Juice, Salt, and Pepper — 1/2d.

Total Cost — 1s. 2d.

Time — One Hour

The fish stock for this soup should be well flavoured with vegetables. If a crayfish be used, remove all the white meat and boil the shells in the stock for half an hour and strain them out; thicken with the cornflour, pour in the milk, and boil up. Cut the lobster into small pieces and put into the soup; simmer for ten minutes. Flavour with lemon juice and salt, pour into a warm tureen, and serve with fried bread. Wash the shells well in cold water before putting them into the soup.

Fish Soup

3 pints Fish Stock

1 pint Milk — 2 1/2d.

Cornflour — 1/2d.

Vegetables — 1d.

Fish — 6d.

Total Cost — 10d.

Time — Half an Hour

Remove all the fat from the fish stock and put it into a saucepan with six white peppercorns, an onion, one slice of turnip, a fagot of herbs, and some carrot. Boil this together for twenty minutes, then strain out the vegetables and pour back into the saucepan. Mix a tablespoonful of cornflour smoothly with the milk and stir it in; continue stirring till it boils. Skin and fillet the fish and cut it into dice, put these pieces of fish into the soup, and simmer for ten minutes. Just before serving add a few drops of lemon juice, and salt to taste. Pour into a tureen and sprinkle a little chopped parsley on top.

Cabbage Soup

1 Cabbage — 3d.

2 oz. Butter — 1 1/2d.

1 pint Milk

Pepper, Salt, and Bread — 3d.

Total Cost — 7 1/2 d.

Time — One Hour

Wash and strain the cabbage well, and cut it up into slices; throw it into boiling salt and water, and cook for five minutes; strain all the water off and put it into a saucepan with the salt, pepper, and two quarts of boiling water, and boil for one hour. Add the milk and let it boil up again, toast the slice of bread and cut it up into dice. Put it into a warm soup tureen and pour the boiling soup over it.

Sydney Soup

1/2 doz. Tomatoes — 2d.

1 Carrot

2 Small Onions

12 Peppercorns

1 fagot Herbs

1/2 teaspoon Salt

2 quarts Stock — 1 1/2d.

1 oz. Butter — 1d.

1 oz. Cornflour and 1/2 oz. Tapioca — 1d.

1 cup of Green Peas — 2d.

Curry Powder

1/2 teaspoonful of Sugar — 1/2d.

Total Cost — 8d.

Time — One Hour.

Put the butter into a saucepan, slice up the onions and carrot and fry them in it with the herbs, peppercorns, and a good pinch of curry powder. Mix the cornflour with a little stock and pour it over. Slice up the tomatoes and add them to the boiling stock; stir until it boils, and then simmer slowly for an hour. Rub through a sieve and return to the saucepan. Add the salt, sugar, and the tapioca; stir until this becomes transparent and thickens the soup. Put in a cupful of cold boiled peas; boil up and serve.

White Onion Soup

(SOUBISE BLANCHE.)

1 pint of Milk — 2d.

1 oz. Butter — 1d.

4 Onions

Salt and Pepper

1 pint White Bone Stock

Dry Crusts — 1d.

Total Cost — 4d.

Time — One Hour.

Peel and slice up the onions and put them into a saucepan with the butter; make them very hot, and then cover them down and leave them to cook by the side of the fire for an hour, but they must not get any colour. Break in some dry, hard pieces of bread; it should be crust only for this soup. Boil the milk and stock together, pour it over the onions and bread, and let it simmer very slowly, closely covered, for an hour; rub through a sieve, season with salt and pepper and a few drops of lemon juice. Boil up and serve with fried bread.

Crecy Soup

6 Carrots — 2d.

2 oz. Butter — 2d.

1 Onion

1/2 teaspoonful Sugar

1/2 teaspoonful Salt

1 Turnip

1 stalk of Celery

3 pints of Boiling Water — 1/2d.

Total Cost — 4 1/2 d.

Time — Two Hours.

Slice up the carrots and vegetables, put them into boiling water, and cook for half-an-hour; strain them out of the water, which must be saved, and put them into a saucepan with the butter and a few scraps of bacon, if any are in the larder. Sprinkle over the sugar, make very hot, and cover down closely until the vegetables are very soft. Rub them through a sieve and pour on by degrees the water in which the vegetables were boiled; mix well together, return to a saucepan, and boil slowly for an hour. Stir in a small piece of butter and it is ready to serve. This soup should be perfectly smooth if properly made. A hair sieve should be used for the vegetables, and the soup should be cooked very slowly.

Lenten Soup

6 Onions — 1 1/2d.

2 oz. Butter or Beef Dripping

2 quarts of Water or Pot Liquor

Crusts of Bread

Salt and Pepper — 2d.

Total Cost, with Butter — 3 1/2 d.

Time — Two Hours.

Peel and slice up the onions and put them into a sauce — pan with the butter or dripping, and brown them. Then let them cook, covered over, for an hour. Break in some brown dry crusts of bread. Pour over the boiling liquor the water in which some vegetables, such as carrots, turnips, or cauliflowers, have been boiled, stir it well and boil for an hour; rub through a sieve. If it is not thick enough, let it boil again without the lid for ten minutes. Season well with pepper and salt, and serve.

Soup Maigre

1/2 lb. Rice — 1d.

2 oz. Butter — 2d.

1 gill Milk — 1/2d.

Salt

2 Eggs

1 Carrot

1 Onion — 2 1/2d.

Total Cost — 6d.

Time — Half an Hour

Wash the rice well in two waters, put into a saucepan with 2 1/2 pints of cold water and the onion and carrot whole. As the rice begins to swell add some more boiling water, until it is about the right consistency. Take out the onion and carrot and stir in the butter, a small piece at a time. Beat the yolks of the eggs in a basin, stir them quickly in, and bring again to boiling point, but do not let it boil; season with salt, and serve at once, with tiny rusks of bread. Make these by cutting up a dry crust into small pieces, dipping them in water, and baking until crisp in a moderate oven.

Artichoke Soup

2 lbs. Artichokes — 3d.

2 Onions — 1/2d.

1 1/2 pints Milk — 4d.

2 quarts Bone Stock (White)

1 tablespoonful Vinegar

1 tablespoonful Lemon Juice

1 doz. White Peppercorns — 1d.

Total Cost — 8 1/2 d

Time — One Hour and a Quarter.

Peel the artichokes and lay them in vinegar and water for an hour; this will make them a good colour. Mix up half a pint of the milk with the stock, and boil the artichokes, onions, and peppercorns in this for an hour. Rub through a hair sieve with a wooden spoon. Stir in the milk and some salt, pour back into the saucepan and stir until it boils. If the artichokes do not thicken the soup sufficiently, sprinkle in a little sago or semolina when it is returned to the saucepan. Serve with fried bread.

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Last updated Friday, March 7, 2014 at 23:09