English Housewifery, by Elizabeth Moxon

English Housewifry.

1. To make Vermicelly Soop.

Take a neck of beef, or any other piece; cut off some slices, and fry them with butter ‘till they are very brown; wash your pan out every time with a little of the gravy; you may broil a few slices of the beef upon a grid-iron: put all together into a pot, with a large onion, a little salt, and a little whole pepper; let it stew ‘till the meat is tender, and skim off the fat in the boiling; them strain it into your dish, and boil four ounces of vermicelly in a little of the gravy ‘till it is soft: Add a little stew’d spinage; then put all together into a dish, with toasts of bread; laying a little vermicelly upon the toast. Garnish your dish with creed rice and boil’d spinage, or carrots slic’d thin.

2. Cucumber Soop.

Take a houghil of beef, break it small and put it into a stew-pan, with part of a neck of mutton, a little whole pepper, an onion, and a little salt; cover it with water, and let it stand in the oven all night, then strain it and take off the fat; pare six or eight middle-siz’d cucumbers, and slice them not very thin, stew them in a little butter and a little whole pepper; take them out of the butter and put ’em in the gravy. Garnish your dish with raspings of bread, and serve it up with toasts of bread or French roll.

3. To make Hare Soop.

Cut the hare into small pieces, wash it and put it into a stew-pan, with a knuckle of veal; put in it a gallon of water, a little salt, and a handful of sweet herbs; let it stew ‘till the gravy be good; fry a little of the hare to brown the soop; you may put in it some crusts of write bread among the meat to thicken the soop; put it into a dish, with a little stew’d spinage, crisp’d bread, and a few forc’d-meat balls. Garnish your dish with boil’d spinage and turnips, cut it in thin square slices.

4. To make Green Pease Soop.

Take a neck of mutton, and a knuckle of veal, make of them a little good gravy; then take half a peck of the greenest young peas, boil and beat them to a pulp in a marble mortar; then put to them a little of the gravy; strain them through a hair sieve to take out all the pulp; put all together, with a little salt and whole pepper; then boil it a little, and if you think the soop not green enough, boil a handful of spinage very tender, rub it through a hair-sieve, and put into the soop with one spoonful of wheat-flour, to keep it from running: You must not let it boil after the spinage is put in, it will discolour it; then cut white bread in little diamonds, fry them in butter while crisp, and put it into a dish, with a few whole peas. Garnish your dish with creed rice, and red beet-root.

You may make asparagus-soop the same way, only add tops of asparagus, instead of whole pease.

5. To make Onion Soop.

Take four or five large onions, pill and boil them in milk and water whilst tender, (shifting them two or three times in the boiling) beat ’em in a marble mortar to a pulp, and rub them thro’ a hair-sieve, and put them into a little sweet gravy; then fry a few slices of veal, and two or three slices of lean bacon; beat them in a marble mortar as small as forc’d-meat; put it into your stew-pan with the gravy and onions, and boil them; mix a spoonful of wheat-flour with a little water, and put it into the soop to keep it from running; strain all through a cullender, season it to your taste; then put into the dish a little spinage stew’d in butter, and a little crisp bread; so serve it up.

6. Common Pease Soop in Winter.

Take a quart of good boiling pease which put into a pot with a gallon of soft water whilst cold; add thereto a little beef or mutton, a little hung beef or bacon, and two or three large onions; boil all together while your soop is thick; salt it to your taste, and thicken it with a little wheat-flour; strain it thro’ a cullender, boil a little sellery, cut it in small pieces, with a little crisp bread, and crisp a little spinage, as you would do parsley, then put it in a dish, and serve it up. Garnish your dish with raspings of bread.

7. To make Pease Soop in Lent.

Take a quart of pease, put them into a pot with a gallon of water, two or three large onions, half a dozen anchovies, a little whole pepper and salt; boil all together whilst your soop is thick; strain it into a stew-pan through a cullender, and put six ounces of butter (work’d in flour) into the soop to thicken it; also put in a little boil’d sellery, stew’d spinage, crisp bread, and a little dry’d mint powdered; so serve it up.

8. Craw-Fish Soop.

Take a knuckle of veal, and part of a neck of mutton to make white gravy, putting in an onion, a little whole pepper and salt to your taste; then take twenty crawfish, boil and beat them in a marble mortar, adding thereto alittlee of the gravy; strain them and put them into the gravy; also two or three pieces of white bread to thicken the soop; boil twelve or fourteen of the smallest craw-fish, and put them whole into the dish, with a few toasts, or French roll, which you please; so serve it up.

You may make lobster soop the same way, only add into the soop the seeds of the lobster.

9. To make Scotch Soop.

Take a houghil of beef, cut it in pieces, with part of a neck of mutton, and a pound of French barley; put them all into your pot, with six quarts of water; let it boil ‘till the barley be soft, then put in a fowl; as soon as ’tis enough put in a handful of red beet leaves or brocoli, a handful of the blades of onions, a handful of spinage, washed and shred very small; only let them have a little boil, else it will spoil the greenness. Serve it up with the fowl in a dish, garnish’d with raspings of bread.

10. To make Soop without Water.

Take a small leg of mutton, cut it in slices, season it with a little pepper and salt; cut three middling turnips in round pieces, and three small carrots scrap’d and cut in pieces, a handful of spinage, a little parsley, a bunch of sweet herbs, and two or three cabbage lettice; cut the herbs pretty small, lay a row of meat and a row of herbs; put the turnips and carrots at the bottom of the pot, with an onion, lay at the top half a pound of sweet butter, and close up the pot with coarse paste; them put the pot into boiling water, and let it boil for four hours; or in a slow oven, and let it stand all night; when it is enough drain the gravy from the meat, skim off the fat, then put it into your dish with some toasts of bread, and a little stew’d spinage; to serve it up.

11. To stew a Brisket of Beef.

Take the thin part of a brisket of beef, score the skin at the top; cross and take off the under skin, then take out the bones, season it highly with mace, a little salt, and a little whole pepper, rub it on both sides, let it lay all night, make broth of the bones, skim the fat clean off, put in as much water as will cover it well, let it stew over a slow fire four or five hours, with a bunch of sweet herbs and an onion cut in quarters; turn the beef over every hour, and when you find it tender take it out of the broth and drain it very well, having made a little good strong gravy.

A ragoo with sweet-breads cut into pieces, pullets tenderly boil’d and cut in long pieces; take truffles and morels, if you have any mushrooms, with a little claret, and throw in your beef, let it stew a quarter of an hour in the ragoo, turning it over sometimes, then take out your beef, and thicken your ragoo with a lump of butter and a little flour. Garnish your dish with horse-radish and pickles, lay the ragoo round your beef, and a little upon the top; so serve it up.

12. To stew a Rump of Beef.

Take a fat rump of young beef and cut off the fag end, lard the low part with fat bacon, and stuff the other part with shred parsley; put it into your pan with two or three quarts of water, a quart of Claret, two or three anchovies, an onion, two or three blades of mace, a little whole pepper, and a bunch of sweet herbs; stew it over a slow fire five or six hours, turning it several times in the stewing, and keep it close cover’d; when your beef is enough take from it the gravy, thicken part of it with a lump of butter and flour, and put it upon the dish with the beef. Garnish the dish with horse-radish and red-beet root. There must be no salt upon the beef, only salt the gravy to your taste.

You may stew part of a brisket, or an ox cheek the same way.

13. To make Olives of Beef.

Take some slices of a rump (or any other tender piece) of beef, and beat them with a paste pin, season them with nutmeg, pepper and salt, and rub them over with the yolk of an egg; make a little forc’d-meat of veal, beef-suet, a few bread crumbs, sweet-herbs, a little shred mace, pepper, salt, and two eggs, mixed all together; take two or three slices of the beef, according as they are in bigness, and a lump of forc’d-meat the size of an egg; lay your beef round it, and roll it in part of a kell of veal, put it into an earthen dish, with a little water, a glass of claret, and a little onion shred small; lay upon them a little butter, and bake them in an oven about an hour; when they come out take off the fat, and thicken the gravy with a little butter and flour; six of them is enough for a side dish. Garnish the dish with horseradish and pickles.

You may make olives of veal the same way.

14. To fry Beef-Steaks.

Take your beef steaks and beat them with the back of a knife, fry them in butter over a quick fire, that they may be brown before they be too much done; when they are enough put them into an earthen pot whilst you have fry’d them all; pour out the fat, and put them into your pan with a little gravy, an onion shred very small, a spoonful of catchup and a little salt; thicken it with a little butter and flour, the thickness of cream. Garnish your dish with pickles.

Beef-steaks are proper for a side-dish.

15. Beef-Steaks another Way.

Take your beef-steaks and beat them with the back of a knife, strow them over with a little pepper and salt, lay them on a grid-iron over a clear fire, turning ’em whilst enough; set your dish over a chafing-dish of coals, with a little brown gravy; chop an onion or Shalot as small as pulp, and put it amongst the gravy; (if your steaks be not over much done, gravy will come therefrom;) put it on a dish and shake it all together. Garnish your dish with shalots and pickles.

16. A Shoulder of Mutton forc’d.

Take a pint of oysters and chop them, put in a few bread-crumbs, a little pepper, shred mace, and an onion, mix them all together, and stuff your mutton on both sides, then roast it at a slow fire, and baste it with nothing but butter; put into the dripping-pan a little water, two or three spoonfuls of the pickle of oysters, a glass of claret, an onion shred small, and an anchovy; if your liquor waste before your mutton is enough, put in a little more water; when the meat is enough, take up the gravy, skim off the fat, and thicken it with flour and butter; then serve it up. Garnish your dish with horse-radish and pickles.

17. To stew a Fillet of Mutton.

Take a fillet of mutton, stuff it the same as for a shoulder, half roast it, and put it into a stew pan with a little gravy, a jill of claret, an anchovy, and a shred onion; you may put in a little horse-radish and some mushrooms; stew it over a slow fire while the mutton is enough; take the gravy, skim off the fat, and thicken it with flour and butter; lay forc’d-meat-balls round the mutton. Garnish your dish with horse-radish and mushrooms.

It is proper either for a side-dish or bottom dish; if you have it for a bottom-dish, cut your mutton into two fillets.

18. To Collar a Breast of Mutton.

Take a breast of mutton, bone it, and season it with nutmeg, pepper and salt, rub it over with the yolk of an egg; make a little forc’d-meat of veal or mutton, chop it with a little beef-suet, a few bread-crumbs, sweet herbs, an onion, pepper and salt, a little nutmeg, two eggs, and a spoonful or two of cream; mix all together and lay it over the mutton, roll it up and bind it about with course inkle; put it into an earthen dish with a little water, dridge it over with flour, and lay upon it a little butter; it will require two hours to bake it. When it is enough take up the gravy, skim off the fat, put in an anchovy and a spoonful of catchup, thicken it with flour and butter; take the inkle from the mutton and cut it into three or four rolls; pour the sauce upon the dish, and lay about it forc’d-meat-balls. Garnish your dish with pickles.

19. To Collar a Breast of Mutton another Way.

Take a breast of mutton, bone it, and season it with nutmeg, pepper and salt; roll it up tight with coarse incle and roast it upon a spit; when it is enough lay it whole upon the dish. Then take four or six cucumbers, pare them and cut them in slices, not very thin; likewise cut three or four in quarters length way, stew them in a little brown gravy and a little whole pepper; when they are enough thicken them with flour and butter the thickness of cream; so serve it up. Garnish your dish with horse-radish.

20. To Carbonade a Breast of Mutton.

Take a breast of mutton, half bone it, nick it cross, season it with pepper and salt; then broil it before the fire whilst it be enough, strinkling it over with bread-crumbs; let the sauce be a little gravy and butter, and a few shred capers; put it upon the dish with the mutton. Garnish it with horse-radish and pickles.

This is proper for a side-dish at noon, or a bottom-dish at night.

21. A Chine of Mutton roasted, with stew’d Sellery.

Take a loyn of mutton, cut off the thin part and both ends, take off the skin, and score it in the roasting as you would do pork; then take a little sellery, boil it, and cut it in pieces about an inch long, put to it a little good gravy, while pepper and salt, two or three spoonfuls of cream and a lump of butter, so thicken it up, and pour it upon your dish with your mutton. — This is proper for a side-dish.

22. Mutton-Chops.

Take a leg of mutton half-roasted, when it is cold cut it in thin pieces as you would do any other meat for hashing, put it into a stew-pan with a little water or small gravy, two or three spoonfuls of claret, two or three shalots shred, or onions, and two or three spoonfuls of oyster pickle; thicken it up with a little flour, and so serve it up. Garnish your dish with horse-radish and pickles.

You may do a shoulder of mutton the same way, only boil the blade-bone, and lie in the middle.

23. A forc’d Leg of Mutton.

Take a leg of mutton, loose the skin from the meat, be careful you do not cut the skin as you loosen it; then cut the meat from the bone, and let the bone and skin hang together, chop the meat small, with a little beef-suet, as you would do sausages; season it with nutmeg, pepper and salt, a few bread-crumbs, two or three eggs, a little dry’d sage, shred parsley and lemon-peel; then fill up the skin with forc’d-meat, and lay it upon an earthen dish; lay upon the meat a little flour and butter, and a little water in the dish; it will take an hour and a half baking; when you dish it up lay about it either mutton or veal chollops, with brown gravy sauce. Garnish your dish with horse-radish and lemon. You may make a forc’d leg of lamb the same way.

24. To make French Cutlets of Mutton.

Take a neck of mutton, cut it in joints, cut off the ends of the long bones, then scrape the meat clean off the bones about an inch, take a little of the inpart of the meat of the cutlets, and make it into forc’d-meat; season it with nutmeg, pepper, and salt; then lay it upon your cutlets, rub over them the yolk of an egg to make it stick; chop a few sweet herbs, and put to them a few bread-crumbs, a little pepper and salt, and strew it over the cutlets, and wrap them in double writing-paper; either broil them before the fire or in an oven, half an hour will do them; when you dish them up, take off the out-paper, and set in the midst of the dish a little brown gravy in a china-bason; you may broil them without paper if you please.

25. To fry Mutton Steaks.

Take a loyn of mutton, cut off the thin part, then cut the rest into steaks, and flat them with a bill, season them with a little pepper and salt, fry them in butter over a quick fire; as you fry them put them into a stew-pan or earthen-pot, whilst you have fried them all; then pour the fat out of the pan, put in a little gravy, and the gravy that comes from the steaks, with a spoonful of claret, an anchovy, and an onion or a shalot shred; shake up the steaks in the gravy, and thicken it with a little flour; so serve them up. Garnish your dish with horse radish and shalots.

26. To make artificial Venison of Mutton.

Take a large shoulder of mutton, or a middling fore quarter, bone it, lay it in an earthen dish, put upon it a pint of claret, and let it lie all night; when you put it into your pasty-pan or dish, pour on the claret that it lay in, with a little water and butter; before you put it into your pasty-pan, season it with pepper and salt; when you make the pasty lie no paste in the bottom of the dish.

27. How to brown Ragoo a Breast of Veal.

Take a breast of veal, cut off both the ends, and half roast it; then put it into a stew-pan, with a quart of brown gravy, a spoonful of mushroom-powder, a blade or two of mace, and lemon-peel; so let it stew over a slow fire whilst your veal is enough; then put in two or three shred mushrooms or oysters, two or three spoonfuls of white wine; thicken up your sauce with flour and butter; you may lay round your veal some stew’d morels and truffles; if you have none, some pallets stew’d in gravy, with artichoke-bottoms cut in quarters, dipt in eggs and fry’d, and some forc’d-meat-balls; you may fry the sweet-bread cut in pieces, and lay over the veal, or fry’d oysters; when you fry your oysters you must dip them in egg and flour mixed. Garnish your dish with lemon and pickles.

28. A Herico of a Breast of Veal, French Way.

Take a breast of veal, half roast it, then put it into a stew-pan, with three pints of brown gravy; season your veal with nutmeg, pepper and salt; when your veal is stew’d enough, you may put in a pint of green peas boil’d. Take six middling cucumbers, pare and cut them in quarters long way, also two cabbage-lettices, and stew them in brown gravy; so lay them round your veal when you dish it up, with a few forc’d-meat-balls and some slices of bacon. Garnish your dish with pickles, mushrooms, oysters and lemons.

29. To roll a Breast of Veal.

Take a breast of veal, and bone it, season it with nutmeg, pepper and salt, rub it over with the yolk of an egg, and strew it over with sweet herbs shred small, and some slices of bacon, cut thin to lie upon it, roll it up very tight, bind it with coarse inkle, put it into an earthen dish with a little water, and lay it upon some lumps of butter; strew a little seasoning on the outside of your veal, it will take two hours baking; when it is baked take off the inkle and cut it in four rolls, lay it upon the dish with a good brown gravy-sauce: lay about your veal the sweet-bread fry’d, some forc’d-meat-balls, a little crisp bacon, and a few fry’d oysters if you have any; so serve it up. Garnish your dish with pickles and lemon.

30. A stew’d Breast of Veal.

Take the fattest and whitest breast of veal you can get, cut off both ends and boil them for a little gravy; take the veal and raise up the thin part, make a forc’d-meat of the sweet-bread boil’d, a few bread-crumbs, a little beef-suet, two eggs, pepper and salt, a spoonful or two of cream, and a little nutmeg, mix’d all together; so stuff the veal, skewer the skin close down, dridge it over with flour, tie it up in a cloth, and boil it in milk and water about an hour. For the sauce take a little gravy, about a jill of oysters, a few mushrooms shred, a little lemon shred fine, and a little juice of lemon; so thicken it up with flour and butter; when you dish it up pour the same over it; lay over it a sweet-bread or two cut in slices and fry’d, and fry’d oysters. Garnish your dish with lemon, pickles and mushrooms.

This is proper for a top dish either at noon or night.

31. To stew a Fillet of Veal.

Take a leg of the best whye veal, cut off the dug and the knuckle, cut the rest into two fillets, and take the fat part and cut it in pieces the thickness of your finger; you must stuff the veal with the fat; make the hole with a penknife, draw it thro’ and skewer it round; season it with pepper, salt, nutmeg, and shred parsley; then put it into your stew-pan, with half a pound of butter, (without water) and set it on your stove; let it boil very slow and cover it close up, turning it very often; it will take about two hours in stewing; when it is enough pour the gravy from it, take off the fat, put into the gravy a pint of oysters and a few capers, a little lemon-peel, a spoonful or two of white wine, and a little juice of lemon; thicken it with butter and flour the thickness of cream; lay round it forc’d-meat-balls and oysters fry’d, and so serve it up. Garnish your dish with a few capers and slic’d lemon.

32. To make Scotch Collops.

Take a leg of veal, take off the thick part and cut in thin slices for collops, beat them with a paste-pin ‘till they be very thin; season them with mace, pepper and salt; fry them over a quick fire, not over brown; when they are fried put them into a stew-pan with a little gravy, two or three spoonfuls of white wine, two spoonfuls of oyster-pickle if you have it, and a little lemon-peel; then shake them over a stove in a stew-pan, but don’t let them boil over much, it only hardens your collops; take the fat part of your veal, stuff it with forc’d-meat, and boil it; when it is boiled lay it in the middle of your dish with the collops; lay about your collops slices of crisp bacon, and forc’d-meat-balls. Garnish your dish with slices of lemon and oysters, or mushrooms.

33. To make Veal Cutlets.

Take a neck of veal, cut it in joints, and flatten them with a bill; cut off the ends of the bones, and lard the thick part of the cutlets with four or five bits of bacon; season it with nutmeg, pepper and salt; strew over them a few bread crumbs, and sweet herbs shred fine; first dip the cutlets in egg to make the crumbs stick, then broil them before the fire, put to them a little brown gravy sauce, so serve it up. Garnish your dish with lemon.

34. Veal Cutlets another Way.

Take a neck of veal, cut it in joints, and flat them as before, and cut off the ends of the long bones; season them with a little pepper, salt and nutmeg, broil them on a gridiron, over a slow fire; when they are enough, serve them up with brown gravy sauce and forc’d-meat-balls. Garnish your dish with lemon.

35. Veal Cutlets another Way.

Take a neck of veal and cut it in slices, flatten them as before, and cut off the ends of the long bones; season the cutlets with pepper and salt, and dridge over them some flour; fry them in butter over a quick fire; when they are enough put from them the fat they were fried in, and put to them a little small gravy, a spoonful of catchup, a spoonful of white wine or juice of lemon, and grate in some nutmeg; thicken them with flour and butter, so serve them up. Garnish your dish as before.

36. To Collar a Calf’s Head to eat hot.

Take a large fat head, and lay it in water to take out the blood; boil it whilst the bones will come out; season it with nutmeg, pepper and salt; then wrap it up round with a large lump of forc’d-meat made of veal; after which wrap it up tight in a veal kell before it is cold, and take great care that you don’t let the head break in two pieces; then bind it up with a coarse inkle, lay it upon an earthen dish, dridge it over with flour, and lay over it a little butter, with a little water in the dish; an hour and a half will bake it; when it is enough take off the inkle, cut it in two length ways, laying the skin-side uppermost; when you lay it upon your dish you must lay round it stew’d pallets and artichoke-bottoms fry’d with forc’d-meat-balls; put to it brown gravy-sauce; you may brown your sauce with a few truffles or morels, and lay them about your veal.

Garnish your dish with lemon and pickle.

37. To Collar a Calf’s Head to eat cold.

You must be a calf’s head with the skin on, split it and lay it in water, take out the tongue and eyes, cut off the groin ends, then tie it up in a cloth and boil it whilst the bones come out; when it is enough lay it on a table with the skin-side uppermost, and pour upon it a little cold water; then take off the hair and cut off the ears; mind you do not break the head in two, turn it over and take out the bones; salt it very well and wrap it round in a cloth very tight, pin it with pins, and tie it at both ends, so bind it up with broad inkle, then hang it up by one end, and when it is cold take it out; you must make for it brown pickle, and it will keep half a year; when you cut it, cut it at the neck.

It is proper for a side or middle dish, either for noon or night.

38. To make a Calf’s Head Hash.

Take a calf’s head and boil it, when it is cold take one half of the head and cut off the meat in thin slices, put it into a stew pan with a little brown gravy, put to it a spoonful or two of walnut pickle, a spoonful of catchup, a little claret, a little shred mace, a few capers shred, or a little mango; boil it over a stove, and thicken it with butter and flour; take the other part of the head, cut off the bone ends and score it with a knife, season it with a little pepper and salt, rub it over with the yolk of an egg, and strew over a few bread crumbs, and a little parsley; then set it before the fire to broil whilst it is brown; and when you dish up the other part lay this in the midst; lay about your hash-brain-cakes, forc’d-meat-balls and crisp bacon.

To make Brain-cakes; take a handful of bread-crumbs, a little shred lemon-peel, pepper, salt, nutmeg, sweet-marjorum, parsley shred fine, and the yolks of three eggs; take the brains and skin them, boil and chop them small, so mix them all together; take a little butter in your pan when you fry them, and drop them in as you do fritters, and if they run in your pan put in a handful more of bread-crumbs.

39. To hash a Calf’s Head white.

Take a calf’s head and boil it as much as you would do for eating, when it is cold cut in thin slices, and put it into a stew-pan with a white gravy; then put to it a little shred mace, salt, a pint of oysters, a few shred mushrooms, lemon-peel, three spoonful of white wine, and some juice of lemon, shake all together, and boil it over the stove, thicken it up with a little flour and butter; when you put it on your dish, you must put a boil’d fowl in the midst, and few slices of crisp bacon.

Garnish your dish with pickles and lemon.

40. A Ragoo of a Calf’s Head.

Take two calves’ head and boil them as you do for eating, when they are cold cut off all the lantern part from the flesh in pieces about an inch long, and about the breadth of your little finger; put it into your stew-pan with a little white gravy; twenty oysters cut in two or three pieces, a few shred mushrooms, and a little juice of lemon; season it with shred mace and salt, let them all boil together over a stove; take two or three spoonfuls of cream, the yolks of two or three eggs, and a little shred parsley, then put it into a stew-pan; after you have put the cream in you may shake it all the while; if you let it boil it will crudle, so serve it up.

Garnish your dish with sippets, lemon, and a few pickled mushrooms.

41. To roast a Calf’s Head to eat like Pig.

Take a calf’s head, wash it well, lay it in an earthen dish, and cut out the tongue lay it loose under the head in the dish with the brains, and a little sage and parsley; rub the head over with the yolk of an egg, then strew over them a few bread-crumbs and shred parsley, lay all over it lumps of butter and a little salt, then set it in the oven; it will take about an hour and a half baking; when it is enough take the brains, sage and parsley; and chop them together, put to them the gravy that is in the dish, a little butter and a spoonful of vinegar, so boil it up and put it in cups, and set them round the head upon the dish, take the tongue and blanch it, cut it in two, and lay it on each side the head, and some slices of crisp bacon over the head, so serve it up.

42. Sauce for a Neck of Veal.

Fry your veal, and when fried put in a little water, an anchovy, a few sweet herbs, a little onion, nutmeg, a little lemon-peel shred small, and a little white wine or ale, then shake it up with a little butter and flour, with some cockles and capers.

43. To boil a Leg of Lamb, with the Loyn fry’d about it.

When your lamb is boil’d lay it in the dish, and pour upon it a little parsley, butter and green gooseberries coddled, then lay your fried lamb round it; take some small asparagus and cut it small like peas, and boil it green; when it is boil’d drain it in a cullender, and lay it round your lamb in spoonfuls.

Garnish your dish with gooseberries, and heads of asparagus in lumps.

This is proper for a bottom dish.

44. A Leg of Lamb boil’d with Chickens round it.

When your lamb is boil’d pour over it parsley and butter, with coddled gooseberries, so lay the chickens round your lamb, and pour over the chickens a little white fricassy sauce. Garnish your dish with sippets and lemon.

This is proper for a top dish.

45. A Fricassy of Lamb white.

Take a leg of lamb, half roast it, when it is cold cut it in slices, put it into a stew-pan with a little white gravy, a shalot shred fine, a little nutmeg, salt, and a few shred capers; let it boil over the stove whilst the lamb is enough; to thicken your sauce, take three spoonfuls of cream, the yolks of two eggs, a little shred parsley, and beat them well together, then put it into your stew-pan and shake it whilst it is thick, but don’t let it boil; if this do not make it thick, put in a little flour and butter, so serve it up. Garnish your dish with mushrooms, oysters and lemon.

46. A brown Fricassy of Lamb.

Take a leg of lamb, cut it in thin slices and season it with pepper and salt, then fry it brown with butter, when it is fried put it into your stew-pan, with a little brown gravy, an anchovy, a spoonful or two of white wine or claret, grate in a little nutmeg, and set it over the stove; thicken your sauce with flour and butter. Garnish your dish with mushrooms, oysters and lemon.

47. To make Pig eat like Lamb in Winter.

Take a pig about a month old and dress it, lay it down to the fire, when the skin begins to harden you must take it off by pieces, and when you have taken all the skin off, draw it and when it is cold cut it in quarters and lard it with parsley; then roast it for use.

48. How to stew a Hare.

Take a young hare, wash and wipe it well, cut the legs into two or three pieces, and all the other parts the same bigness, beat them all flat with a paste-pin, season it with nutmeg and salt, then flour it over, and fry it in butter over a quick fire; when you have fried it put into a stew-pan, with about a pint of gravy, two or three spoonfuls of claret and a small anchovy, so shake it up with butter and flour, (you must not let it boil in the stew-pan, for it will make it cut hard) then serve it up. Garnish your dish with crisp parsley.

49. How to Jug a Hare.

Take a young hare, cut her in pieces as you did for stewing, and beat it well, season it with the same seasoning you did before, put it into a pitcher or any other close pot, with half a pound of butter, set it in a pot of boiling water, stop up the pitcher close with a cloth, and lay upon it some weight for fear it should fall on one side; it will take about two hours in stewing; mind your pot be full of water, and keep it boiling all the time; when it is enough take the gravy from it, clear off the fat, and put her into your gravy in a stew-pan, with a spoonful or two of white wine, a little juice of lemon, shred lemon-peel and mace; you must thicken it up as you would a white fricassy.

Garnish your dish with sippets and lemon.

50. To roast a Hare with a pudding in the belly.

When you have wash’d the hare, nick the legs thro’ the joints, and skewer them on both sides, which will keep her from drying in the roasting; when you have skewer’d her, put the pudding into her belly, baste her with nothing but butter: put a little in the dripping pan; you must not baste it with the water at all: when your hare is enough, take the gravy out of the dripping pan, and thicken it up with a little flour and butter for the sauce.

How to make a Pudding for the Hare.

Take the liver, a little beef-suet, sweet-marjoram and parsley shred small, with bread-crumbs and two eggs; season it with nutmeg, pepper and salt to your taste, mix all together and if it be too stiff put in a spoonful or two of cream: You must not boil the liver.

51. To make a brown fricassy of Rabbets.

Take a rabbet, cut the legs in three pieces, and the remainder of the rabbet the same bigness, beat them thin and fry them in butter over a quick fire; when they are fried put them into a stew-pan with a little gravy, a spoonful of catchup, and a little nutmeg; then shake it up with a little flour and butter.

Garnish your dish with crisp parsley.

52. A white fricassy of Rabbets.

Take a couple of young rabbets and half roast them; when they are cold take off the skin, and cut the rabbets in small pieces, (only take the white part) when you have cut it in pieces, put it into a stew-pan with white gravy, a small anchovy, a little onion, shred mace and lemon-peel, set it over a stove, and let it have one boil, then take a little cream, the yolks of two eggs, a lump of butter, a little juice of lemon and shred parsley; put them all together into a stew-pan, and shake them over the fire whilst they be as white as cream; you must not let it boil, if you do it will curdle. Garnish your dish with shred lemon and pickles.

53. How to make pulled Rabbets.

Take two young rabbets, boil them very tender, and take off all the white meat, and pull off the skin, then pull it all in shives, and put it into your stew-pan with a little white gravy, a spoonful of white wine, a little nutmeg and salt to your taste; thicken it up as you would a white fricassy, but put in no parsley; when you serve it up lay the heads in the middle. Garnish your dish with shred lemon and pickles.

54. To dress Rabbets to look like Moor-Game.

Take a young rabbet, when it is cased cut off the wings and the head; leave the neck of your rabbet as long as you can; when you case it you must leave on the feet, pull off the skin, leave on the claws, so double your rabbet and skewer it like a fowl; put a skewer at the bottom through the legs and neck, and tie it with a string, it will prevent its flying open; when you dish it up make the same sauce as you would do for partridges. Three are enough for one dish.

55. To make white Scotch Collops.

Take about four pounds of a fillet of veal, cut it in small pieces as thin as you can, then take a stew-pan, butter it well over, and shake a little flour over it, then lay your meat in piece by piece, whilst all your pan be covered; take two or three blades of mace, and a little nutmeg, set your stew-pan over the fire, toss it up together ‘till all your meat be white, then take half a pint of strong veal broth, which must be ready made, a quarter of a pint of cream, and the yolks of two eggs, mix all these together, put it to your meat, keeping it tossing all the time ‘till they just boil up, then they are enough; the last thing you do squeeze in a little lemon: You may put in oysters, mushrooms, or what you will to make it rich.

56. To boil Ducks with Onion Sauce.

Take two fat ducks, and season them with a little pepper and salt, and skewer them up at both ends, and boil them whilst they are tender; take four or five large onions and boil them in milk and water, change the water two or three times in the boiling, when they are enough chop them very small, and rub them through a hair-sieve with the back of a spoon, ‘till you have rubb’d them quite through, then melt a little butter, put in your onions and a little salt, and pour it upon your ducks. Garnish your dish with onions and sippets.

57. To stew Ducks either wild or tame.

Take two ducks and half-roast them, cut them up as you would do for eating, then put them into a stew-pan with a little brown gravy, a glass of claret, two anchovies, a small onion shred very fine, and a little salt; thicken it up with flour and butter, so serve it up. Garnish you dish with a little raw onion and sippets.

58. To make a white fricassy of Chickens.

Take two or more chickens, half-roast them, cut them up as you would do for eating, and skin them; put them into a stew-pan with a little white gravy, juice of lemon, two anchovies, shred mace and nutmeg, then boil it; take the yolks of three eggs, a little sweet cream and shred parsley, put them into your stew-pan with a lump of butter and a little salt; shake them all the while they are over the stove, and be sure you do not let them boil lest they should curdle.

Garnish your dish with sippets and lemon.

59. How to make a brown fricassy of Chickens.

Take two or more chickens, as you would have your dish in bigness, cut them up as you do for eating, and flat them a little with a paste-pin; fry them a light-brown, and put them into your stew-pan with a little gravy, a spoonful or two of white wine, a little nutmeg and salt; thicken it up with flour and butter. Garnish your dish with sippets and crisp parsley.

60. Chickens Surprise.

Take half a pound of rice, set it over a fire in soft water, when it is half-boiled put in two or three small chickens truss’d, with two or three blades of mace, and a little salt; take a piece of bacon about three inches square, and boil it in water whilst almost enough, then take it out, pare off the outsides, and put it into the chickens and rice to boil a little together; (you must not let the broth be over thick with rice) then take up your chickens, lay them on a dish, pour over them the rice, cut your bacon in thin slices to lay round your chickens, and upon the breast of each a slice.

This is proper for a side-dish.

61. To boil Chickens.

Take four or five small chickens, as you would have your dish in bigness; if they be small ones you may scald them, it will make them whiter; draw them, and take out the breast-bone before you scald them; when you have dress’d them, put them into milk and water, and wash them, truss them, and cut off the heads and necks; if you dress them the night before you use them, dip a cloth in milk and wrap them in it, which will make them white; you must boil them in milk and water, with a little salt; half an hour or less will boil them.

To make Sauce for the CHICKENS.

Take the necks, gizzards and livers, boil them in water, when they are enough strain off the gravy, and put to it a spoonful of oyster-pickle; take the livers, break them small, mix a little gravy, and rub them through a hair-sieve with the back of a spoon, then put to it a spoonful of cream, a little lemon and lemon-peel grated; thicken it up with butter and flour. Let your sauce be no thicker than cream, which pour upon your chickens. Garnish your dish with sippets, mushrooms, and slices of lemon.

They are proper for a side-dish or a top-dish either at noon or night.

62. How to boil a Turkey.

When your turkey is dress’d and drawn, truss her, cut off her feet, take down the breast-bone with a knife, and sew up the skin again; stuff the breast with a white stuffing.

How to make the Stuffing. Take the sweet-bread of veal, boil it, shred it fine, with a little beef-suet, a handful of bread-crumbs, a little lemon-peel, part of the liver, a spoonful or two of cream, with nutmeg, pepper, salt, and two eggs, mix all together, and stuff your turkey with part of the stuffing, (the rest you may either boil or fry to lay round it) dridge it with a little flour, tie it up in a cloth, and boil it with milk and water: If it be a young turkey an hour will boil it.

How to make Sauce for the Turkey. Take a little small white gravy, a pint of oysters, two or three spoonfuls of cream, a little juice of lemon, and salt to your taste, thicken it up with flour and butter, then pour it over your turkey, and serve it up; lay round your turkey fry’d oysters, and the forc’d-meat. Garnish your dish with oysters, mushrooms, and slices of lemon.

63. How to make another Sauce for a Turkey.

Take a little strong white gravy, with some of the whitest sellery you can get, cut it about an inch long, boil it whilst it be tender, and put it into the gravy, with two anchovies, a little lemon-peel shred, two or three spoonfuls of cream, a little shred mace, and a spoonful of white wine; thicken it up with flour and butter; if you dislike the sellery you may put in the liver as you did for chickens.

64. How to roast a Turkey.

Take a turkey, dress and truss it, then take down the breast-bone. To make Stuffing for the Breast. Take beef-suet, the liver shred fine, and bread-crumbs, a little lemon-peel, nutmeg, pepper and salt to your taste, a little shred parsley, a spoonful or two of cream, and two eggs. Put her on a spit and roast her before a slow fire; you may lard your turkey with fat bacon; if the turkey be young, an hour and a quarter will roast it. For the sauce, take a little white gravy, an onion, a few bread-crumbs, and a little whole pepper, let them boil well together, put to them a little flour and a lump of butter, which pour upon the turkey; you may lay round your turkey forc’d-meat-balls.

Garnish your dish with slices of lemon.

65. To make a rich Turkey Pie.

Take a young turkey and bone her, only leave in the thigh bones and short pinions; take a large fowl and bone it, a little shred mace, nutmeg, pepper and salt, and season the turkey and fowl in the inside; lay the fowl in the inside of the low part of the turkey, and stuff the breast with a little white stuffing, (the same white stuffing as you made for the boiled turkey,) take a deep dish, lay a paste over it, and leave no paste in the bottom; lay in the turkey, and lay round it a few forc’d-meat-balls, put in half a pound of butter, and a jill of water, then close up the pie, an hour and a half will bake it; when it comes from the oven take off the lid, put in a pint of stew’d oysters, and the yolks of six or eight eggs, lay them at an equal distance round the turkey; you must not stew your oysters in gravy but in water, and pour them upon your turkey’s breast; lay round six or eight artichoke-bottoms fry’d, so serve it up without the lid; you must take the fat out of the pie before you put in the oysters.

66. To make a Turkey A-la-Daube.

Take a large turkey and truss it; take down the breast-bone, and stuff it in the breast with some stuffing, as you did the roast turkey, lard it with bacon, then rub the skin of the turkey with the yolk of an egg, and strow over it a little nutmeg, pepper, salt, and a few bread-crumbs, then put it into a copper-dish and fend it to the oven; when you dish it up make for the turkey brown gravy-sauce; shred into your sauce a few oysters and mushrooms; lay round artichoke-bottoms fry’d, stew’d pallets, forc’d-meat-balls, and a little crisp bacon. Garnish your dish with pickled mushrooms, and slices of lemon.

This is a proper dish for a remove.

67. Potted Turkey.

Take a turkey, bone her as you did for the pie, and season it very well in the inside and outside with mace, nutmeg, pepper and salt, then put it into a pot that you design to keep it in, put over it a pound of butter, when it is baked draw from it the gravy, and take off the fat, then squeeze it down very tight in the pot; and to keep it down lay upon it a weight; when it’s cold take part of the butter that came from it, and clarify a little more with it to cover your turkey, and keep it in a cool place for use; you may put a fowl in the belly if you please.

Ducks or geese are potted the same way.

68. How to jugg Pigeons.

Take six or eight pigeons and truss them, season them with nutmeg, pepper and salt. To make the Stuffing. Take the livers and shred them with beef-suet, bread-crumbs, parsley, sweet-marjoram, and two eggs, mix all together, then stuff your pigeons sowing them up at both ends, and put them into your jugg with the breast downwards, with half a pound of butter; stop up the jugg close with a cloth that no steam can get out, then set them in a pot of water to boil; they will take above two hours stewing; mind you keep your pot full of water, and boiling all the time; when they are enough clear from them the gravy, and take the fat clean off; put to your gravy a spoonful of cream, a little lemon-peel, an anchovy shred, a few mushrooms, and a little white wine, thicken it with a little flour and butter, then dish up your pigeons, and pour over them the sauce. Garnish the dish with mushrooms and slices of lemon.

This is proper for a side dish.

69. Mirranaded Pigeons.

Take six pigeons, and truss them as you would do for baking, break the breast-bones, season and stuff them as you did for jugging, put them into a little deep dish and lay over them half a pound of butter; put into your dish a little water. Take half a pound of rice, cree it soft as you would do for eating, and pour it upon the back of a sieve, let it stand while it is cold, then take a spoon and flat it like paste on your hand, and lay on the breast of every pigeon a cake; lay round your dish some puff-paste not over thin, and send them to the oven; about half an hour will bake them.

This is proper at noon for a side-dish.

70. To stew Pigeons.

Take your pigeons, season and stuff them, flat the breast-bone, and truss them up as you would do for baking, dredge them over with a little flour, and fry them in butter, turning them round till all sides be brown, then put them into a stew-pan with as much brown gravy as will cover them, and let them stew whilst your pigeons be enough; then take part of the gravy, an anchovy shred, a little catchup, a small onion, or a shalot, and a little juice of lemon for sauce, pour it over your pigeons, and lay round them forc’d-meat-balls and crisp bacon. Garnish your dish with crisp parsley and lemon.

71. To broil Pigeons whole.

Take your pigeons, season and stuff them with the same stuffing you did jugg’d pigeons, broil them either before a fire or in an oven; when they are enough take the gravy from them, and take off the fat, then put to the gravy two or three spoonfuls of water, a little boil’d parsley shred, and thicken your sauce. Garnish your dish with crisp parsley.

72. Boiled Pigeons with fricassy Sauce.

Take your pigeons, and when you have drawn and truss’d them up, break the breast bone, and lay them in milk and water to make them white, tie them in a cloth and boil them in milk and water; when you dish them up put to them white fricassy sauce, only adding a few shred mushrooms. Garnish with crisp parsley and sippets.

73. To Pot Pigeons.

Take your pigeons and skewer them with their feet cross over the breast, to stand up; season them with pepper and salt, and roast them; so put them into your pot, setting the feet up; when they are cold cover them up with clarified butter.

74. To stew Pallets.

Take three or four large beast pallets and boil them very tender, blanch and cut them in long pieces the length of your finger, then in small bits the cross way; shake them up with a little good gravy and a lump of butter; season them with a little nutmeg and salt, put in a spoonful of white wine, and thicken it with the yolks of eggs as you do, a white fricassy.

75. To make a Fricassy of Pig’s Ears.

Take three or four pig’s ears as large as you would have your dish in bigness, clean and boil them very tender, cut them in small pieces the length of your finger, and fry them with butter till they be brown; so put them into a stew-pan with a little brown gravy, a lump of butter, a spoonful of vinegar, and a little mustard and salt, thicken’d with flour; take two or three pig’s feet and boil them very tender, fit for eating, then cut them in two and take out the large bones, dip them in egg, and strew over them a few bread-crumbs, season them with pepper and salt; you may either fry or broil them, and lay them in the middle of your dish with the pig’s ears.

They are proper for a side-dish.

76. To make a Fricassy of Tripes.

Take the whitest seam tripes you can get and cut them in long pieces, put them into a stew-pan with a little good gravy, a few bread-crumbs, a lump of butter, a little vinegar to your taste, and a little mustard if you like it; shake it up altogether with a little shred parsley. Garnish your dish with sippets.

This is proper for a side-dish.

77. To make a Fricassy of Veal-Sweet-Breads.

Take five or six veal-sweet-breads, according as you would have your dish in bigness, and boil them in water, cut them in thin slices the length-way, dip them in egg, season them with pepper and salt, fry them a light brown; then put them into a stew-pan with a little brown gravy, a spoonful of white wine or juice of lemon, whether you please; thicken it up with flour and butter; and serve it up. Garnish your dish with crisp parsley.

78. To make a white Fricassy of Tripes, to eat like Chickens.

Take the whitest and the thickest seam tripe you can get, cut the white part in thin slices, put it into a stew-pan with a little white gravy, juice of lemon and lemon-peel shred, also a spoonful of white wine; take the yolks of two or three eggs and beat them very well, put to them a little thick cream, shred parsley, and two or three chives if you have any; shake altogether over the stove while it be as thick as cream, but don’t let it boil for fear it curdle. Garnish your dish with sippets, slic’d lemon or mushrooms, and serve it up.

79. To make a brown Fricassy of Eggs.

Take eight or ten eggs, according to the bigness you design your dish, boil them hard, put them in water, take off the shell, fry them in butter whilst they be a deep brown, put them into a stew-pan with a little brown gravy, and a lump of butter, so thicken it up with flour; take two or three eggs, lay them in the middle of the dish, then take the other, cut them in two, and set them with the small ends upwards round the dish; fry some sippets and lay round them. Garnish your dish with crisp parsley.

This is proper for a side-dish in lent or any other time.

80. To make a white Fricassy of Eggs.

Take ten or twelve eggs, boil them hard and pill them, put them in a stew-pan with a little white gravy; take the yolks of two or three eggs, beat them very well, and put to them two or three spoonfuls of cream, a spoonful of white wine, a little juice of lemon, shred parsley, and salt to your taste; shake altogether over the stove till it be as thick as cream, but don’t let it boil; take your eggs and lay one part whole on the dish, the rest cut in halves and quarters, and lay them round your dish; you must not cut them till you lay them on the dish. Garnish your dish with sippets, and serve it up.

81. To stew Eggs in Gravy.

Take a little gravy, pour it into a little pewter dish, and set it over a stove, when it is hot break in as many eggs as will cover the dish bottom, keep pouring the gravy over them with a spoon ‘till they are white at the top, when they are enough strow over them a little salt; fry some square sippets of bread in butter, prick them with the small ends upward, and serve them up.

82. How to Collar a Piece of Beef to eat Cold.

Take a flank of beef or pale-board, which you can get, bone them and take off the inner skin; nick your beef about an inch distance, but mind you don’t cut thro’ the skin of the outside; then take two ounces of saltpetre, and beat it small, and take a large handful of common salt and mix them together, first sprinkling your beef over with a little water, and lay it in an earthen dish, then strinkle over your salt, so let it stand, four or five days, then take a pretty large quantity of all sorts of mild sweet herbs, pick and shred them very small, take some bacon and cut it in long pieces the thickness of your finger, then take your beef and lay one layer of bacon in every nick; and another of the greens; when you have done season your beef with a little beat mace, pepper, salt and nutmeg; you may add a little neat’s tongue, and an anchovy in some of the nicks; so roll it up tight, bind it in a cloth with coarse inkle round it, put it into a large stew-pot and cover it with water; let the beef lie with the end downwards, put to the pickle that was in the beef when it lay in salt, set it in a slow oven all the night, then take it out and bind it tight, and tie up both ends, the next day take it out of the cloth, and put it into pickle; you must take off the fat and boil the pickle, put in a handful of salt, a few bay leaves, a little whole Jamaica and black pepper, a quart of stale strong beer, a little vinegar and alegar; if you make the pickle very good, it will keep five or six months very well; if your beef be not too much baked it will cut all in diamonds.

83. To roll a Breast of Veal to eat cold.

Take a large breast of veal, fat and white, bone it and cut it in two, season it with mace, nutmeg, pepper and salt, in one part you may strinkle a few sweet herbs shred fine, roll them tight up, bind them will with coarse ickle, so boil it an hour and a half; you may make the same pickle as you did for the beef, excepting the strong beer; when it is enough to take it up, and bind it as you did the beef, so hang it up whilst it be cold.

84. To pot Tongues.

Take your tongues and salt them with saltpetre, common salt and bay salt, let them lie ten days, then take them out and boil them whilst they will blanch, cut off the lower part of the tongues, then season them with mace, pepper, nutmeg and salt, put them into a pot and send them to the oven, and the low part of your tongues that you cut off lay upon your tongues, and one pound of butter, then let them bake whilst they are tender, then take them out of the pot, throw over them a little more seasoning, put them into the pot you design to keep them in, press them down very tight, lay over them a weight, and let them stand all night, then cover them with clarified butter: You must not salt your tongues as you do for hanging.

85. How to pot Venison.

Take your venison and cut it in thin pieces, season it with pepper and salt, put it into your pot, lay over it some butter and a little beef-suet, let it stand all night in the oven; when it is baked beat them in a marble mortar or wooden-bowl, put in part of the gravy, and all the fat you take from it; when you have beat it put into your pot, then take the fat lap of a shoulder of mutton, take off the out-skin, and roast it, when it is roasted and cold, cut it in long pieces the thickness of your finger; when you put the venison into the pot, put it in at three times, betwixt every one lay the mutton cross your pot, at an equal distance; if you cut it the right way it will cut all in diamonds; leave some of the venison to lay on the top, and cover it with clarified butter; to keep it for use.

86. To pot all Sorts of Wild-Fowl.

When the wild-fowl are dressed take a paste-pin, and beat them on the breast ‘till they are flat; before you roast them season them with mace, nutmeg, pepper and salt; you must not roast them over much; when you dreaw them season them on the out-side, and set them on one end to drain out the gravy, and put them into your pot; you may put in two layers; if you press them very flat, cover them with clarified butter when they are cold.

87. How to pot Beef.

Take two pounds of the slice or buttock, season it with about two ounces of saltpetre and a little common salt, let it lie two or three days, send it to the oven, and season it with a little pepper, salt and mace; lay over your beef half a pound of butter or beef suet, and let it stand all night in the oven to stew; take from it the gravy and the butter, and beat them (with the beef) in a bowl, then take a quarter of a pound of anchovies, bone them, and beat them too with a little of the gravy; if it be not seasoned enough to your taste, put to it a little more seasoning; put is close down in a pot, and when it is cold cover it up with butter, and keep it for use.

88. To Ragoo a Rump of Beef.

Take a rump of beef, lard it with bacon and spices, betwixt the larding, stuff it with forced meat, made of a pound of veal, three quarters of a pound of beef-suet, a quarter of a pound of fat bacon boiled and shred well by itself, a good quantity of parsley, winter savoury, thyme, sweet-marjoram, and an onion, mix all this together, season it with mace cloves, cinnamon, salt, Jamaica and black pepper, and some grated bread, work the forc’d-meat up with three whites and two yolks of eggs, then stuff it, and lay some rough suet in a stew pan with your beef upon it, let it fry till it be brown then put in some water, a bunch of sweet herbs, a large onion stuffed with cloves, sliced turnips, carrots cut as large as the yolk of an egg, some whole pepper and salt, half a pint of claret, cover it close, and let it stew six or seven hours over a gentle fire, turning it very often.

89. How to make a Sauce for it.

Take truffles, morels, sweet-breads, diced pallets boiled tender, three anchovies, and some lemon-peel, put these into some brown gravy and stew them; if you do not think it thick enough, dredge in a little flour, and just before you pour it on your beef put in a little white wine and vinegar, and serve it up hot.

90. Sauce for boiled Rabbets.

Take a few onions, boil them thoroughly, shifting them in water often, mix them well together with a little melted butter and water. Some add a little pulp of apple and mustard.

91. To salt a Leg of Mutton to eat like Ham.

Take a leg of mutton, an ounce of saltpetre, two ounces of bay-salt, rub it in very well, take a quarter of a pound of coarse sugar, mix it with two or three handfuls of common salt, then take and salt it very well, and let it lie a week, so hang it up, and keep it for use, after it is dry use it, the sooner the better; it won’t keep so long as ham.

92. How to salt Ham or Tongues.

Take a middling ham, two ounces of saltpetre, a quarter of a pound of bay-salt, beat them together, and rub them on your ham very well, before you salt it on the inside, set your salt before the fire to warm; to every ham take half a pound of coarse sugar, mix to it a little of the salt, and rub it in very well, let it lie for a week or ten days, then salt it again very well, and let it lie another week or ten days, then hang it to dry, not very near the fire, nor over much in the air.

Take your tongues and clean them, and cut off the root, then take two ounces of saltpetre, a quarter of a pound of bay-salt well beaten, three or four tongues, according as they are in bigness, lay them on a thing by themselves, for if you lay them under your bacon it flats your tongues, and spoils them; salt them very well, and let them lie as long as the hams with the skin side downwards: You may do a rump of beef the same way, only leave out the sugar.

[Note: The text for the next three recipes — 93, 94 and 95 — was missing from our scans. Only the last part of recipe number 95 is available.]

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. . . bacon, you may put in two or three slices when you send them to the oven.

96. How to make a Hare-Pie.

Parboil the hare, take out the bones, and beat the meat in a mortar with some fat pork or new bacon, then soak it in claret all night, the next day take it out, season it with pepper, salt and nutmeg, then lay the back bone into the middle of the pie, put the meat about it with about three quarters of a pound of butter, and bake it in a puff-paste, but lay no paste in the bottom of the dish.

97. To make a Hare-Pie another Way.

Take the flesh of a hare after it is skined, and string it: take a pound of beef-suet or marrow shred small, with sweet-marjoram, parsley and shalots, take the hare, cut it in pieces, season it with mace, pepper, salt and nutmeg, then bake it either in cold or hot paste, and when it is baked, open it and put to it some melted butter.

98. To make Pig Royal.

Take a pig and roast it the same way as you did for lamb, when you draw it you must not cut it up, when it is cold you must lard it with bacon, cut not your layers too small, if you do they will melt away, cut them about an inch and a quarter long; you must put one row down the back, and one on either side, then strinkle it over with a few breadcrumbs and a little salt, and set it in the oven, an hour will bake it, but mind your oven be not too hot; you must take another pig of a less size, roast it, cut it up, and lie it on each side: The sauce you make for a roast pig will serve for both.

This is proper for a bottom dish at a grand entertainment.

99. To roast Veal a savoury Way.

When you have stuffed your veal, strow some of the ingredients over it; when it is roasted make your sauce of what drops from the meat, put an anchovy in water, and when dissolved pour it into the dripping-pan with a large lump of butter and oysters: toss it up with flour to thicken it.

100. To make a Ham Pie.

Cut the ham round, and lay it in water all night, boil it tender as you would do for eating, take off the skin, strew over it a little pepper, and bake it in a deep dish, put to it a pint of water, and half a pound of butter; you must bake it in puff-paste; but lay no paste in the bottom of the dish; when you send it to the table send it without a lid.

It is proper for a top or bottom dish either summer or winter.

101. To make a Neat’s Tongue Pie.

Take two or three tongues, (according as you would have your pie in bigness) cut off the roots and low parts, take two ounces of saltpetre, a little bay salt, rub them very well, lay them on an earthen dish with the skin side downwards, let them lie for a week or ten days, whilst they be very red, then boil them as tender as you would have them for eating blanch and season with a little pepper and salt, flat them as much as you can, bake them in puff paste in a deep dish, but lay no paste in the bottom, put to them a little gravy, and half a pound of butter; lay your tongues with the wrong side upwards, when they are baked turn them, and serve it up without a lid.

102. To broil Sheep or Hog’s Tongues.

Boil, blanch, and split your tongues, season them with a little pepper and salt, then dip them in egg, strow over them a few bread-crumbs, and broil them whilst they be brown; serve them up with a little gravy and butter.

103. To Pickle Pork.

Cut off the leg, shoulder pieces, the bloody neck and the spare-rib as bare as you can, then cut the middle pieces as large as they can lie in the tub, salt them with saltpetre, bay-salt, and white salt; your saltpetre must be beat small, and mix’d with the other salts; half a peck of white salt, a quart of bay-salt, and half a pound of saltpetre, is enough for a large hog; you must rub the pork very well with your salt, then lay a thick layer of salt all over the tub, then a piece of pork, and do so till all your pork is in; lay the skin side downwards, fill up all the hollows and sides of the tub with little pieces that are not bloody press all down as close as possible, and lay on a good layer of salt on the top, then lay on the legs and shoulder pieces, which must be used first, the rest will keep two years if not pulled up, nor the pickle poured from it. You must observe to see it covered with pickle.

104. To fricassy Calf’s Feet white.

Dress the calf’s feet, boil them as you would do for eating, take out the long bones, cut them in two, and put them into a stew-pan with a little white gravy, and a spoonful or two of white wine; take the yolks of two or three eggs, two or three spoonfuls of cream, grate in a little nutmeg and salt, and shake all together with a lump of butter. Garnish your dish with slices of lemon and currans, and so serve them up.

105. To roll a Pig’s Head to eat like Brawn.

Take a large pig’s head, cut off the groin ends, crack the bones and put it in water, shift it once or twice, cut off the ears, then boil it so tender that the bones will slip out, nick it with a knife in the thick part of the head, throw over it a pretty large handful of salt; take half a dozen of large neat’s feet, boil them while they be soft, split them, and take out all the bones and black bits; take a strong coarse cloth, and lay the feet with the skin side downwards, with all the loose pieces in the inside; press them with your hand to make them of an equal thickness, lay them at that length that they will reach round the head, and throw over them a handful of salt, then lay the head across, one thick part one way and the other another, that the fat may appear alike at both ends; leave one foot out to lay at the top to make a lantern to reach round, bind it with filleting as you would do brawn, and tie it very close at both ends; you may take it out of the cloth the next day, take off the filleting and wash it, wrap it about again very tight, and keep it in brawn-pickle.

This has been often taken for real Brawn.

106. How to fry Calf’s Feet in Butter.

Take four Calf’s feet and blanch them, boil them as you would do for eating, take out the large bones and cut them in two, beat a spoonful of wheat flour and four eggs together, put to it a little nutmeg, pepper and salt, dip in your calf’s feet, and fry them in butter a light brown, and lay them upon your dish with a little melted butter over them. Garnish with slices of lemon and serve them up.

107. How to make Savoury Pattees.

Take the kidney of a loyn of veal before it be roasted, cut it in thin slices, season it with mace, pepper and salt, and make your pattees; lay in every patty a slice, and either bake or fry them.

You may make marrow pattees the same way.

108. To make Egg Pies.

Take and boil half a dozen eggs, half a dozen apples, a pound and a half of beef-suet, a pound of currans, and shred them, so season it with mace, nutmeg and sugar to your taste, a spoonful or two of brandy, and sweet meats, if you please.

109. To make a sweet Chicken Pie.

Break the chicken bones, cut them in little bits, season them lightly with mace and salt, take the yolks of four eggs boiled hard and quartered, five artichoke-bottoms, half a pound of sun raisins stoned, half a pound of citron, half a pound of lemon, half a pound of marrow, a few forc’d-meat-balls, and half a pound of currans well cleaned, so make a light puff-paste, but put no paste in the bottom; when it is baked take a little white wine, a little juice of either orange or lemon, the yolk of an egg well beat, and mix them together, make it hot and put it into your pie; when you serve it up take the same ingredients you use for a lamb or veal pie, only leave out the artichokes.

110. To roast Tongues.

Cut off the roots of two tongues, take three ounces of saltpetre, a little bay-salt and common salt, rub them very well, let them lie a week or ten days to make them red, but not salt, so boil them tender as they will blanch, strow over them a few bread crumbs, set them before the fire to brown on every side.

To make SAUCE for the TONGUES.

Take a few bread crumbs, and as much water as will wet them, then put in claret till they be red, and a little beat cinnamon, sweeten it to your taste, put a little gravy on the dish with your tongues, and the sweet sauce in two basons, set them on each side, so serve them up.

111. To fry Calf’s Feet in Eggs.

Boil your calf’s feet as you would do for eating, take out the long bones and split them in two, when they are cold season ’em with a little pepper, salt and nutmeg; take three eggs, put to them a spoonful of flour, so dip the feet in it and fry them in butter; you must have a little gravy and butter for sauce. Garnish with currans, so serve them up.

112. To make a Minc’d Pie of Calf’s Feet.

Take two or three calf’s feet, and boil them as you would do for eating, take out the long bones, shred them very fine, put to them double their weight of beef-suet shred fine, and about a pound of currans well cleaned, a quarter of a pound of candid orange and citron cut in small pieces, half a pound of sugar, a little salt, a quarter of an ounce of mace and a large nutmeg, beat them together, put in a little juice of lemon or verjuice to your taste, a glass of mountain wine or sack, which you please, so mix all together; bake them in puff-paste.

113. To roast a Woodcock.

When you have dress’d your woodcock, and drawn it under the leg, take out the bitter bit, put in the trales again; whilst the woodcock is roasting set under it an earthen dish with either water in or small gravy, let the woodcock drop into it, take the gravy and put to it a little butter, and thicken it with flour; your woodcock will take about ten minutes roasting if you have a brisk fire; when you dish it up lay round it wheat bread toasts, and pour the sauce over the toasts, and serve it up.

You may roast a partridge the same way, only add crumb sauce in a bason.

114. To make a Calf’s Head Pie.

Take a calf’s head and clean it, boil it as you would do for hashing, when it is cold cut it in thin slices, and season it with a little black pepper, nutmeg, salt, a few shred capers, a few oysters and cockles, two or three mushrooms, and green lemon-peel, mix them all well together, put them into your pie; it must be a standing pie baked in a flat pewter dish, with a rim of puff-paste round the edge; when you have filled the pie with the meat, lay on forc’d-meat-balls, and the yolks of some hard eggs, put in a little small gravy and butter; when it comes from the oven take off the lid, put into it a little white wine to your taste, and shake up the pie, so serve it up without lid.

115. To make a Calf’s Foot Pie.

Take two or three calf’s feet, according as you would have your pie in bigness, boil and bone them as you would do for eating, and when cold cut them in thin slices; take about three quarters of a pound of beef-suet shred fine, half a pound of raisins stoned, half a pound of cleaned currans, a little mace and nutmeg, green lemon-peel, salt, sugar, and candid lemon or orange, mix altogether, and put them in a dish, make a good puff-paste, but let there be no paste in the bottom of the dish; when it is baked, take off the lid, and squeeze in a little lemon or verjuice, cut the lid in sippets and lay round.

116. To make a Woodcock Pie.

Take three or four brace of woodcocks, according as you would have the pie in bigness, dress and skewer them as you would do for roasting, draw them, and season the inside with a little pepper, salt and mace, but don’t wash them, put the trales into the belly again, but nothing else, for there is something in them that gives them a more bitterish taste in the baking than in the roasting, when you put them into the dish lay them with the breast downwards, beat them upon the breast as flat as you can; you must season them on the outside as you do the inside; bake them in puff-paste, but lay none in the bottom of the dish, put to them a jill of gravy and a little butter; you must be very careful your pie be not too much baked; when you serve it up take off the lid and turn the woodcocks with the breast upwards.

You may bake partridge the same way.

117. To pickle Pigeons.

Take your pigeons and bone them; you must begin to bone them at the neck and turn the skin downwards, when they are boned season them with pepper, salt and nutmeg, sew up both ends, and boil them in water and white wine vinegar, a few bay leaves, a little whole pepper and salt; when they are enough take them out of the pickle, and boil it down with a little more salt, when it is cold put in the pigeons and keep them for use.

118. To make a sweet Veal Pie.

Take a loin of veal, cut off the thin part length ways, cut the rest in thin slices, as much as you have occasion for, flat it with your bill, and cut off the bone ends next the chine, season it with nutmeg and salt; take half a pound of raisins stoned, and half a pound of currans well clean’d, mix all together, and lay a few of them at the bottom of the dish, lay a layer of meat; and betwixt every layer lay on your fruit, but leave some for the top; you must make a puff-paste; but lay none in the bottom of the dish; when you have filled your pie, put in a jill of water and a little butter, when it is baked have a caudle to put into it.

To make the caudle, see in receipt 177.

119. Minc’d Pies another way.

Take a pound of the finest seam tripes you can get, a pound and a half of currans well cleaned, two, three or four apples pared and shred very fine, a little green lemon-peel and mace shred, a large nutmeg, a glass of sack or brandy, (which you please) half a pound of sugar, and a little salt, so mix them well together, and fill your patty-pans, then stick five or six bits of candid lemon or orange in every petty-pan, cover them, and when baked they are fit for use.

120. To make a savoury Chicken Pie.

Take half a dozen small chickens, season them with mace, pepper and salt, both inside and out; then take three or four veal sweet-breads, season them with the same, and lay round them a few forc’d-meat-balls, put in a little water and butter; take a little white sweet gravy not over strong, shred a few oysters if you have any, and a little lemon-peel, squeeze in a little lemon juice, not to make it sour; if you have no oysters take the whitest of your sweet breads and boil them, cut them small, and put them in your gravy, thicken it with a little butter and flour; when you open the pie, if there is any fat, skim it off, and pour the sauce over the chicken breasts; so serve it up without lid.

121. To roast a Hanch of Venison.

Take a hanch of venison and spit it, then take a little bread meal, knead and roll it very thin, lay it over the fat part of your venison with a paper over it, tye it round your venison, with a pack-thread; if it be a large hanch it will take four hours roasting, and a midling hanch three hours; keep it basting all the time you roast it; when you dish it up put a little gravy in the dish and sweet sauce in a bason; half an hour before you draw your venison take off the paste, baste it, and let it be a light brown.

122. To make sweet Pattees.

Take the kidney of a loin of veal with the fat, when roasted shred it very fine, put to it a little shred mace, nutmeg and salt, about half a pound of currans, the juice of a lemon, and sugar to your taste, then bake them in puff-paste; you may either fry or bake them.

They are proper for a side-dish.

123. To make Beef-Rolls.

Cut your beef thin as for scotch collops, beat it very well, and season it with salt, Jamaica and white pepper, mace, nutmeg, sweet marjoram, parsley, thyme, and a little onion shred small, rub them on the collops on one side, then take long bits of beef-suet and roll in them, tying them up with a thread; flour them well, and fry them in butter very brown; then have ready some good gravy and stew them an hour and half, stirring them often, and keep them covered, when they are enough take off the threads, and put in a little flour, with a good lump of butter, and squeeze in some lemon, then they are ready for use.

124. To make a Herring-Pie of White Salt Herrings.

Take five or six salt herrings, wash them very well, lay them in a pretty quantity of water all night to take out the saltness, season them with a little black pepper, three or four middling onions pill’d and shred very fine lay one part of them at the bottom of the pie, and the other at the top; to five or six herrings put in half a pound of butter, then lay in your herrings whole, only take off the heads; make them into a standing pie with a thin crust.

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Last updated Friday, March 7, 2014 at 23:10