The Story of the Volsungs

Chapter iv.

How King Siggeir wedded Signy, and bade King Volsung and his son to Gothland.

Now it is to be told that Siggeir goes to bed by Signy that night, and the next morning the weather was fair; then says King Siggeir that he will not bide, lest the wind should wax, or the sea grow impassable; nor is it said that Volsung or his sons letted him herein, and that the less, because they saw that he was fain to get him gone from the feast. But now says Signy to her father —

“I have no will to go away with Seggeir, neither does my heart smile upon him, and I wot, by my fore-knowledge, and from the fetch 19 of our kin, that from this counsel will great evil fall on us if this wedding be not speedily undone.”

“Speak in no such wise, daughter!” said he, “for great shame will it be to him, yea, and to us also, to break troth with him, he being sackless; 20 and in naught may we trust him, and no friendship shall we have of him, if these matters are broken off; but he will pay us back in as evil wise as he may; for that alone is seemly, to hold truly to troth given.”

So King Siggeir got ready for home, and before he went from the feast he bade King Volsung, his father-inlas, come see him in Gothland, and all his sons with him whenas three months should be overpast, and to bring such following with him, as he would have, and as he deemed meet for his honour; and thereby will Siggeir the king pay back for the shortcomings of the wedding-feast, in that he would abide thereat but one night only, a thing not according to the wont of men. So King Volsung gave word to come on the day named, and the kinsmen-inlaw parted, and Siggeir went home with his wife.

19 Fetch; wraith, or familiar spirit.

20 Sackless (A.S. “sacu”, Icel. “sok”.) blameless.

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Last updated Thursday, March 6, 2014 at 22:07