The Story of the Volsungs

Chapter xv.

Of the Welding together of the Shards of the Sward Gram.

So Regin makes a sword, and gives it into Sigurd’s hands. He took the sword, and said —

“Behold thy smithying, Regin!” and therewith smote it into the anvil, and the sword brake; so he cast down the brand, and bade him forge a better.

Then Regin forged another sword, and brought it to Sigurd, who looked thereon.

Then said Regin, “Belike thou art well content therewith, hard master though thou be in smithying.”

So Sigurd proved the sword, and brake it even as the first; then he said to Regin —

“Ah, art thou, mayhappen, a traitor and a liar like to those former kin of thine?”

Therewith he went to his mother, and she welcomed him in seemly wise, and they talked and drank together.

Then spake Sigurd, “Have I heard aright, that King Sigmund gave thee the good sword Gram in two pieces?”

“True enough,” she said.

So Sigurd said, “Deliver them into my hands, for I would have them.”

She said he looked like to win great fame, and gave him the sword. Therewith went Sigurd to Regin, and bade him make a good sword thereof as he best might; Regin grew wroth thereat, but went into the smithy with the pieces of the sword, thinking well meanwhile that Sigurd pushed his head far enow into the matter of smithying. So he made a sword, and as he bore it forth from the forge, it seemed to the smiths as though fire burned along the edges thereof. Now he bade Sigurd take the sword, and said he knew not how to make a sword if this one failed. Then Sigurd smote it into the anvil, and cleft it down to the stock thereof, and neither burst the sword nor brake it. Then he praised the sword much, and thereafter went to the river with a lock of wool, and threw it up against the stream, and it fell asunder when it met the sword. Then was Sigurd glad, and went home.

But Regin said, “Now whereas I have made the sword for thee, belike thou wilt hold to thy troth given, and wilt go meet Fafnir?”

“Surely will I hold thereto,” said Sigurd, “yet first must I avenge my father.”

Now Sigurd the older he grew, the more he grew in the love of all men, so that every child loved him well.

http://ebooks.adelaide.edu.au/m/morris/william/volsungs/chapter15.html

Last updated Thursday, March 6, 2014 at 22:07