The Defence of Guenevere, by William Morris

Two Red Roses Across the Moon

There was a lady lived in a hall,

Large of her eyes, and slim and tall;

And ever she sung from noon to noon,

Two red roses across the moon.

There was a knight came riding by

In early spring, when the roads were dry;

And he heard that lady sing at the noon,

Two red roses across the moon.

Yet none the more he stopp’d at all,

But he rode a-gallop past the hall;

And left that lady singing at noon,

Two red roses across the moon.

Because, forsooth, the battle was set,

And the scarlet and blue had got to be met,

He rode on the spur till the next warm noon:

Two red roses across the moon.

But the battle was scatter’d from hill to hill,

From the windmill to the watermill;

And he said to himself, as it near’d the noon,

Two red roses across the moon.

You scarce could see for the scarlet and blue,

A golden helm or a golden shoe:

So he cried, as the fight grew thick at the noon,

Two red roses across the moon!

Verily then the gold bore through

The huddled spears of the scarlet and blue;

And they cried, as they cut them down at the noon,

Two red roses across the moon!

I trow he stopp’d when he rode again

By the hall, though draggled sore with the rain;

And his lips were pinch’d to kiss at the noon

Two red roses across the moon.

Under the may she stoop’d to the crown,

All was gold, there was nothing of brown;

And the horns blew up in the hall at noon,

Two red roses across the moon.

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Last updated Thursday, March 6, 2014 at 22:07