Letters of John Keats to His Family and Friends, by John Keats

102. — To Fanny Keats.

My dear Fanny — I shall be with you next Monday at the farthest. I could not keep my promise of seeing you again in a week because I am in so unsettled a state of mind about what I am to do — I have given up the Idea of the Indiaman; I cannot resolve to give up my favorite studies: so I purpose to retire into the Country and set my Mind at work once more. A Friend of Mine who has an ill state of health called on me yesterday and proposed to spend a little time with him at the back of the Isle of Wight where he said we might live very cheaply. I agreed to his proposal. I have taken a great dislike to Town — I never go there — some one is always calling on me and as we have spare beds they often stop a couple of days. I have written lately to some acquaintances in Devonshire concerning a cheap Lodging and they have been very kind in letting me know all I wanted. They have described a pleasant place which I think I shall eventually retire to. How came you on with my young Master Yorkshire Man? Did not Mrs. A. sport her Carriage and one? They really surprised me with super civility — how did Mrs. A. manage it? How is the old tadpole gardener and little Master next door? it is to be hop’d they will both die some of these days. Not having been to Town I have not heard whether Mr. A. purposes to retire from business. Do let me know if you have heard anything more about it. If he should not I shall be very disappointed. If any one deserves to be put to his shifts it is that Hodgkinson — as for the other he would live a long time upon his fat and be none the worse for a good long lent. How came miledi to give one Lisbon wine — had she drained the Gooseberry? Truly I cannot delay making another visit — asked to take Lunch, whether I will have ale, wine, take sugar — objection to green — like cream — thin bread and butter — another cup — agreeable — enough sugar — little more cream — too weak — 12 shillin etc. etc. etc. — Lord I must come again. We are just going to Dinner I must must101 with this to the Post ——

Your affectionate Brother

John ——.

101 Sic: obviously for “run” or “go.”

http://ebooks.adelaide.edu.au/k/keats/john/letters/letter102.html

Last updated Friday, March 7, 2014 at 21:44