The Critique of Pure Reason, by Immanuel Kant

Table of Contents

Preface to the First Edition, 1781

Preface to the Second Edition, 1787

Introduction.

  1. Of the difference between Pure and Empirical Knowledge
  2. The Human Intellect, even in an Unphilosophical State, is in Possession of Certain Cognitions “a priori”.
  3. Philosophy stands in need of a Science which shall Determine the Possibility, Principles, and Extent of Human Knowledge “a priori
  4. Of the Difference Between Analytical and Synthetical Judgements.
  5. In all Theoretical Sciences of Reason, Synthetical Judgements “a priori” are contained as Principles.
  6. The Universal Problem of Pure Reason.
  7. Idea and Division of a Particular Science, under the Name of a Critique of Pure Reason.

I. Transcendental Doctrine of Elements.

  1. First Part. Transcendental Aesthetic.
    1. Introductory.
      Section I. Of Space.
    2. Metaphysical Exposition of this Conception.
    3. Transcendental Exposition of the Conception of Space.
    4. Conclusions from the foregoing Conceptions.
      Section II. Of Time.
    5. Metaphysical Exposition of this Conception.
    6. Transcendental Exposition of the Conception of Time.
    7. Conclusions from the above Conceptions.
    8. Elucidation.
    9. General Remarks on Transcendental Aesthetic.
    10. Conclusion of the Transcendental Aesthetic.
  2. Second Part. Transcendental Logic.
    1. Introduction. Idea of a Transcendental Logic.
      1. Of Logic in General.
      2. Of Transcendental Logic.
      3. Of the Division of General Logic into Analytic and Dialectic.
      4. Of the Division of Transcendental Logic into Transcendental Analytic and Dialectic.
    2. First Division. Transcendental Analytic.
      1. Book I. Analytic of Conceptions.
        1. Chapter I. Of the Transcendental Clue to the Discovery of all Pure Conceptions of the Understanding.
        2. Chapter II Of the Deduction of the Pure Conceptions of the Understanding.
        3. Section I Of the Principles of a Transcendental Deduction in general. §§ 9
        4. Transition to the Transcendental Deduction of the Categories. §§ 10
        5. Section II Transcendental Deduction of the pure Conceptions of the Understanding. §§ 11
        6. Of the Originally Synthetical Unity of Apperception. §§ 12
        7. The Principle of the Synthetical Unity of Apperception is the highest Principle of all exercise of the Understanding. §§ 13
        8. What Objective Unity of Self-consciousness is. §§ 14
        9. The Logical Form of all Judgements consists in the Objective Unity of Apperception of the Conceptions contained therein. §§ 15
        10. All Sensuous Intuitions are subject to the Categories, as Conditions under which alone the manifold Content of them can be united in one Consciousness. §§ 16
        11. Observation. §§ 17
        12. In Cognition, its Application to Objects of Experience is the only legitimate use of the Category. §§ 18
        13. §§ 19
        14. Of the Application of the Categories to Objects of the Senses in general. §§ 20
        15. §§ 21
        16. Transcendental Deduction of the universally possible employment in experience of the Pure Conceptions of the Understanding. §§ 22
        17. Result of this Deduction of the Conceptions of the Understanding. §§ 23
      2. Book II. Analytic of Principles.
      3. Appendix.
    3. Second Division. Transcendental Dialectic.
      1. Introduction.
        1. I. Of Transcendental Illusory Appearance.
        2. II. Of Pure Reason as the Seat of Transcendental Illusory Appearance.
      2. Book I. Of the Conceptions of Pure Reason.
        1. Section I— Of Ideas in General.
        2. Section II. Of Transcendental Ideas.
        3. Section III. System of Transcendental Ideas.
      3. Book II. Of the Dialectical Procedure of Pure Reason.
        1. Chapter I. Of the Paralogisms of Pure Reason.
        2. Chapter II. The Antinomy of Pure Reason.
          1. Section I. System of Cosmological Ideas.
          2. Section II. Antithetic of Pure Reason.
          3. Section III. Of the Interest of Reason in these Self-contradictions.
          4. Section IV. Of the necessity imposed upon Pure Reason of presenting a Solution of its Transcendental Problems.
          5. Section V. Sceptical Exposition of the Cosmological Problems presented in the four Transcendental Ideas.
          6. Section VI. Transcendental Idealism as the Key to the Solution of Pure Cosmological Dialectic.
          7. Section VII. Critical Solution of the Cosmological Problem.
          8. Section VIII. Regulative Principle of Pure Reason in relation to the Cosmological Ideas.
          9. Section IX. Of the Empirical Use of the Regulative Principle of Reason with regard to the Cosmological Ideas.
            1. I. Solution of the Cosmological Idea of the Totality of the Composition of Phenomena in the Universe.
            2. II. Solution of the Cosmological Idea of the Totality of the Division of a Whole given in Intuition.
            3. III. Solution of the Cosmological Idea of the Totality of the Deduction of Cosmical Events from their Causes.
            4. IV. Solution of the Cosmological Idea of the Totality of the Dependence of Phenomenal Existences.
        3. Chapter III. The Ideal of Pure Reason.
          1. Section I. Of the Ideal in General.
          2. Section II. Of the Transcendental Ideal (Prototypon Trancendentale).
          3. Section III. Of the Arguments employed by Speculative Reason in Proof of the Existence of a Supreme Being.
          4. Section IV. Of the Impossibility of an Ontological Proof of the Existence of God.
          5. Section V. Of the Impossibility of a Cosmological Proof of the Existence of God.
          6. Section VI. Of the Impossibility of a Physico-Theological Proof.
          7. Section VII. Critique of all Theology based upon Speculative Principles of Reason.
      4. Appendix. Of the Regulative Employment of the Ideas of Pure Reason.

II. Transcendental Doctrine of Method.

  1. Chapter I. The Discipline of Pure Reason.
    1. Section I. The Discipline of Pure Reason in the Sphere of Dogmatism.
    2. Section II. The Discipline of Pure Reason in Polemics.
    3. Section III. The Discipline of Pure Reason in Hypothesis.
    4. Section IV. The Discipline of Pure Reason in Relation to Proofs.
  2. Chapter II. The Canon of Pure Reason.
    1. Section I. Of the Ultimate End of the Pure Use of Reason.
    2. Section II. Of the Ideal of the Summum Bonum as a Determining Ground of the Ultimate End of Pure Reason.
    3. Section III. Of Opinion, Knowledge, and Belief.
  3. Chapter III. The Architectonic of Pure Reason.
  4. Chapter IV. The History of Pure Reason.

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Last updated Friday, March 7, 2014 at 21:44