Lives of the Necromancers, by William Godwin

Table of Contents

Preface.

Lives of the Necromancers

Ambitious Nature of Man

  1. His Desire to Penetrate Into Futurity.
  2. Divination.
  3. Augury.
  4. Chiromancy.
  5. Physiognomy.
  6. Interpretation of Dreams.
  7. Casting of Lots.
  8. Astrology.
  9. Oracles.
  10. Delphi.
  11. The Desire to Command and Control Future Events.
  12. Commerce with the Invisible World.
  13. Sorcery and Enchantment.
  14. Witchcraft.
  15. Compacts with the Devil.
  16. Imps.
  17. Talismans and Amulets.
  18. Necromancy.
  19. Alchemy.
  20. Fairies.
  21. Rosicrucians.
  22. Sylphs and Gnomes, Salamanders and Undines.

Examples of Necromancy and Witchcraft from the Bible.

  1. The Magi, or Wise Men of the East.
  2. Egypt.
  3. Statue of Memnon.
  4. Temple of Jupiter Ammon: its Oracles.
  5. Chaldea and Babylon.
  6. Zoroaster.

Greece.

  1. Deities of Greece.
  2. Demigods.
  3. Daedalus.
  4. The Argonauts.
  5. Medea.
  6. Circe.
  7. Orpheus.
  8. Amphion.
  9. Tiresias.
  10. Abaris.
  11. Pythagoras.
  12. Epimenides.
  13. Empedocles.
  14. Aristeas.
  15. Hermotimus.
  16. The Mother of Demaratus, King of Sparta.
  17. Oracles.
  18. Invasion of Xerxes Into Greece.
  19. Democritus.
  20. Socrates.

Rome.

  1. Virgil.
  2. Polydorus.
  3. Dido.
  4. Romulus.
  5. Numa.
  6. Tullus Hostilius.
  7. Accius Navius.
  8. Servius Tullius.
  9. The Sorceress of Virgil.
  10. Canidia.
  11. Erichtho.
  12. Sertorius.
  13. Casting Out Devils.
  14. Simon Magus.
  15. Elymas, the Sorcerer.
  16. Nero.
  17. Vespasian.
  18. Apollonius of Tyana.
  19. Apuleius.
  20. Alexander the Paphlagonian.

Revolution Produced in the History of Necromancy and Witchcraft upon the Establishment of Christianity.

  1. Magical Consultations Respecting the Life of the Emperor.

History of Necromancy in the East.

  1. General Silence of the East Respecting Individual Necromancers.
  2. Rocail.
  3. Hakem, Otherwise Mocanna.
  4. Arabian Nights’ Entertainments.
  5. Persian Tales.
  6. Story of a Goule.
  7. Arabian Nights.
  8. Resemblance of the Tales of the East and of Europe.
  9. Causes of Human Credulity.

Dark Ages of Europe

  1. Merlin.
  2. St. Dunstan.

Communication of Europe and the Saracens

  1. Gerbert, Pope Silvester Ii.
  2. Benedict the Ninth.
  3. Gregory the Seventh.
  4. Duff, King of Scotland.
  5. Macbeth.
  6. Virgil.
  7. Robert of Lincoln.
  8. Michael Scot.
  9. The Dean of Badajoz.
  10. Miracle of the Tub of Water.
  11. Institution of Friars.
  12. Albertus Magnus.
  13. Roger Bacon.
  14. Thomas Aquinas.
  15. Peter of Apono.
  16. English Law of High Treason.
  17. Ziito.
  18. Transmutation of Metals.
  19. Artephius.
  20. Raymond Lulli.
  21. Arnold of Villeneuve.
  22. English Laws Respecting Transmutation.

Revival of Letters.

  1. Joan of Arc.
  2. Eleanor Cobham, Duchess of Gloucester.
  3. Richard III.

Sanguinary Proceedings Against Witchcraft.

  1. Savonarola.
  2. Trithemius.
  3. Luther.
  4. Cornelius Agrippa.
  5. Faustus.
  6. Sabellicus.
  7. Paracelsus
  8. Cardan.
  9. Quacks, Who in Cool Blood Undertook to Overreach Mankind.
  10. Benvenuto Cellini.
  11. Nostradamus.
  12. Doctor Dee.
  13. Earl of Derby.
  14. King James’s Voyage to Norway.
  15. John Fian.
  16. King James’s Demonology.
  17. Statute, 1 James I.
  18. Forman and Others.
  19. Latest Ideas of James on the Subject.
  20. Lancashire Witches.
  21. Lady Davies.
  22. Edward Fairfax.
  23. Doctor Lamb.
  24. Urbain Grandier.
  25. Astrology.
  26. William Lilly.
  27. Matthew Hopkins.
  28. Cromwel.
  29. Dorothy Mateley.
  30. Witches Hanged by Sir Matthew Hale.
  31. Witchcraft in Sweden.
  32. Witchcraft in New England.

Conclusion.

http://ebooks.adelaide.edu.au/g/godwin/william/necro/contents.html

Last updated Monday, March 17, 2014 at 17:11