Curiosities of Literature, by Isaac Disraeli

Table of Contents

Advertisement.

On the Life and Writings of Mr. Disraeli.

Preface.

  1. Libraries.
  2. The Bibliomania.
  3. Literary Journals.
  4. Recovery of Manuscripts.
  5. Sketches of Criticism.
  6. The Persecuted Learned.
  7. Poverty of the Learned.
  8. Imprisonment of the Learned.
  9. Amusements of the Learned.
  10. Portraits of Authors.
  11. Destruction of Books.
  12. Some Notices of Lost Works.
  13. Quodlibets, or Scholastic Disquisitions.
  14. Fame Contemned.
  15. The Six Follies of Science.
  16. Imitators.
  17. Cicero’s Puns.
  18. Prefaces.
  19. Early Printing.
  20. Errata.
  21. Patrons.
  22. Poets, Philosophers, and Artists, Made by Accident.
  23. Inequalities of Genius.
  24. Geographical Style.
  25. Legends.
  26. The Port-Royal Society.
  27. The Progress of Old Age in New Studies.
  28. Spanish Poetry.
  29. Saint Evremond.
  30. Men of Genius Deficient in Conversation.
  31. Vida.
  32. The Scuderies.
  33. De La Rochefoucault.
  34. Prior’s Hans Carvel.
  35. The Student in the Metropolis.
  36. The Talmud.
  37. Rabbinical Stories.
  38. On the Custom of Saluting After Sneezing.
  39. Bonaventure De Periers.
  40. Grotius.
  41. Noblemen Turned Critics.
  42. Literary Impostures.
  43. Cardinal Richelieu.
  44. Aristotle and Plato.
  45. Abelard and Eloisa.
  46. Physiognomy.
  47. Milton.
  48. Origin of Newspapers.
  49. Trials and Proofs of Guilt in Superstitious Ages.
  50. The Inquisition.
  51. Singularities Observed by Various Nations in Their Repasts.
  52. Monarchs.
  53. Of the Titles of Illustrious, Highness, and Excellence.
  54. Titles of Sovereigns.
  55. Royal Divinities.
  56. Dethroned Monarchs
  57. Feudal Customs.
  58. Gaming.
  59. The Arabic Chronicle.
  60. Metempsychosis.
  61. Spanish Etiquette.
  62. The Goths and Huns.
  63. Vicars of Bray.
  64. Douglas.
  65. Critical History of Poverty.
  66. Solomon and Sheba.
  67. Hell.
  68. The Absent Man.
  69. Wax-Work.
  70. Pasquin and Marforio.
  71. Female Beauty and Ornaments.
  72. Modern Platonism.
  73. Anecdotes of Fashion.
  74. A Senate of Jesuits.
  75. The Lover’s Heart.
  76. The History of Gloves.
  77. Relics of Saints.
  78. Perpetual Lamps of the Ancients.
  79. Natural Productions Resembling Artificial Compositions.
  80. The Poetical Garland of Julia.
  81. Tragic Actors.
  82. Jocular Preachers.
  83. Masterly Imitators.
  84. Edward the Fourth.
  85. Elizabeth.
  86. The Chinese Language.
  87. Medical Music.
  88. Minute Writing.
  89. Numerical Figures.
  90. English Astrologers.
  91. Alchymy.
  92. Titles of Books.
  93. Literary Follies.
  94. Literary Controversy.
  95. Literary Blunders.
  96. A Literary Wife.
  97. Dedications.
  98. Philosophical Descriptive Poems.
  99. Pamphlets.
  100. Little Books.
  101. A Catholic’s Refutation.
  102. The Good Advice of an Old Literary Sinner.
  103. Mysteries, Moralities, Farces, and Sotties.
  104. Love and Folly, an Ancient Morality.
  105. Religious Nouvellettes.
  106. “Critical Sagacity,” And “Happy Conjecture;” Or, Bentley’s Milton.
  107. A Jansenist Dictionary.
  108. Manuscripts and Books.
  109. The Turkish Spy.
  110. Spenser, Jonson, and Shakspeare.
  111. Ben Jonson, Feltham, and Randolph.
  112. Ariosto and Tasso.
  113. Bayle.
  114. Cervantes.
  115. Magliabechi.
  116. Abridgers.
  117. Professors of Plagiarism and Obscurity.
  118. Literary Dutch.
  119. The Productions of the Mind Not Seizable by Creditors.
  120. Critics.
  121. Anecdotes of Censured Authors.
  122. Virginity.
  123. A Glance into the French Academy.
  124. Poetical and Grammatical Deaths.
  125. Scarron.
  126. Peter Corneille.
  127. Poets.
  128. Romances.
  129. The Astrea.
  130. Poets Laureat.
  131. Angelo Politian.
  132. Original Letter of Queen Elizabeth.
  133. Anne Bullen.
  134. James the First.
  135. General Monk and His Wife.
  136. Philip and Mary.
  137. Charles the First.
  138. Duke of Buckingham.
  139. The Death of Charles IX.
  140. Royal Promotions.
  141. Nobility.
  142. Modes of Salutation, and Amicable Ceremonies, Observed in Various Nations.
  143. Fire, and the Origin of Fireworks.
  144. The Bible Prohibited and Improved.
  145. Origin of the Materials of Writing.
  146. Anecdotes of European Manners.
  147. The Early Drama.
  148. The Marriage of the Arts.
  149. A Contrivance in Dramatic Dialogue.
  150. The Comedy of a Madman.
  151. Solitude.
  152. Literary Friendships.
  153. Anecdotes of Abstraction of Mind.
  154. Richardson.
  155. Influence of a Name.
  156. The Jews of York.
  157. The Sovereignty of the Seas.
  158. On the Custom of Kissing Hands.
  159. Popes.
  160. Literary Composition.
  161. Poetical Imitations and Similarities.
  162. Explanation of the Fac-Simile.
  163. Literary Fashions.
  164. The Pantomimical Characters.
  165. Extemporal Comedies.
  166. Massinger, Milton, and the Italian Theatre.
  167. Songs of Trades, or Songs for the People.
  168. Introducers of Exotic Flowers, Fruits, Etc.
  169. Usurers of the Seventeenth Century.
  170. Chidiock Titchbourne.
  171. Elizabeth and Her Parliament.
  172. Anecdotes of Prince Henry, the Son of James I., when a Child.
  173. The Diary of a Master of the Ceremonies.
  174. Diaries — Moral, Historical, and Critical.
  175. Licensers of the Press.
  176. Of Anagrams and Echo Verses.
  177. Orthography of Proper Names.
  178. Names of Our Streets.
  179. Secret History of Edward Vere, Earl of Oxford.
  180. Ancient Cookery, and Cooks.
  181. Ancient and Modern Saturnalia.
  182. ReliquiÆ GethinianÆ.
  183. Robinson Crusoe.
  184. Catholic and Protestant Dramas.
  185. The History of the Theatre During its Suppression.
  186. Drinking-Customs in England.
  187. Literary Anecdotes.
  188. Condemned Poets.
  189. Acajou and Zirphile.
  190. Tom O’ Bedlams.
  191. Introduction of Tea, Coffee, and Chocolate.
  192. Charles the First’s Love of the Fine Arts.
  193. Secret History of Charles the First, and His Queen Henrietta.
  194. The Minister — The Cardinal Duke of Richelieu.
  195. The Minister — Duke of Buckingham, Lord Admiral, Lord General, &c. &c. &c.
  196. Felton, the Political Assassin.
  197. Johnson’s Hints for the Life of Pope.
  198. Modern Literature — Bayle’s Critical Dictionary
  199. Characteristics of Bayle.
  200. Cicero Viewed as a Collector.
  201. The History of the Caracci.
  202. An English Academy of Literature.
  203. Quotation.
  204. The Origin of Dante’s Inferno.
  205. Of a History of Events which have Not Happened.
  206. Of False Political Reports.
  207. Of Suppressors and Dilapidators of Manuscripts.
  208. Parodies.
  209. Anecdotes of the Fairfax Family.
  210. Medicine and Morals.
  211. Psalm-Singing.
  212. On the Ridiculous Titles Assumed by Italian Academies.
  213. On the Hero of Hudibras; Butler Vindicated.
  214. Shenstone’s School-Mistress.
  215. Ben Jonson on Translation.
  216. The Loves of “The Lady Arabella.”
  217. Domestic History of Sir Edward Coke.
  218. Of Coke’s Style, and His Conduct.
  219. Secret History of Authors who have Ruined Their Booksellers.
  220. Local Descriptions.
  221. Masques.
  222. Of Des Maizeaux, and the Secret History of Anthony Collins’s Manuscripts.
  223. History of New Words.
  224. The Philosophy of Proverbs.
  225. Confusion of Words.
  226. Political Nicknames.
  227. The Domestic Life of a Poet. — Shenstone Vindicated.
  228. Secret History of the Building of Blenheim.
  229. Secret History of Sir Walter Rawleigh.
  230. An Authentic Narrative of the Last Hours of Sir Walter Rawleigh.
  231. Literary Unions.
  232. Of a Biography Painted.
  233. Cause and Pretext.
  234. Political Forgeries and Fictions.
  235. Expression of Suppressed Opinion.
  236. Autographs.
  237. The History of Writing-Masters.
  238. The Italian Historians.
  239. Of Palaces Built by Ministers.
  240. “Taxation No Tyranny!”
  241. The Book of Death.
  242. History of the Skeleton of Death.
  243. The Rival Biographers of Heylin.
  244. Of Lenglet Du Fresnoy.
  245. The Dictionary of Trevoux.
  246. Quadrio’s Account of English Poetry.
  247. “Political Religionism.”
  248. Toleration.
  249. Apology for the Parisian Massacre.
  250. Prediction.
  251. Dreams at the Dawn of Philosophy.
  252. On Puck the Commentator.
  253. Literary Forgeries.
  254. Of Literary Filchers.
  255. Of Lord Bacon at Home.
  256. Secret History of the Death of Queen Elizabeth.
  257. James the First as a Father and a Husband.
  258. The Man of One Book.
  259. A Bibliognoste.
  260. Secret History of an Elective Monarchy.
  261. Buildings in the Metropolis, and Residence in the Country.
  262. Royal Proclamations.
  263. True Sources of Secret History.
  264. Literary Residences.
  265. Whether Allowable to Ruin Oneself?
  266. Discoveries of Secluded Men.
  267. Sentimental Biography.
  268. Literary Parallels.
  269. The Pearl Bibles and Six Thousand Errata.
  270. View of a Particular Period of the State of Religion in Our CIVIL Wars.
  271. Buckingham’s Political Coquetry with the Puritans.
  272. Sir Edward Coke’s Exceptions Against the High Sheriff’s Oath.
  273. Secret History of Charles the First and His First Parliaments.
  274. The Rump.
  275. Life and Habits of a Literary Antiquary. — Oldys and His Manuscripts.

http://ebooks.adelaide.edu.au/d/disraeli/isaac/curiosities/contents.html

Last updated Saturday, March 1, 2014 at 20:37