The Carmina of Caius Valerius Catullus, by Catullus

xxxxiiii.

O funde noster seu Sabine seu Tiburs,

(Nam te esse Tiburtem autumant, quibus non est

Cordi Catullum laedere: at quibus cordist,

Quovis Sabinum pignore esse contendunt)

Sed seu Sabine sive verius Tiburs, 5

Fui libenter in tua suburbana

Villa malamque pectore expuli tussim,

Non inmerenti quam mihi meus venter,

Dum sumptuosas adpeto, dedit, cenas.

Nam, Sestianus dum volo esse conviva, 10

Orationem in Antium petitorem

Plenam veneni et pestilentiae legi.

Hic me gravido frigida et frequens tussis

Quassavit usque dum in tuum sinum fugi

Et me recuravi otioque et urtica. 15

Quare refectus maximas tibi grates

Ago, meum quod non es ulta peccatum.

Nec deprecor iam, si nefaria scripta

Sesti recepso, quin gravidinem et tussim

Non mi, sed ipsi Sestio ferat frigus, 20

Qui tum vocat me, cum malum librum legi.

xxxxiiii.

Catullus to His Own Farm.

O Farm our own, Sabine or Tiburtine,

(For style thee “Tiburs” who have not at heart

To hurt Catullus, whereas all that have

Wage any wager thou be Sabine classed)

But whether Sabine or of Tiburs truer 5

To thy suburban Cottage fared I fain

And fro’ my bronchials drave that cursèd cough

Which not unmerited on me my maw,

A-seeking sumptuous banquetings, bestowed.

For I requesting to be Sestius’ guest 10

Read against claimant Antius a speech,

Full-filled with poisonous pestilential trash.

Hence a grave frigid rheum and frequent cough

Shook me till fled I to thy bosom, where

Repose and nettle-broth healed all my ills. 15

Wherefore recruited now best thanks I give

To thee for nowise punishing my sins:

Nor do I now object if noisome writs

Of Sestius hear I, but that cold and cough

And rheum may plague, not me, but Sestius’ self 20

Who asks me only his ill writs to read.

O, Homestead of ours, whether Sabine or Tiburtine (for that thou’rt Tiburtine folk concur, in whose heart ’tis not to wound Catullus; but those in whose heart ’tis, will wager anything thou’rt Sabine) but whether Sabine or more truly Tiburtine, o’erjoyed was I to be within thy rural country-home, and to cast off an ill cough from my chest, which — not unearned — my belly granted me, for grasping after sumptuous feeds. For, in my wish to be Sestius’ guest, his defence against the plaintiff Antius, crammed with venom and pestilent dulness, did I read through. Hence a chill heavy rheum and fitful cough shattered me continually until I fled to thine asylum, and brought me back to health with rest and nettle-broth. Wherefore, remanned, I give thee utmost thanks, that thou hast not avenged my fault. Nor do I pray now for aught but that, should I retake Sestius’ nefarious script, its frigid vapidness may bring a cold and cough to Sestius’ self; for he but invites me when I read dull stuff.

http://ebooks.adelaide.edu.au/c/catullus/carmina/poem44.html

Last updated Saturday, March 1, 2014 at 20:37