The Carmina of Caius Valerius Catullus, by Catullus

xxx.

Alfene inmemor atque unanimis false sodalibus

Iam te nil miseret, dure, tui dulcis amiculi?

Iam me prodere, iam non dubitas fallere, perfide?

Nec facta inpia fallacum hominum caelicolis placent:

Quod tu neglegis, ac me miserum deseris in malis. 5

Eheu quid faciant, dic, homines, cuive habeant fidem?

Certe tute iubebas animam tradere, inique, me

Inducens in amorem, quasi tuta omnia mi forent.

Idem nunc retrahis te ac tua dicta omnia factaque

Ventos inrita ferre ac nebulas aerias sinis. 10

Si tu oblitus es, at di meminerunt, meminit Fides,

Quae te ut paeniteat postmodo facti faciet tui.

xxx.

To Alfenus the Perjuror.

Alfénus! short of memory, false to comrades dearest-dear,

Now hast no pity (hardened Soul!) for friend and loving fere?

Now to betray me, now to guile thou (traitor!) ne’er dost pause?

Yet impious feats of fraudful men ne’er force the Gods’ applause:

When heed’st thou not deserting me (Sad me!) in sorest scathe, 5

Ah say whate’er shall humans do? in whom shall man show faith?

For sure thou bad’st me safely yield my spirit (wretch!) to thee,

Lulling my love as though my life were all security.

The same now dost withdraw thyself and every word and deed

Thou suffer’st winds and airy clouds to sweep from out thy head. 10

But an forget thou, mindful be the Gods, and Faith in mind

Bears thee, and soon shall gar thee rue the deeds by thee design’d.

Alfenus, unmemoried and unfaithful to thy comrades true, is there now no pity in thee, O hard of heart, for thine sweet loving friend? Dost thou betray me now, and scruplest not to play me false now, dishonourable one? Yet the irreverent deeds of traitorous men please not the dwellers in heaven: this thou takest no heed of, leaving me wretched amongst my ills. Alas, what may men do, I pray you, in whom put trust? In truth thou didst bid me entrust my soul to thee, sans love returned, lulling me to love, as though all [love-returns] were safely mine. Yet now thou dost withdraw thyself, and all thy purposeless words and deeds thou sufferest to be wafted away into winds and nebulous clouds. If thou hast forgotten, yet the gods remember, and in time to come will make thee rue thy doing.

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Last updated Saturday, March 1, 2014 at 20:37