The Carmina of Caius Valerius Catullus, by Catullus

xxviii.

Pisonis comites, cohors inanis

Aptis sarcinulis et expeditis,

Verani optime tuque mi Fabulle,

Quid rerum geritis? satisne cum isto

Vappa frigoraque et famem tulistis? 5

Ecquidnam in tabulis patet lucelli

Expensum, ut mihi, qui meum secutus

Praetorem refero datum lucello

‘O Memmi, bene me ac diu supinum

Tota ista trabe lentus inrumasti.’ 10

Sed, quantum video, pari fuistis

Casu: nam nihilo minore verpa

Farti estis. pete nobiles amicos.

At vobis mala multa di deaeque

Dent, opprobria Romulei Remique. 15

xxviii.

To Friends on Return from Travel.

Followers of Piso, empty band

With your light budgets packt to hand,

Veránius best! Fabúllus mine!

What do ye? Bore ye enough, in fine

Of frost and famine with yon sot? 5

What loss or gain have haply got

Your tablets? so, whenas I ranged

With Praetor, gains for loss were changed.

“O Memmius! thou did’st long and late

—— me supine slow and ——” 10

But (truly see I) in such case

Diddled you were by wight as base

Sans mercy. Noble friends go claim!

Now god and goddess give you grame

Disgrace of Romulus! Remus’ shame! 15

Piso’s Company, a starveling band, with lightweight knapsacks, scantly packed, most dear Veranius thou, and my Fabullus eke, how fortunes it with you? have ye borne frost and famine enow with that sot? Which in your tablets appear — the profits or expenses? So with me, who when I followed a praetor, inscribed more gifts than gains. “O Memmius, well and slowly didst thou irrumate me, supine, day by day, with the whole of that beam.” But, from what I see, in like case ye have been; for ye have been crammed with no smaller a poker. Courting friends of high rank! But may the gods and goddesses heap ill upon ye, reproach to Romulus and Remus.

http://ebooks.adelaide.edu.au/c/catullus/carmina/poem28.html

Last updated Saturday, March 1, 2014 at 20:37