The Carmina of Caius Valerius Catullus, by Catullus

ii.

Passer, deliciae meae puellae,

Quicum ludere, quem in sinu tenere,

Quoi primum digitum dare adpetenti

Et acris solet incitare morsus,

Cum desiderio meo nitenti 5

Carum nescioquid libet iocari

Vt solaciolum sui doloris,

Credo ut iam gravis acquiescat ardor:

Tecum ludere sicut ipsa possem

Et tristis animi levare curas! 10


Tam gratumst mihi quam ferunt puellae

Pernici aureolum fuisse malum,

Quod zonam soluit diu ligatam.

ii.

Lesbia’s Sparrow.

Sparrow! my pet’s delicious joy,

Wherewith in bosom nurst to toy

She loves, and gives her finger-tip

For sharp-nib’d greeding neb to nip,

Were she who my desire withstood 5

To seek some pet of merry mood,

As crumb o’ comfort for her grief,

Methinks her burning lowe’s relief:

Could I, as plays she, play with thee,

That mind might win from misery free! 10


To me t’were grateful (as they say),

Gold codling was to fleet-foot May,

Whose long-bound zone it loosed for aye.

Sparrow, petling of my girl, with which she wantons, which she presses to her bosom, and whose eager peckings is accustomed to incite by stretching forth her forefinger, when my bright-hued beautiful one is pleased to jest in manner light as (perchance) a solace for her heart ache, thus methinks she allays love’s pressing heats! Would that in manner like, I were able with thee to sport and sad cares of mind to lighten!


This were gracious to me as in story old to the maiden fleet of foot was the apple golden-fashioned which unloosed her girdle long-time girt.

http://ebooks.adelaide.edu.au/c/catullus/carmina/poem2.html

Last updated Saturday, March 1, 2014 at 20:37