Friar Bacon His Discovery of the Miracles of Art, Nature, and Magick

Chap. XI.

FORTE.603.

Of the same Subject another way.

TO your desire in the Arabian year 630. I return this Answer. You must have the Medicine which may be dissolved in the thing liquified and steeped in it, and penetrate its interiour parts, and may be mingled with it;and it may not be a fugitive servant,but transmute it. Let it be mingled by reason of the spirit, and let it be fixed by the Calx of the metal; it is to be thought that fixion is prepared, when the body and spirit are set in its place, and the spirit is made a body. Take then of the bones of Adam, and of the Calx the same weight; let there be six to the Stone Tagi, and five to the stone of Pearl; let them be ground with Aqua vitae, whose property it is to dissolve all other things, so as in it they are dissolved and assated, until it be incerate, i.e. let the parts be united, as the parts in wax. The sign of inceration is, that the Medicine liquifies upon iron very hot. Then let it be put in the same water in some hot and moist place, or let it hang in the vapour of waters made very hot: after that dissolve and congeal them against the Sunne, Afterwards take Saltpeter, and argentum vivum shall be converted into lead: And again, wash the lead with it, and mundifie it, that it may be the next to silver, and then work as a pious man, and also the whole weight must be 30. But yet of Saltpeter L U R U V O P O Vir Can Utriet Sulphuris: and so you may make Thunder and Lightning, if you understand the Artifice: but you must observe, whether I speak ├Žnigmatically, or according to the truth. Some men have supposed otherwise: For it is told me, that you must resolve all into its first matter, of which you have Aristotle speaking in vulgar and known places, which makes me silent herein. When you have this, you have pure, simple and equal Elements. And this you may do by contrary thing and various operations, which formerly I have called the Claves of the Art. And Aristotle sayes, That the equality of potencies excludes action, and passion, and corruption. And these things Averrho's affirms, reproving Galen. And this Medicine is esteemed the more pure and simple which may be found, which is prevalent against Feavers, passions of the mind and body. Farewell. Whoever unlocks these,hath a key which opens and no man shutts: and when he hath shut no man opens.

In this Translation, I followed Dr Dees Edition, Printed at Hamburg, 1618.

F I N I S.

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